Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 17 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Philip K. Dick and Philos... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Connecting readers with great books since 1972. Customer service is our top priority!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Philip K. Dick and Philosophy: Do Androids Have Kindred Spirits? (Popular Culture and Philosophy) Paperback – October 18, 2011

4.4 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.95
$7.86 $4.99

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$24.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Philip K. Dick and Philosophy: Do Androids Have Kindred Spirits? (Popular Culture and Philosophy)
  • +
  • The Shifting Realities of Philip K. Dick: Selected Literary and Philosophical Writings
Total price: $39.23
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

D. E. Wittkower is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Old Dominion University, where he teaches philosophy of technology and computer ethics. He is author of The Philosopher's Book of Questions and Answers, and also edited Facebook and Philosophy, Mr. Monk and Philosophy, and iPod and Philosophy.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Popular Culture and Philosophy (Book 63)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Open Court (October 18, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812697340
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812697346
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,407,831 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Adam J. Nicolai on March 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'll preface this review by saying I'm not a philosopher in the strictest sense: I never studied it in school beyond incidental exposure and a single 101 class, and I'm certainly not a professor. But I don't think you need to be to enjoy Philip K. Dick and Philosophy. There are a lot of cool ideas that dovetail off of those presented in Dick's work and the movies based off of them (after reading Ethan Mills' chapter "Hollywood Doesn't Know Dick" I am careful to draw that distinction!), so if you enjoy either, you'll probably enjoy the book as much as I did.

I did find myself skipping a chapter here and there ("Yes, I get it, I can't prove the world is real - but I only have a 30 minute lunch break, folks, let's get to something new!") but the vast majority of the essays here are novel, interesting, and thought-provoking. I particularly enjoyed "Just Who And How Many Are You?" by Richard Feist, which, in part, explores a study looking at the duality of the human brain. The ramifications of this study are fascinating. The two sides of your brain are far more independent than you probably realize. Different enough to bring up the question: Are you actually two people or one person?

The book delves deeply into the ideas presented in "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" (or "Bladerunner" as we Hollywood Luddites may think of it); by the end of the book I was pretty well convinced that we probably ARE all robots, but that I really didn't mind.

Overall, it's well worth your time and nicely segmented, so if you do get philosophy overload but are still enjoying yourself, it's no big deal to put it down for a couple weeks and pick it up when your brain is ready for another thrashing.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I spent more time Reading "Philip K. Dick and Philosophy: Do Androids Have Kindred Spirits?" than I expected to and it wasn't because I didn't enjoy the book. I spent time understanding the different philosophers and philosophies, and essentially re-adapting/reorganizing what I know about Philip K. Dick to the idea of the philosophizing storyteller (which is referred to several times in the book). I think looking at Dick's work from the eye of a philosopher in addition to the eye of a literary critic brings much value to his works that I never imagined before.

The book consists of a series of topics each containing about three to four essays on that topic. Each of the essays is written by different academics so there is variety in the work that you wouldn't have in a book written by one person. There were some essays that I didn't like as much as others but overall I enjoyed the writing and I learned about many different philosophers, some I'd heard of or knew about and some I hadn't. My background is in literature so I am accustomed to approaching writing from the literary critic or the English major/academic and this is the first philosophy of... book I've read so this shift of focus was new to me but I welcomed it.

Some of my criticisms of the book center around the essays that discussed the movies to explain philosophies (with exception of the section on Hollywood) but aren't clear that the movies may be more or less faithful to the original story. The most guilty of these movies and the most often discussed are Adjustment Bureau, Minority Report, and Total Recall. I also have a background in Film Studies and I generally to believe that the director is the "author" of the movie so the implication that the ideas are Dick's didn't work for me.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Being old enough to remember when PKD was alive and writing, I have seen his works fade, then be re-discovered. I liked them then, and have found more depth in them with the passage of time. This collection helps me understand why.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful panorama of reviews and analyses of many of PKD's works. The diversity of opinion is illuminating. Whereas I may not agree with all authors' ideas, I credit them their thoughtful presentations.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I have a few books that look at philosophy and pop culture entertainment. Sometimes these books seem a little incongruent and even pretentious - does Plato really have all that much to say about "Buffy the Vampire Slayer?" The works of Philip K Dick and philosophy, however, are a natural fit. Dick studied philosophy and his fictional writing was influenced by the philosophical ideas of Plato, Spinoza, Heidegger, Bergson and quite a few others. Hence, the sci-fi subject matter of many of Dick's writings focus quite directly on some of the great philosophical issues - What is the nature of reality? How do we know if someone has consciousness? What does it mean to be a person? Do we really possess free will? What is free will in a deterministic universe? What does it mean to be an ethical person? What is the nature of time? All these weighty philosophical ideas in the context of Dick's fiction are examined by the various authors of this book. The result is that the philosophical subject matter flows naturally from the body of Dick's writings. I found all the articles in this book worth a read but four of my favourites were - Gerard Casey's discussion on Dick's questions regarding what is reality and possibility of there being multiple realities; Paul Atkinson's discussion on Dick's use of seeing the future or precognition in his stories and how it relates to Henri Bergson's philosophical account of the future in lived experience; Mathew McCall's look at Dick's VALIS in relation to the philosopher Spinoza, the nature of god, free will and psychological well-being and Heath Massey's look at Nietzsche's notion of Eternal Recurrence - our temporal experience eternally repeating - in relation to Dick's rather intriguing notions on time having both a linear dimension and non-linear dimension.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Philip K. Dick and Philosophy: Do Androids Have Kindred Spirits? (Popular Culture and Philosophy)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Philip K. Dick and Philosophy: Do Androids Have Kindred Spirits? (Popular Culture and Philosophy)