Phineas Redux (Penguin Classics) Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Novel by Anthony Trollope, first published serially from July 1873 to January 1874 and in two volumes in 1874. It is a sequel to Phineas Finn and the fourth of the PALLISER NOVELS. The narrative begins after Finn's wife, Mary, has died in childbirth. He resumes his political career and again becomes romantically involved with Lady Laura Standish (now Kennedy) and Madame Marie Max Goesler, whom he eventually marries. An ethical and kind man, Finn is falsely accused of the murder of a rival politician. Eventually acquitted, he leaves political life in disgust. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature

About the Author

Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was a prolific and popular novelist who simultaneously maintained a successful career as a civil servant in the Post Office. He wrote 47 novels during his life, the most famous of which are the six Chronicles of Barsetshire and the six 'Palliser' novels. His fiction is regarded as presenting the most convincing picture of the lives of the landed and professional classes in the 19th century.

Gregg Hechimovich teaches English at Seattle University.

Product Details

  • File Size: 811 KB
  • Print Length: 342 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1115872672
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Public Domain Books (June 21, 2006)
  • Publication Date: June 21, 2006
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000SN6JCC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,412,039 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A. Trollope considered himself a conservative liberal, i.e. he sided with the Whigs against the Tories.
This novel of 1871, the fourth in the six volume Palliser series, is one of his most political ones insofar as AT takes sides in an issue. In many other books of his, he stays away from issues, on the sideline; his tales are about procedures and relations and morality.
The issue in question here is `disestablishment', what we call `separation of state and church' in modern times. Since Tudor times (more specifically Elizabethan times), the Anglican Church was `established' legally by drawing state guaranteed revenue from the population, a church tax. Catholics in Ireland were unhappy with that. In 1868, Gladstone, a liberal PM, `disestablished' the Anglican Church in Ireland.
Trollope, in support of this separation, twists the plot of this novel to a new and surprising direction: he lets the Tories, rather than the Whigs propose disestablishment, and they do it for the whole kingdom, not just Ireland. In consequence, the liberals in parliament find themselves between a rock and a hard place: do they support a measure introduced by the conservatives? The horror!
Or do they vote against their own convictions? Well, what are convictions anyway!?
Any similarity to partisanship in other countries' parliaments is purely accidental.

One of the little niceties of the Palliser series is the humorous way in which we watch Plantagenet Palliser, at times finance minister, later prime minister, fight for his pet project, the decimal coinage. This shows AT as a true prophet, a century ahead of time. It would take until 1971 for the UK to introduce a decimal currency!
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Format: Paperback
When I read Book 2 of the Palliser series, Phineas Finn, I thought it was by far the most delightful Trollope novel I had ever encountered. So I was understandably looking forward to this direct sequel, Phineas Redux although I doubted it could be as enjoyable, as the book that came between them, The Eustace Diamonds, was rather unpleasant. I'm glad to say that Phineas Redux is a great book, perhaps even the best Trollope novel I have read (this is my thirteenth).

This book is really very different from Phineas Finn. It's much darker and contains dramatic elements not usually found in Trollope. Some parts of the book seem to fit Dostoevsky's novels quite well. But, rather strangely, the book is also very funny. I think Trollope's genius shone brightly here. Unfortunately though, you may have to read The Eustace Diamonds as two characters from that book play important roles in this one.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a reasonable version of the text. As usual for the low cost versions, there are no end-notes or commentary, so if you're not familiar with the period or Trollope's style of writing you may find yourself challenged (although the availability of your digital dictionary helps). The major drawback of this version is in the limited formatting. Trollope relies extensively on letters exchanged between characters and this version does not format the letters separately from the main text. As such, this version is OK for the general reader, but probably not the edition of choice for students or scholars.
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Not as much fun as the other Palliser novels. But there is a good trial scene - good details about the court system of the time. I think there is one more novel in this series to go.
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