& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
In Stock.
Sold by cdgiveaways and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Port Of Morrow has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Green Merchant
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Guaranteed - Discs inspected and polished - Thanks for looking!
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$6.66
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: J&S GAMES
Add to Cart
$6.88
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Add to Cart
$8.41
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: RetroResale
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Port Of Morrow

4.1 out of 5 stars 139 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Now with Prime Music Join Prime Prime Members
Port Of Morrow
"Please retry"
Streaming 
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, March 20, 2012
"Please retry"
$6.66
$2.01 $1.09

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started
$6.66 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details In Stock. Sold by cdgiveaways and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Port Of Morrow
  • +
  • Wincing the Night Away
  • +
  • Oh, Inverted World
Total price: $30.53
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Port of Morrow, the fourth album from The Shins, was recorded in Los Angeles and Portland over the course of 2011 with James Mercer as usual handling all songwriting duties, lead vocals and the majority of instrumentation. The record was produced by Greg Kurstin and mixed by Rich Costey. The cover art was created by Jacob Escobedo.
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
3:29
Play in Library $1.29
 
2
30
4:15
Play in Library $1.29
 
3
30
4:01
Play in Library $1.29
 
4
30
3:23
Play in Library $1.29
 
5
30
3:33
Play in Library $1.29
 
6
30
3:16
Play in Library $1.29
 
7
30
3:56
Play in Library $1.29
 
8
30
3:48
Play in Library $1.29
 
9
30
4:38
Play in Library $1.29
 
10
30
5:49
Play in Library $1.29
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 20, 2012)
  • Original Release Date: March 20, 2012
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Legacy
  • Run Time: 40 minutes
  • ASIN: B006VE679C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (139 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,081 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's The Shins Store

Music

Image of album by The Shins
Visit Amazon's The Shins Store
for 13 albums, discussions, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jacob A. Graber on April 10, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I see this record getting a lot of hate on here, and some misguided praise. NO, this is NOT the same Shins that exploded with indie-pop bliss on "Oh, Inverted World," twinkled with young-yet-wise cheekiness on "Chutes Too Narrow," or soared with symphonic scope on "Wincing the Night Away." Obviously, it isn't supposed to be. After "Wincing...," I doubted whether any further work by the Shins could surpass the masterful union of melody, instrumentation, and lyrical edge that was achieved on that third album. I was a little bit right. Truth is, the trajectory of mad energy and spontaneous musicality that marked the Shins' early years could not continue forever. There is a time for all artists when youth and restlessness inevitably fade; greatness lingers for those who stay focused on the craft and allow their art to change with them, while lesser performers continue to rely on a style they can no longer pull off convincingly. With "Port of Morrow," James Mercer lands himself squarely in the former camp, which should be a relief to Shins' fans everywhere. Come on guys, of course the music was gonna change! Is "Port of Morrow" a bit slicker, more produced, and lyrically transparent than former "all killer no filler" efforts? Yes, yes, and yes. But if you can't get down with the likes of "The Rifle's Spiral," "Bait and Switch," "September," and "40 Mark Strasse," then you're just plain not listening.
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A new Shins release is bound to be a big event, since the Portland-based band has only produced three earlier albums: "Oh, Inverted World" in 2001, "Chutes Too Narrow" in 2003, and the breakthrough "Wincing the Night Away" in 2007. Add a five-year hiatus, a new label (their own, a subsidiary of Columbia called Aural Apothecary), a new producer (Greg Kurstin, half of The Bird and The Bee), and a completely new lineup of bandmates (frontman James Mercer is the only constant), and fans are understandably curious as to whether the magic is still there.

The answer is yes. Mercer, one of the high priests of indie pop, is the heart and soul of The Shins. As he's entered his 40s and settled into domestic bliss (two kids), his music has inevitably changed. But since I've aged along with him, I can understand wanting to try new things and work with a variety of people. Gone -- or fired, if you prefer -- are the musicians he once played with: Martin Crandall on keyboards, Jesse Sandoval on drums, Dave Hernandez on bass. The new crew includes singer/songwriter Richard Swift, guitarist Jessica Dobson, Crystal Skulls bassist Yuuki Matthews, and Modest Mouse drummer Joe Plummer. Why didn't he simply drop the old name and call his new group the James Mercer Band? He clearly hoped to avoid losing Shins followers in the transition.

Perhaps as a result of maturity, "Port of Morrow" has a bit less energy, surprise, or spontaneity than the first three Shins albums, in which Mercer was discovering his gifts and exploring different ideas. This is more of an adult record, complex and layered, carefully calculated and orchestrated. As a consequence, some fans will surely deride it as mainstream, derivative, or dull.
Read more ›
4 Comments 63 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have to admit, I was really looking forward to this album. "Wincing the Night Away" was in my CD player (remember those?) for months--"Phantom Limb," "Girl Sailor," "Turn On Me"...there was something about the album that was simultaneously new, yet tapped into 50 years of R&R history.

Having listened to "Port of Morrow" a couple of times, I'm immediate struck by how, unlike earlier albums, all the rough edges have been sanded away, which is great from an easy listening point of view. Nothing to offend, nothing especially harsh (well, except for the falsetto on the title song). It's the sort of album that I imagine improves with repeated listenings.

However, unlike previous albums I don't hear the sort of band interplay that makes a great album. No terrific guitar parts, no sense that there was any input from other musicians. Like the whole thing sprung from Mercer's head complete and every part was crafted under his dictatorial command. Which is great as far as that goes, since Mercer is inventive and imaginative. Just not imaginative enough in my book when compared to the other albums. I don't have the sense that this is an album that will be on my heavy rotation list.
12 Comments 63 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I consider myself an absolutely huge music nerd, and I love bands as complex as Radiohead and dream-pop sensations, Beach House. In fact, most of the music I listen to is semi-experimental.

I also absolutely adore the Shins, or should I say, James Mercer. Their last two albums, Wincing & Chutes, we're filled with so much personality and creativity, so therefore, when I first listened to Port of Morrow, even knowing that most of the band had departed, I still expected more of the same whimsical melodies and unique sound that had made The Shins who they are. Unfortunately (at first) I was sadly disappointed. It felt like Mercer was selling out and trying to blend in with the money making crowd of Alt-pop bands.

But then I suspended everything I typically listen for when I listen to an album, and after about 5-10 listens, this turned into my favorite Shins album, and my favorite album so far in 2012. The minute you realize that this new Shins doesn't HAVE to be excessively unique like old Shins, you'll really hear how personal this album is, and how enjoyable it truly is. It's essentially Mercer growing up, and the sound grows up with him. I won't get into the lyrics too in-depth, but when you combine the more matured, toned down sound/production with the clearly personal lyrics (specifically on the later tracks about letting go of youthful habits and lessons learned Mercer intends to pass on to his children), you'll understand the reasoning and thought process behind Port of Morrow.

Also, the melodies themselves have never been better, specifically on "Simple Song, "It's Only Life," "No Way Down," and "40 Mark Strasse." (The album's best track) and after listening to this album probably a good 30+ times, I get attached to different songs each time.
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Port Of Morrow
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Port Of Morrow



Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: vinyl pop