Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem 1st Edition, Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0226051963
ISBN-10: 022605196X
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“The problem of demarcation—distinguishing credible science from pseudoscience—is a crucial one, but one that has generally been neglected in recent philosophy of science. It is the issue that underlies such topical debates as that between evolutionists and creationists or intelligent design theorists, for example. This volume does a great service by bringing an impressive range of leading philosophers of science from a wide variety of perspectives to reconsider the issue. It is much to be hoped that its publication will spark a revival of interest in this vital issue.” 
(John Dupre University of Exeter)

Philosophy of Pseudoscience is a remarkable contribution to one of the most vexing problems in science: the ‘demarcation’ problem, or how to distinguish science from nonscience. The well-designed diversity of topics and the collective breadth of knowledge of the authors make this book the most comprehensive and authoritative treatise on a majority of the traditional and current demarcation issues. . . . You have a jewel in your hands.” 
(Francisco J. Ayala University of California, Irvine)

"A manual to overcome our natural cognitive biases."
(Corriere della Sera (Italy))

“If the philosophical problem of demarcating science from pseudoscience has a stale reputation, this book is a revitalizing gust of fresh air. Philosophers Pigliucci and Boudry assemble 23 essays that challenge Larry Laudan’s famous 1983 proclamation of the demarcation problem’s demise. Renewed attention to the philosophical questions that pseudoscience raises mirrors an uptick in interest in pseudoscience among historians, as exemplified by Michael Gordin’s The Pseudoscience Wars. Complementing such work, these essays bring focused attention to the practice and historical development of science. . . . A superb introduction to foundational questions that every philosophy student should confront. . . . Accessibly written . . . intellectually adventurous. . . . Essential.”
(J. D. Martin, University of Minnesota Choice)

“In Gary Larson’s cartoon ‘Scientist Hell,’ a smirking devil ushers an apprehensive man (beard, spectacles, white lab coat) into a room of nattering enthusiasts. The sign on the door reads, ‘Psychics, Astrologists & Mediums Eternal Discussion Group.’ If a similar room awaits philosophers, the present volume might come in handy.”
(Martin Curd, Purdue University Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews)

About the Author

Massimo Pigliucci is the K. D. Irani Professor of Philosophy at the City College of New York. He is the author of many books, including, most recently, How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life.

Product details

  • File Size: 1902 KB
  • Print Length: 479 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (August 16, 2013)
  • Publication Date: August 16, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00EARH246
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray for Textbooks:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,162,952 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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