Buy Used
$4.50
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Round3
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shipped next day from GA, United States. All products are inspected and playing quality guaranteed (excluding any digital content). Our friendly multilingual customer service team will be happy to resolve your queries.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Preservation Act 1 Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered

4.4 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Now with Prime Music Join Prime Prime Members
Preservation Act 1
"Please retry"
Streaming 
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, July 14, 1998
$19.98 $4.50

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

This CD is an out of print collectible! It is the 1998 remastered release with bonus tracks. The teeth on the clear insert tray are broken.

Amazon.com

The late '60s through the mid '70s represented the era of plot rock. From the Who's Tommy onward, plot-driven and suite-length character meditations were everywhere. The Kinks' approach to the rock musical was more conceptually measured than was the norm. The plot and drama behind Preservation, Act 1 and Act 2 are far more subtle investigations of class, culture, and commerce--even if they're couched in characters like rocker Johnny Thunder. The tussle of the Preservation drama is common enough--a citizenry pursuing goals in an increasingly competitive, even ruthless manner, while on the periphery is Mr. Black, who'll save the day and restore balance, and his antagonist, Flash, who seeks to pilfer the Village Green. Both emblematic of community and a direct link to the band's 1969 Village Green Preservation Society, the drama and characters make it far better to tune in for an entire CD rather than for just one song. But "Sweet Lady Genevieve" is a gentle, lovely tune, and so many other selections are, even for passive Kinks fans, important pieces. --Andrew Bartlett
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
2:00
Play in Library $0.99
 
2
30
3:20
Play in Library $0.99
 
3
30
3:26
Play in Library $0.99
 
4
30
3:00
Play in Library $0.99
 
5
30
3:28
Play in Library $0.99
 
6
30
4:29
Play in Library $0.99
 
7
30
2:56
Play in Library $0.99
 
8
30
7:01
Play in Library $0.99
 
9
30
2:40
Play in Library $0.99
 
10
30
3:47
Play in Library $0.99
 
11
30
4:08
Play in Library $0.99
 
12
30
3:37
Play in Library $0.99
 
13
30
4:06
Play in Library $0.99
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 14, 1998)
  • Original Release Date: 1973
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Velvel Records
  • ASIN: B000009DI3
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #393,829 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's The Kinks Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By James Choma VINE VOICE on October 18, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When this album first came out, I recall there being a lot of negative critical press surrounding it. Most of the confusion probably came from the fact that this was part one of a two part concept Ray Davies had based around the group's landmark "Village Green Preservation Society" album. I believe many of the comments were that the album didn't accomplish anything in particular and as a concept, went absolutely nowhere. Now that 30 (!!!) years have passed, Part 1 and 2 can be viewed as a whole and for the wonderful music contained therein.
"Preservation Part 1" is one of my all time favorite albums. I love everything about it: the storyline, the cover art, the music, the lyrics... they all work together to make a wonderful album.

"Daylight over the Village Green early in the morning.
Daylight over the hills and valleys heralding the morning.
Daylight over the mountains, daylight on the Village Green"

This albums works on so many levels for me, but what I like best is the "small country town" feel one gets hearing songs from all the locals' perspectives. With the brass and woodwind accompanyment, it almost sounds as if it was recorded at a local county fair. Nostalgia plays a big part in my appreciation of the album; I recall hearing the album as a child and growing up with it. In a way, that's one of the themes Ray was trying to get across: growing older, feeling nostalgic and appreciating life; something that probably didn't play too well at the time to young Kinks fans. Now, we're all older, wiser, and can identify with the music!
Highlights from the album are "Sweet Lady Genevieve," "There's a Change in the Weather," "Where are They Now?," "Cricket" and "Sitting in the Mid Day Sun". Just listening to the album from beginning to end is a pleasure.
If you're a fan of the Kinks and want to see how diverse they got musically and lyrically, look no further than this album and it's sequel, "Prevervation Act 2".
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I've been advised by several people to avoid Preservation Act 1 since apparently it's the worst album the Kinks made in the 70's. Supposedly Ray Davies was trying *so* hard to make a perfect rock opera of some sorts, that the songwriting suffers as a result. BUT... I strongly disagree!

The whole "rock opera" thing is a huge mystery to me. I seriously don't hear anything like that on here. I just hear what I've come to expect from the Kinks since the mid 60's- brilliant pop songwriting.

I don't hear any overblown musical ideas, I don't even hear a rock opera either (at least, there doesn't seem to be a concept of any sorts and even if there *is* one, it's not really meaningful enough to criticize it) and to be completely honest, this album just sounds to me like yet *another* solid, underrated album by a rock band STILL struggling to stand alongside the other mighty rock giants, such as the Who and the Beatles.

So basically, I don't get all the hate for Preservation Act One at *all*.

I love track one. I think you'll understand what the lyrics are about immediately, and perhaps even be able to relate to them rather strongly. "Morning Song" made me cry the first time I heard it. Seriously, this particular track sounds NOTHING like what you'd expect the Kinks to write since it's not a pop song of any sorts- it's just two people humming the most spiritually moving melody imaginable.

"Daylight" is a highly melodic pop song, "Sweet Lady Genevieve" makes me CRY it's so incredibly good, and "There's a Change in the Weather" is a weird song at first because of the way Ray delivers the vocal lines. Eventually though, this track won me over.

"Where Are They Now?
Read more ›
3 Comments 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on June 24, 1999
Format: Audio CD
A most lovable record. Worth exploring. There are about three true Kinks classics on this one; "One of the Survivors," "Sitting in the Midday Sun," and the sublime "Sweet Lady Genevieve." The rest of it is most listenable, however, and the addition of horns and a vocal ensemble gives this disk a unique musical quality in the Kinks' canon. An odd track, "Cricket," is told in the voice of a parson, backed by tuba, acoustic guitar and trumpet -- lots of fun. The lyric writing reaches for and sometimes achieves the level of poetry.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
"Preservation" Act I and Act II are among the best albums the Kinks have to offer (see my review of Act II for additional comments). They capture everything that makes the Kinks great. Quirky, offbeat, melodic, humorous and moving. Don't believe the critics. As "rock opera" this is far superior to "Tommy" or "The Wall".
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Eric Thompson on September 23, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I don't think I'll ever understand why so many Kinks fans seem to dislike this album so. My best guess is that, at least in the most traditional sense, it "rocks" slightly less than many of their other works. Overall the music seems even more introspective, nostalgia-soaked and understated than Ray Davies is typically known for, which is saying quite a bit.

Aside from this, it is my opinion that "Preservation: Act 1" quite frankly features some of the most heartfelt playing and songwriting of The Kinks' career. The ingenious musical arrangements and interplay that they had developed over the previous years is still in full swing here, and such inspiring songs as "Daylight," "Sweet Lady Genevieve," and "Where Are They Now?" will have you singing along in just a few listens.

Bear in mind that, as other reviews have stated, this is more than just a run-of-the-mill "rock and roll" record. Be prepared to REALLY LISTEN to the music and allow yourself to be carried off by it, rather than just put it on in the background. My guess is that Kinks fans who enjoy a greater variety of music than simply rock - specifically "classical" and prog - will be more receptive to this album's charms.

Happy listening.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums