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The Poetic Edda

2.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0889467835
ISBN-10: 0889467838
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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Icelandic
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 472 pages
  • Publisher: Edwin Mellen Pr (November 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0889467838
  • ISBN-13: 978-0889467835
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,271,433 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Ryan on December 28, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Technically, this is Bellows's translation, but formatted poorly. Other editions actually put spaces in between the lines of poetry. And do a better job of separating the footnotes from the stanzas.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is probably my biggest source for the Lore of the Norse people. It is one of the oldest collections of these stories, you feel a connection to the gods when reading about them here. Some will say it is dry but I have never found that to be the case. These vital and vibrant stories merit being read in their most original form. Whether you are Asatru reading religiously or just studying Norse mythology this is where you should start.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This translation uses nonstandard terms which do not conform to the common English terms used for most of the characters and places. Bellows actually points out that this is done deliberately, and even that it will "undoubtedly perplex and annoy those who have become accustomed to one or another of the current methods of anglicising Old Norse names." For example, Bellows translates "Oþin" as "Othin." While this is quite likely truer to the original sound of the word "Oþin", it does not match the English "Odin", nor the more commonly accepted Old Norse version: Óðinn. In fact, it does not even match the current name "Oden" in use in Scandinavia. Many other names have been "less" or differently translated, such as "Baldr" (Baldur, or Balder in common Scandinavian usage), "Voluspo" (Voluspa). A few take a while to figure out what they mean, such as "Mithgard" (apparently Miþgardr, commonly translated as Midgard in English, Midgård in Sweden, from the generally accepted Old Norse "Miðgarðr"). Someone who is more of scholar of Old Norse might actually question the accuracy of Bellow's interpretation of the original.

Some may appreciate this translation. For me, at least, this translation was intrusive enough to go look for a different translation of the Poetic Edda.
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