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Pinstripe Patronage: Political Favoritism from the Clubhouse to the White House and Beyond Hardcover – September 30, 2010

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The process of patronage-performing favors and offering lucrative positions or rewards to people who raise money or offer service-has always been a part of government, but not to the extent that it is in American politics today, argue the Tolchins in this fascinating exposé. Once defined by reliable blue-collar jobs and gifts of food to the poor, patronage has moved into the boardroom and grown exponentially in worth and influence. What's particularly troubling in an era of growing deficits and cries for "smaller government" is that responsibilities once undertaken by the state are being outsourced, often without bidding, to private companies with no oversight or qualification beyond their campaign contributions. The Tolchins have studied Washington for years and it shows in a thoughtfully researched exploration of a radically changing game. Though the authors acknowledge the pros and cons of their subject, they are surprisingly nonpartisan and free of judgment; they're not here to condemn, but rather to call for a return to transparency, and readers will likely be fascinated and frightened in equal measure, regardless of where they fall on the political spectrum.
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What differentiates good patronage from bad patronage? Marty and Sue Tolchin’s book lays it all out for the interested voter. (―Ed Koch, Former New York City mayor)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (September 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594515921
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594515927
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.9 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,861,418 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By John Boffa on August 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book provides extraordinary insights into the workings of political patronage, through the centuries and in many different types of jurisdictions. The authors demonstrate that patronage is not just at work in the traditional urban political machines most of us know, where blue-collar jobs are spread out among many households. It's also evident in very sophisticated ways at the highest levels of large corporations, which are rewarded for remembering the right politicians. After reading the book, one realizes patronage is pervasive, and probably impossible to eliminate. Well-researched and well-written, a "must read" for anyone with a desire to understand the dynamics of patronage and how it oils the political process in America and elsewhere.
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Format: Hardcover
Definitely a 5 star effort and a must read for every political reporter and
> political science major.
>
> As a government practicioner and observer of the Washington scene, I thought
> that I knew and had seen it all. Pinstripe Patronage reveals, however, that
> there is too much that I have missed. This is a must read for anyone
> interested in good government and reforming the current system. Martin and
> Susan Tolchin have raised a number of important questions that must be
> addressed. If their research doesn't stir things up, then, political reform
> is a moot issue.
>
> Neal P. Gillen
> Potomac, Maryland
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Format: Hardcover
The trend of political payoffs has been growing. Pinstripe Patronage gave me a deep understanding of the behind the scenes in Washington. This is one of the best books on politics I have read in a long time. A must read.
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