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The Poet of Tolstoy Park: A Novel (Reader's Circle) Paperback – March 28, 2006

4.5 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A dying man's decision to move from Idaho to Alabama becomes a quixotic spiritual journey in Brewer's ruminative, idiosyncratic first novel, based on a true story. In 1925, widowed Henry Stuart learns that he has tuberculosis and will probably be dead within a year. Stuart's initial reaction is optimistic resignation, as he regards his illness as a final philosophical journey of reconciliation, one that sends him back through the writings of his beloved Tolstoy and other literary and spiritual figures to find solace and comfort. Despite the protests of his two sons and his best friend, he decides to move to the progressive town of Fairhope, Ala. There, he begins to build a round, domed cottage where he seeks to "learn in solitude how to save myself" and earns himself the sobriquet "the poet of Tolstoy Park." The plot, such as it is, runs out of steam when Brewer makes an ill-advised decision to jump forward in time in the last chapters, but the heady blend of literary and philosophical references and some fine character writing make this a noteworthy debut.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

First-novelist Brewer chronicles the real-life journey of Henry Stuart, who, in 1925 at the age of 67, is diagnosed with consumption and told he only has a year to live. Henry decides to leave his home in Idaho and bid his two grown sons and best friend good-bye before his decline begins. Henry chooses a small plot of land in Fairhope, Alabama, as his final residence, and he corresponds with a man named Peter Stedman in order to get the supplies to build a house. On the train to Alabama, Henry gives his shoes away to a porter and determines to live out the rest of his days in solitude. But life might have other plans for him: on the final leg of his journey he meets a friendly schoolteacher named Kate, and Peter also seeks to develop a rapport with Henry. Henry tries to shut them all out until one life-altering night gives him a new perspective. Fans of quiet, philosophical novels will find much to enjoy in Henry's musings and revelations. Kristine Huntley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Reader's Circle
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (March 28, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345476328
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345476326
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #148,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Publisher's Weekly, et al, above have given a good summation of the book (kind of sort of) above, so I won't go into that. I will say that I enjoyed this one a lot. The author's wonderful style/syntax are from another day. They are quite reminiscent of the writings of David Grayson (Ray Stannard Baker). Mr. Brewer gives us a wonderful collection of characters, drifting through the life of Henry Stewart, a very real person, so I understand. I think it is important to note and remember the age of the man being written about here. So much written today about men and women in advanced age is rather depressing, at the very least, but here we have wonderful book of hope and one of more realism as to the aging process. Being of "advanced age" myself, I rather like this. Like a previous reviewer, I would have loved to have visited with Henry (more to listen than to talk) and am sure I would have been in line to sign his guest book. I very much recommend this one for any person wanting a nice quiet read, full of thought and one that is very well written. I do hope we get more from this author. Thank you Mr. Brewer!
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Format: Hardcover
I can hardly keep my eyes open this morning, as I pulled a rare late-nighter reading this awesome, inspiring, beautifully written novel.

This is the tale of Henry James Stuart, who when he heard that he was dying of consumption and had only a year to live, decided to leave the cold climate of Idaho for Fairhope, Alabama. His wife had died a few years before and his two sons were grown, so Henry was itching for some adventure in the last days of his life, and he also didn't want to burden his sons with having to care for him. Henry is a practical, no-nonsense, seminary-educated disciple of Tolstoy, Black Elk and Chief Seattle, albeit a quiet, unassuming man whose simple life spoke much louder than his words. In magical, luminous words, he brings to life his hilltop on Mobile Bay where, when inspired by watching a pair of Ospreys build their nest, he decides to build a circular house. In struggling to come to terms with his impending death, he instead, discovers life and how to live it.

This is a must-read and a must-own tome! I plan to read it over and over again. Thank you, Mr. Brewer, for such a magnificant work of literature!!!
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Format: Hardcover
I loved this book, and for many reasons. It is finely written and nicely conceived. It honors reflection and solitude, in ways our modern society has largely ignored. It pays homage to the importance of community, at a time when too many of us fly about in frenzied and hurried fashion, self-absorbed. It values a life of simplicity, much like Thoreau fashioned on Walden Pond. Finally, it shines a glorious light on courage and resilience in the autumn and winter of one's days, that time when we face our mortality.

Henry Stuart is quirky and independent, hermetic yet endearing, thoughtful and inclusive of others, despite his intentions otherwise. He cherishes honest and thoughtful interaction with others. He'll grant others their oddities if only they'll grant him his.

Like another lingering, sauntering work, "Cold Mountain," we know where the story is going and enjoy the telling for what it is, a poetic and reflective journey lived one day at a time, one task at a time, offered like a hymn of praise.

I savored the language and the thought, often reading a half-dozen pages and putting the book down so that I could ruminate properly, much as Stuart would do. This is one of those books in my library that I'll treasure, often running my fingers down its spine and smiling as I enjoy a moment of memory and the anticipation of reading it again.

My hat's off to Sonny Brewer for making the time to craft such a fine novel. He has brought credit to himself and Fairhope in the process. He loves words and books, writing and ideas, Fairhope and community -- that's obvious. I'm grateful that he shared so generously.
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Format: Hardcover
If you are looking for a book to savor, buy The Poet of Tolstoy Park. The protagonist, Henry Stuart, teaches us about living and dying when he leaves his old life in Idaho and moves to Fairhope, Alabama. Henry learns to live in the moment while he builds a round hut, sets privacy-boundaries with his new friends (an ongoing battle in most of our lives), and does what he loves most: reads, writes, and weaves. And he does it all without his boots! Along the way, Henry's health improves, his friendships deepen, and the barefoot poet finds peace in dying.

Sonny Brewer has written a beautiful story and, like a poet, has given his readers plenty to ponder.
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Format: Hardcover
I loved this book so much I went looking for the author's website and sent him a note. I figured doing so might serve a double purpose: 1) let the writer know his work was enjoyed, 2) cast a vote for the values that drive the story -- such as I see them. Here's what I had to say Sonny Brewer:

Just wanted to say that "The Poet of Tolstoy Park" has rendered me incapable of starting another book. I finished on Saturday and have since been unable to let myself be drawn away from Henry Stuart, Tolstoy Park, and Fairhope. "The Confessions of Max Tivoli" sits on my bedside table, and though I'd been very

eager to read it, I now find I haven't the will. I want to savor your book awhile longer.

By my reckoning, such as its worth, "The Poet of Tolstoy Park" is a thing of beauty, grace, and wisdom. And humor, too. In fact, I'm puzzled that the reviews I've read, both editorial and reader reviews, fail to mention the delightful humor.

I'm even more puzzled, however, that I haven't read one review that mentions the "community" theme. That we are all connected, and that in our acknowledgment of our connectedness, and in our service to one another, we can best live a good life and thus best die, seems to me the heart of the story.

I suppose we all see in the world around us what we see in our heads, and I've just finished writing a novel in which community is a central theme, so it may be my unique perspective to see it as the heart of your book . . .

But surely Henry's conviction that humankind's hope lies not in Christianity, nor any institutionalized religion or social philosophy, Tolstoy's included, but in our Christian treatment of one another, was not an insignificant bit of character detail.

I digress.
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