Buy used:
$205.98
FREE delivery: July 12 - 14 Details
Fastest delivery: July 6 - 10
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by Ready To Shop
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Does not include the first CD with Master Class 1, 2. Includes all other CDs with the other Master Classes, and has two copies of the CD with Master Class 3, 4. Includes the written handbook. Does not include Pitch Perfect for Children. The CDs are in good condition.
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Amazon book clubs early access

Join or create book clubs

Choose books together

Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free.
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Follow the Author

Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.


The Perfect Pitch Ear Training SuperCourse version 2.5 Audio CD – January 1, 2005

3.4 out of 5 stars 19 ratings

Price
New from Used from
Audio CD
$205.98
$34.68

Celebrity picks - see what your favorite authors are reading
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
    Apple
  • Android
    Android
  • Windows Phone
    Windows Phone
  • Click here to download from Amazon appstore
    Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

kcpAppSendButton

Special offers and product promotions

  • Amazon Business: Make the most of your Amazon Business account with exclusive tools and savings. Login now

Editorial Reviews

Review


I, like many of you, have come across the advertisements for The Perfect Pitch SuperCourse countless times over the years. When perusing any number of jazz periodicals I have stumbled upon these ads and viewed them with a mixture of skepticism, curiosity and envy.

As Burge notes, two separate studies at Ohio State University and the University of Calgary have shown that a large segment of the test subjects using this course developed perfect pitch (to some extent) and these claims certainly piqued my interest even more.

The basis of this course is to open the ear in order to observe, hear and notice the distinctions in pitch color that exist. David Lucas Burge, creator of the course and guide through the process, explains that each note has a distinct color quality and we just have to learn how to hear this He mentions that the ear has been conditioned to hear in a horizontal fashion and we need to develop the ability to hear things in a vertical manner. These subtle distinctions, like the example he gives of the F# being twangy and the Eb being mellow, seemed odd at first, but became slightly perceptible as I worked through things.Various exercises helped to improve the ability to hear things and create musical relationships in the mind.

I am still working through the material and letting my progress guide me in terms of when I move onto a new lesson. If you re curious as to how long this should take, Burge says six months to a year is a good benchmark. It could take more or less time depending upon individual progress and where your ear happens to be when things start. In addition, all of this is assuming that you are diligent in following instructions and putting in the time necessary to develop these skills.

While this isn t painful and grueling stuff, it does take discipline and focus to go through this material and practice on a regular basis. If you don t believe me, quite a few discussion threads online and product reviews (yes, I did want to see what others were saying) will bear this out. However, I can tell you from personal experience that whether or not you end up with perfect pitch, this class will improve your ability to hear things and I now believe that it is possible to develop perfect pitch as an adult. -- Dan Bilawsky, Jazz Improv Magazine


Perfect pitch. It's so mysterious. They say you're born with it. An old guitarist friend of mine has it. In high school we'd sit in my basement with our Les Paul knockoffs and work on songs together. I noticed his innate skill when, with his back turned to me, I strummed a complex chord and he named it, exactly, including whatever suspension it was I had fingered. I played another chord and he named it too. We played this guessing game for the better part of an hour.

After a while I realized that this God-given ability to recognize notes without the aid of a reference pitch was also the reason he was such a quick study on any song he had to learn by ear. To be fair, he had also logged countless hours of practice on guitar-having perfect pitch doesn't mean you don't have to work toward instrumental proficiency. But an ear that knows which note is which does make playing, especially improvising, easier, no matter how sharp your chops. --Russell Carlson, Jazz Times Magazine

Everything David Lucas Burge talks about resonates deeply with me. He confirms the intuitive part of listening that I always took for granted. I don't remember a time when I didn't have Perfect Pitch. But I never understood how Perfect Pitch works until I heard Burge speak about it. It warms my heart that Burge has unlocked the secrets and principles of what Perfect Pitch is and how anyone who takes a moment to listen can acquire it.

