Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The Principle of Relevance 1st Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-9889975821
ISBN-10: 9889975823
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy new
$19.97
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
7 New from $19.97
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Qty:1
The Principle of Relevanc... has been added to your Cart
More Buying Choices
7 New from $19.97 15 Used from $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$19.97 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

If you often find yourself in information overload, this Principle, when mastered can change your life. As a logical, linear thinker, I had to laugh at how the author pegged my actions and the urgency of my distractions. Stefania provides tools to assist all of us in breaking the habits that keep us from being truly effective. --Judy Irving, Executive Coach, Moving On, USA

It's hard to define Stefania's work: it is not simply a book, certainly not a manual, for sure not a guide. This book is most of all an experience for those who recognize how hard is the job of living in a world where information does not match with knowledge and knowledge does not match with comprehension. Her way - the principle of relevance - is the key to convert information from a chaotic and shapeless mass into an instrument to empower ourselves, our capabilities and our ambitions, whatever they are, professional or private. However, Stefania went on and, starting from her own experience, poses a fundamental question to us: in the age of information, where everything is immediately accessible, what are we looking for, really? In a very easy way, she drives us back to our purposes and the true meaning of our searches, pushing ahead a fundamental concept: whatever the focus of our search is on and whatever its purpose is, we must always start from ourselves and not from external data. --Maria Cristina Ferradini, Director, Legal Department, Vodafone Italy

The book lives up to its name. To discover that it also excelled at offering practical, best practice advice was an absolute blessing. Navigating the streams of information that now cascade towards us is not realistic. With the aid of the ideas and solutions laid out in easy to follow steps, the readers will hone their new media; instincts. A fascinating and educational book. --Nick West, Head of Conferences and Events, Financial Times, Asia Pacific

Most of us are flooded with emails, text messages and phone calls at work everyday. Trying to respond to each and every one of them - perhaps out of the anxiety that we may miss something if we don't - often interrupts our train of thought and flow of concentration and that may render us less effective at work. Adapting to the times requires managing ever-expanding amounts of data. We need to learn how to filter out unnecessary information and select and use what is relevant, says Hong Kong-based solicitor Stefania Lucchetti in her book, The Principle of Relevance: The Essential Strategy to Navigate Through the Information Age. Through learning what she calls "the principle of relevance", we can train ourselves to expand our brain's capability to acquire and process multilayered information, and respond only to what is relevant. The first steps to mastering the principle are: developing a clear purpose, establishing criteria to determine when and whether it is attained, and gathering the resources necessary to reach the goal. Then, collect data that relates to the purpose from various points of view, and analyse and comprehend them. The final step is making a decision on if, how and when to respond to the information. Take replying emails as an example. "Whenever you feel like responding immediately to an email, go back to the purpose you have set," Lucchetti writes. "[Is] the content of this email relevant to effectively reaching your ultimate goal? Does it add content that is of real value, or do you feel the need to answer it merely to show your intent to communicate? What are you taking attention away from if you decide to answer the email?" You may then develop a reasonable time interval for checking email. But, ultimately, you have to be the "master of your own mind" to achieve your goal. "Breaking habits requires significant effort, but it can be done. It requires discipline, vision and self-mastery," Lucchetti says. Printed in a larger font size, and with extra spacing between lines and including chapter summaries, the book is designed to make reading easier and thereby help the process of information gathering by readers. The author also provides tools to help readers achieve the principle of relevance, from outcome checklists (on how to set a well-defined goal) and charts (to locate which piece of information is relevant), to pertinent questions and mind maps (in order to make sense of overwhelming information inflows). But the book is not intended to be a guide that offers a quick and easy way out. In fact, it takes time to learn how to use the tools and, as Lucchetti stresses, practice makes perfect. "[If] you... train yourself to use [the tools] habitually and instinctively, you will start processing information more quickly: this will enhance your ability to spot alternatives, expand your options, work with context and find a quicker and better way to reach your intended goal," she writes. --The South China Morning Post, 8 May 2010

From the Back Cover

It's hard to define Stefania's work: it is not simply a book, certainly not a manual, for sure not a guide.  This book is most of all an experience for those who recognize how hard is the job of living in a world where information does not match with knowledge and knowledge does not match with comprehension.

Her way - the principle of relevance - is the key to convert information from a chaotic and shapeless mass into an instrument to empower ourselves, our capabilities and our ambitions, whatever they are, professional or private.

However, Stefania went on and, starting from her own experience, poses a fundamental question to us: in the age of information, where everything is immediately accessible, what are we looking for, really? In a very easy way, she drives us back to our purposes and the true meaning of our searches, pushing ahead a fundamental concept: whatever the focus of our search is on and whatever its purpose is, we must always start from ourselves and not from external data.

Maria Cristina Ferradini, Director, Legal Department, Vodafone Italy

If you often find yourself in information overload,  this Principle, when mastered can change your life. As a logical, linear thinker, I had to laugh at how the author "pegged" my actions and the urgency of my distractions. Stefania provides tools to assist all of us in breaking the habits that keep us from being truly effective.

