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Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant (Volume 1) Hardcover – December 19, 1998

4.4 out of 5 stars 140 customer reviews

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Hardcover, December 19, 1998
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ulysses S. Grant was a successful military general and the eighteenth President of the United States. A graduate of the prestigious West Point military academy, Grant served in both the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) and the American Civil War (1861-1865), in which he was appointed commander of the Union Army. Grant's successful military campaign against the Confederate States, executed by Union Generals William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Sheridan, and George Thomas, culminated in his acceptance of General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox courthouse on April 9, 1865.

First elected President in 1869, Grant's two presidential terms focused on reconstruction, further stabilizing the nation socially, politically, and economically following the end of the Civil War. His government successfully passed the Fifteenth Amendment, protecting voting rights for Africa-American citizens, pursued an Indian peace policy and created the Board of Indian Commissioners, and shut down the Whiskey Ring, recovering over $3 million in embezzled federal taxes. Grant died of cancer in 1885 and is interred at New York's Riverside Park in Grant's Tomb.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 596 pages
  • Publisher: Digital Scanning Inc. (December 19, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582181896
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582181899
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (140 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,705,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
General Grant wrote this book while dying of throat cancer. He had been swindled by a dishonest Wall Street Broker and his trophies and possessions were stripped from him to satisfy the demands of his debtors. Bankrupt, suffering from a terminal illness and never passing a moment without acute pain, he produced this magnificent monument to his greatness. Those who denigrate Grant as a drunkard, butcher, bumbling President need to read this book in order to correct these errant assumptions. It is impossible to read this book and not realize that Grant was an inordinately intelligent man and one hell of a writer.
Grant's Memoirs are a deserved classic in American literature and considered the greatest military Memoirs ever penned, exceeding Caesar's Commentaries. Grant wrote as he lived: with clear, concise statements, unembellished with trivialities or frivolities. The only "criticism" the reader might have is that Grant bent over backwards not to wound the feelings of people in the book. He takes swipes at Joe Hooker and Jeff Davis, but what he left unsaid would have been far more interesting. A compelling and logical reason why Grant was so spare in his comments was because he was involved in a race with death. He didn't know how long he could live and therefore, "cut to the chase."
Grant's assessments of Lincoln, Sherman, Sheridan and other military leaders are brilliant and engrossing. His style, like the man himself, was inimitable and couldn't be copied. In everyday life, Grant was a very funny man, who liked to listen to jokes and tell them himself. His sense of the absurd was acute. It's no accident that he loved Mark Twain and the two hitched together very well.
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Format: Kindle Edition
President Grant wrote this memoir near the end of his life and it was a huge success, selling enough copies to help his family financially after he was gone. He does an excellent job of describing his improbably rise to success in the Union Army during the Civil War.

For those of us who know nothing about warfare, his description of the campaigns will be real eye-openers. In this age of instant communications, we don't often think about the logistical problems of coordinating an attack. If you arrange an attack at a particular time of day, you can't rely on accurate watches. For one assault, his written instructions were for another general to attack an army from the other side when they heard his army open fire. Distance, a trick of the wind, and fog can all prevent the other army from hearing the fighting.

He also goes into detail about the huge logistical efforts involved in his campaigns. He spends considerable time addressing the belief that the South had better generals.

Read it and decide for yourself.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I concur with the first reviewer: this book made a civilian like myself understand a bit more of the complexity of any military campaign. In the subsequent sections (speaking of the free Kindle version) Grant also gives his opinion on a variety of subjects of national importance, though there is next to nothing of his time in the White House.

This transcription is quite good; here and there there are a few errors but they are not so frequent as to destroy the flow of the narrative.
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Format: Hardcover
General Grant wrote this book while dying of throat cancer. He had been swindled by a dishonest Wall Street Broker and his trophies and possessions were stripped from him to satisfy the demands of his debtors. Bankrupt, suffering from a terminal illness and never passing a moment without acute pain, he produced this magnificent monument to his greatness. Those who denigrate Grant as a drunkard, butcher, bumbling President need to read this book in order to correct these errant assumptions. It is impossible to read this book and not realize that Grant was an inordinately intelligent man and one hell of a writer.
Grant's Memoirs are a deserved classic in American literature and considered the greatest military Memoirs ever penned, exceeding Caesar's Commentaries. Grant wrote as he lived: with clear, concise statements, unembellished with trivialities or frivolities. The only "criticism" the reader might have is that Grant bent over backwards not to wound the feelings of people in the book. He takes swipes at Joe Hooker and Jeff Davis, but what he left unsaid would have been far more interesting. A compelling and logical reason why Grant was so spare in his comments was because he was involved in a race with death. He didn't know how long he could live and therefore, "cut to the chase."
Grant's assessments of Lincoln, Sherman, Sheridan and other military leaders are brilliant and engrossing. His style, like the man himself, was inimitable and couldn't be copied. In everyday life, Grant was a very funny man, who liked to listen to jokes and tell them himself. His sense of the absurd was acute. It's no accident that he loved Mark Twain and the two hitched together very well.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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