Burge's course is often imitated, but is never surpassed. Every musician will enjoy this essential guided tour int --Richard Bosworth, D.M, Doctor of Music</bbr /


I, like many of you, have come across the advertisements for The Perfect Pitch SuperCourse countless times over the years. When perusing any number of jazz periodicals I have stumbled upon these ads and viewed them with a mixture of skepticism, curiosity and envy.

As Burge notes, two separate studies at Ohio State University and the University of Calgary have shown that a large segment of the test subjects using this course developed perfect pitch (to some extent) and these claims certainly piqued my interest even more.

The basis of this course is to open the ear in order to observe, hear and notice the distinctions in pitch color that exist. David Lucas Burge, creator of the course and guide through the process, explains that each note has a distinct color quality and we just have to learn how to hear this He mentions that the ear has been conditioned to hear in a horizontal fashion and we need to develop the ability to hear things in a vertical manner. These subtle distinctions, like the example he gives of the F# being twangy and the Eb being mellow, seemed odd at first, but became slightly perceptible as I worked through things.Various exercises helped to improve the ability to hear things and create musical relationships in the mind.

I am still working through the material and letting my progress guide me in terms of when I move onto a new lesson. If you re curious as to how long this should take, Burge says six months to a year is a good benchmark. It could take more or less time depending upon individual progress and where your ear happens to be when things start. In addition, all of this is assuming that you are diligent in following instructions and putting in the time necessary to develop these skills.

While this isn t painful and grueling stuff, it does take discipline and focus to go through this material and practice on a regular basis. If you don t believe me, quite a few discussion threads online and product reviews (yes, I did want to see what others were saying) will bear this out. However, I can tell you from personal experience that whether or not you end up with perfect pitch, this class will improve your ability to hear things and I now believe that it is possible to develop perfect pitch as an adult. -- Dan Bilawsky, Jazz Improv Magazine


Perfect pitch. It's so mysterious. They say you're born with it. An old guitarist friend of mine has it. In high school we'd sit in my basement with our Les Paul knockoffs and work on songs together. I noticed his innate skill when, with his back turned to me, I strummed a complex chord and he named it, exactly, including whatever suspension it was I had fingered. I played another chord and he named it too. We played this guessing game for the better part of an hour.

After a while I realized that this God-given ability to recognize notes without the aid of a reference pitch was also the reason he was such a quick study on any song he had to learn by ear. To be fair, he had also logged countless hours of practice on guitar-having perfect pitch doesn't mean you don't have to work toward instrumental proficiency. But an ear that knows which note is which does make playing, especially improvising, easier, no matter how sharp your chops. --Russell Carlson, Jazz Times Magazine

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Excerpted from The Perfect Pitch Ear Training SuperCourse by David Lucas Burge. Copyright (c) 2005. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved

Chapter 1: How I Discovered the Secret to Perfect Pitch

It all started as a sort of teenage rivalry . . .

I'd slave at the piano for five hours daily. Linda would practice far less. Yet somehow she always shined as the star performer of our school.

It was frustrating. What does she have that I don't? I'd wonder.

Linda's best friend, Sheryl, bragged on and on to me, adding more fuel to my fire. "You could never be as good as Linda," she would taunt. "Linda's got Perfect Pitch."

"What's Perfect Pitch?" I asked.

Sheryl gloated about Linda's uncanny abilities: how she could name exact tones and chords -- all by ear; how she could sing any tone -- from memory alone; how she could play songs -- after just hearing them; the list went on and on . . .

My heart sank when the realization came to me. Her EAR is the key to her success. How could I ever hope to compete with her?

But it bothered me. Did she really have Perfect Pitch? How could she know tones and chords just by hearing them? It seemed impossible.

Finally I couldn't stand it anymore. So one day, I marched right up to Linda and asked her point-blank if she had Perfect Pitch.

"Yes," she nodded aloofly.

But Perfect Pitch was too good to believe. I rudely pressed, "Can I test you sometime?"

"OK," she replied.

Now she would eat her words . . .