Judy Irving, Executive Coach, Moving On, USA

I was worried in the first instance that Relevance might prove to be exactly the opposite to me. However by the second page I got the feeling that  this would live up to its name. To discover that it also excelled at offering practical, best practice advice was an absolute blessing.

The idea that everyone can navigate the streams of information that now cascade towards us with unerring accuracy is not realistic. With the aid of the ideas and solutions laid out in easy to follow steps, the readers will hone their "new media" instincts.

A fascinating and educational book.

Nick West, Head of Conferences and Events, Financial Times, Asia Pacific --This text refers to the Kindle Edition edition.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: RT Publishing; 1 edition (April 9, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9889975823
  • ISBN-13: 978-9889975821
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,063,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Alain B. Burrese TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
In "The Principle of Relevance: The Essential Strategy to Navigate Through the Information Age," Stefania Lucchetti tackles the problem of information overload by addressing the questions, "What is worth knowing?" "What is worth doing?" and "What is worth responding to?" It's a quick book to read with large font size and extra spacing between lines, but the answer Lucchetti provides to determine relevance is not as quick. It will take some practice to use Lucchetti's strategy to breeze through information for those items of relevance. And this is something the author acknowledges as she encourages you to use your time on those things determined by you to be relevant.

The author has practiced law for over ten years, and I could sort of see that in the writing. It was a bit more formal than some self-help texts, and was outlined in a very logical and systematical manner. Maybe I saw it because I've been a lawyer almost ten years now. Regardless, I think it helped solidify the message, and it makes it easy to go back and reference parts you want to review.

Again, the book is a quick read, but you'll want to take a little time thinking about what Lucchetti wrote, and how best to incorporate her strategies into your own workflow. After a preface and introduction that provide a short road map of the book, the first part covers the principle of relevance and sums up why relevance is important. The opening quote by Stephen Covey sums it up well, "Anything less than a conscious commitment to the important is an unconscious commitment to the unimportant." The author then briefly goes over five elements of her principle of relevance. These include: 1. clarity of purpose. 2. situational awareness. 3. pattern discernment. 4. attention. 5. self-knowledge and self-mastery.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I liked this book. It had some problems, but I liked the subject matter. And I am not aware of another book that has tried to tackle the subject matter. This book takes a stab at providing a framework for improving the competencies and performances of knowledge workers. You know, the people who do research of all kinds (including on the Internet) and consolidate and condense their findings into white papers, reports, booklets, books, business plans, marketing plans, or whatever else requires research, critical thinking, and time management to create.

Knowledge workers can be amateurs, professionals, or best of all superstars at what they do. They can be incompetent (a novice), competent (merely skilled), or fluent and operating on auto-pilot while making a difference in the world and producing things of value. Some can go to a public library with the intent to research and write a term paper and spend two weeks just trying to find the correct books that are RELEVANT regarding the paper's topic. While other people can go into the library and find all the relevant books, articles, and other sources within 30 minutes and write the paper in the next 30 minutes. We are told in the instant book being reviewed that finding sources on the shelves of a library is one thing (and not all that difficult), but compared to researching online (using the Internet) where the availability of resources to the knowledge worker is unbelievable.

It's one thing to want to be a good knowledge worker who has some grasp of time management skills, research skills, and writing skills. Such a person can be a competent professional.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Stefania Lucchetti has created a must-read for everyone who works.

There is simply too much stuff coming at you. As Stefania sez, it's not enough just to keep up and get through it all -- you need to reeducate yourself to be able to find what's valuable and useful, and ignore all the clutter and crap.

Her three core skills: 1.) Identify what the options are in all that's coming at you 2.) See patterns among the chaos 3. focus your attention and self-knowledge as power ...are critical in today's overloaded work environments.

Get this book so you can "get it" and get on with living and working smarter, not harder.
-- Bill Jensen, Mr Simplicity
Author of Simplicity, What Is Your Life's Work, and Hacking Work (Sept 2010)
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Imho a mishmash of subjects, written in an overintellectualized style. Not applicable in real life. Most subjects are covered much better in other books. Kind of 'me too'. Very wide layout and big character print. Could thus be about 1/3 of the size, making it an expensive read.

Read instead books by Stephen Covey, David Allen, David Schwarz, Michael Gerber, Robert Maurer, James Prochaska, Harv Eker, Leo Babauta, Tim Ferriss, Neil Browne, Neil Fiore, John Hammond etc.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be very helpful. It is filled with real life, practical strategies & skills which will benefit anyone who is looking to maximize their focus & production.

As someone who often gets caught up in the daily activitires of running a business I often get distracted and as a result my effectiveness decreases. The author does a great job at helping the reader see how this lack of focus often leads to less than desireable results. The author does a fantastic job at offering skills & solutions so that the readers can know which actions to focus on and which to avoid.

If you are the type of person who often gets overwhelmed and overloaded due to the numerous possibilities and distractions in your home or work you will find that this book will be a valuable and practical guide to help you know which areas are relevant and require your attention & which must be avoided.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who is looking to get laser focused and increase their level of effectiveness & productivity
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse