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I Saw Poland Betrayed. American Opinion Reprint Paperback – 1961

4.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Robert Welch (1961)
  • ASIN: B00352P0KK
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,465,548 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
This book is much more than an account of the disgraceful sellout of Poland to the Soviet Union by the west and the brutal imposition of a Soviet puppet state. It is nothing less than a one-volume history of Poland from 1944-1947. It provides so much detail in just one book, and includes such things as pictures of then-General Eisenhower's visit to Poland.

Lane devotes some detail to the double-dealing of Roosevelt behind the Poles' backs. The sellout of Poland included President Roosevelt openly lying to Polish-American leader Charles Rozmarek, even using a prewar map of Poland as part of the deception (p. 96).

Throughout his travels across Poland, Lane was keenly aware of the terror created by the Communist secret police (U. B., or UB). He clearly realized the fact that free elections were unimaginable under such circumstances, long before the farcical elections of January 17, 1947 that officially brought the Communists to power. Soon thereafter, Lane could not take it any more. He resigned his position as ambassador in order that he could freely speak to Americans about the crime of betrayal that had been done to Poland.

Lane (p. 181) pointed out that the definition of a Fascist was often very elastic: "...that some well-informed persons had even gone so far as to define a Fascist as a person not in one hundred per cent agreement with Communism." Left-wingers had used the term Fascist in this manner since time immemorial. Lane also includes a statement of Stalin saying that, whatever the negative American response, Americans will soon forget about it and move on to other things (p. 312). Ah, the more things change, the more they remain the same!

Lane provides some detail on the so-called Kielce Pogrom (pp. 246-251).
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Format: Paperback
I am not very familiar with the history of Poland or World War II, but have some experience with the cold war or anyway its ending. I found this book to be an excellent description of the terrible events in Poland at the end of the war and in the following few years. Because the plot was repeated across Eastern Europe with variations in the details but depressingly little in the outcome, it also serves to describe the origin of cold war. Lane was well positioned to observe the situation and reported it in detail. Because he was privy to US Government information through this period, he provides considerable insight into the political processes that formed US policy. His description of the evolving opinion on Stalin and the Soviet Union was built on a litany of details whose direction is clearer in hindsight than it must have been at the time. He was also present to view the plight of the Polish people and related numerous details of the German atrocities and depredations of the Red Army and the developing Polish police state.

The Peczkis review implies more emphasis on antisemitism in Lane's treatment than I saw. Antisemitism was addressed in some detail, but I didn't get the impression that Lane viewed it as a key issue in restoring Poland's political independence or geographic integrity. I was surprised to learn that the Soviets had put so many Jews in powerful positions of the puppet government. I wondered when reading about the Kielce Pogrom, if this wasn't part of the Soviet plan to sew discontent and inflame discord within their vassal states, but Lane properly didn't comment on their motives.

Lane's book is long on details, names, and descriptions and short on speculation.
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Great book long ignored by American Historians. Authur Lane books is great reading for all Americans especially WWII Vets and their families. Not only was freedom, democracy,and the Polish people especially those who fought along side of the Allies, but also all the American soldiers that died on D-Day for freedom and democracy for all people. WWII was started for the expressed purpose of saving Poland from German aggression and then after the War we abandoned the Polish people for over 50 years to Soviet aggression, where the Polish people were robbed, raped, and murdered by the Soviets and we in the Western world did NOTHING. Only General Patton was willing to speak out against this crime against the whole Humanity of the World and was willing to fight all the way to Moscow. We should have united with what was left of the Axis forces and gone immediately to War against USSR.
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Format: Paperback
This book is much more than an account for the disgraceful sellout of Poland to the Soviet Union by the west and the brutal imposition of a Soviet puppet state. It is nothing less than a one-volume history of Poland from 1944-1947. It provides so much detail in just one book, and includes such things as pictures of then-General Eisenhower's visit to Poland.

Lane devotes some detail to the double-dealing of Roosevelt behind the Poles' backs. The sellout of Poland included President Roosevelt openly lying to Polish-American leader Charles Rozmarek, even using a prewar map of Poland as part of the deception (p. 96). Throughout his travels across Poland, Lane was keenly aware of the terror created by the Communist secret police (U. B., or UB). He was well aware of the fact that free elections were unimaginable under such circumstances, long before the farcical elections of January 17, 1947 that officially brought the Communists to power. Soon thereafter, Lane would not take it any more. He resigned his position as ambassador in order that he could freely speak to Americans about the crime of betrayal that had been done to Poland.

Lane (p. 181) pointed out that the definition of a Fascist was often very elastic: "...that some well-informed persons had even gone so far as to define a Fascist as a person not in one hundred per cent agreement with Communism." Left-wingers had used the term Fascist in this manner since time immemorial. Lane also includes a statement of Stalin saying that, whatever the negative American response, Americans will soon forget about it and move on to other things (p. 312). Ah, the more things change, the more they remain the same!

Lane provides some detail on the so-called Kielce Pogrom (pp. 246-251).
Read more ›
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