My plot was ingeniously simple: When Linda least suspected, I walked right up and challenged her to name tones for me -- by ear.

I made her stand so she could not see the piano keyboard. I made sure other classmates could not help her. I set up everything perfectly so I could expose her Perfect Pitch claims as a ridiculous joke.

With silent apprehension, I selected a tone to play. (She'll never guess F#, I thought.) I had barely touched the key.

"F#," she said.

I was astonished.

I played another tone. "C," she announced, not stopping to think.

Frantically, I played more tones, skipping here and there all over the keyboard. But somehow she knew the pitch each time. She was AMAZING!

"Sing an Eb," I demanded, determined to mess her up. She sang a tone. I checked her on the keyboard -- and she was right on!

Now I started to boil. I called out more tones, trying hard to make them increasingly difficult. But she sang each note perfectly on pitch.

I was totally boggled. "How in the world do you do it?" I blurted.

"I don't know," she sighed. And that was all I could get out of her!

The dazzle of Perfect Pitch hit me like a ton of bricks. My head was dizzy with disbelief. Yet from then on, I knew that Perfect Pitch was real.

I couldn't figure it out. . .

"How does she DO it?" I kept asking myself. On the other hand, why can't everyone recognize and sing tones by ear?

Then it dawned on me. People call themselves musicians and yet they can't tell a C from a C#?? Or A major from F major?! That's as strange as a portrait painter who can't name the colors of paint on his palette! It all seemed odd and contradictory.

Humiliated and puzzled, I went home to work on this problem. At age 14, this was a hard nut to crack.

You can be sure I tried it out for myself. With a little sweet-talking, I'd get my three brothers and two sisters to play piano tones for me -- so I could try to name them by ear. But it always turned into a messy guessing game I just couldn't win.

Day after day I tried to learn those freaking tones. I would play a note over and over to make it stick in my head. But hours later I would remember it a half step flat. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn't recognize or remember any of the tones by ear. They all started to sound the same after awhile; how were you supposed to know which was which -- just by listening?

After weeks of work, I finally gave up. I would have done anything to have an ear like Linda, but now I thought it was just way beyond my reach.

Then it happened. . .

It was like a miracle . . . a twist of fate . . . like finding the lost Holy Grail. Once I stopped straining my ear, I started to listen NATURALLY. Then the secret to Perfect Pitch jumped right into my lap.

Curiously, I began to notice faint "colors" within the tones. Not visual colors, but colors of pitch, colors of sound. They had always been there. But this was the first time I had ever really "let go" -- and listened -- to discover these subtle differences.

Soon -- to my own disbelief -- I too could name the tones by ear! It was simple. I could hear how F# sounds one way, while Bb has a totally different sound -- sort of like "hearing" red and blue!

The realization struck me. THIS IS PERFECT PITCH!

This is how Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart could mentally envision their masterpieces -- and know tones, chords, and keys -- all by ear!

It was almost childish -- I felt sure that anyone could unlock their own Perfect Pitch with this simple secret of "Color Hearing." Bursting with excitement, I told my best friend, Ann (a flutist).

She laughed at me. "You have to be born with Perfect Pitch," she asserted. "You can't develop it."

"You don't understand Perfect Pitch," I countered. I showed her how to listen. Timidly, she confessed that she too could hear the pitch colors. With this jump start, Ann soon realized she had also gained Perfect Pitch. The story continues . . .

Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ PerfectPitch.com (January 1, 2005)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0942542584
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0942542585
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 12.8 ounces
  • Customer Reviews:
    3.4 out of 5 stars 19 ratings

Customer reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
3.4 out of 5
19 global ratings
How are ratings calculated?

Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on October 19, 2016
Verified Purchase
One person found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2015
Verified Purchase
One person found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on December 27, 2012
Verified Purchase
2 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on July 23, 2012
Verified Purchase
6 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on December 2, 2016
5 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on March 23, 2017
4 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on February 25, 2012
10 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on April 1, 2012
7 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Pages with related products. See and discover other items: perfect pitch