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on November 15, 2016
Very good read. Needs to be reread as there is a lot of information. Also it helps to read Victor Frankel book first which I did not do. A big problem with a lot of these books is they have exercises which are hard to follow through when reading on a kindle. If the book is going to be studied which it should then I suggest getting a hard copy (maybe used) and the kindle version to really get the most out of the book.
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on December 31, 2012
Profoundly powerful and practical. Written in straight forward language. The author presents a logical and essential explanation about the fundamental importance of "meaning" in one's life. On a personal level, it has sparked me to reopen the long closed vault which has held my unrequited call to purpose and meaning. Better late than never I guess.

Give yourself a chance to regain meaning and purpose in your life. Listen to your heart while you read this book.
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on October 19, 2014
Prisoners of Our Thoughts is aptly named and Pattakos takes the reader to that understanding by deftly drawing on Viktor Frankl's philosophy and writing on the importance of looking for meaning in life.

Pattakos' main focus is to relate Frankl's philosophy to the modern day workplace, which for many of us is the main moral battleground we experience on a daily basis. My biggest takeaway was the image of a maze in which we are searching for meaning - in contrast to the two other main 20th century philosophies of human motivation: Power and Pleasure.

Pattakos stays very true to his understanding of Frankl's life and work, so in essence this book is a re-reading of Frankl's work within a "modern" context. That came as a surprise to me, but by the end I appreciated his deference to the inspiration for the book.

It would be a good idea to read "Man's Search for Meaning" if you haven't done so already.
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on October 26, 2017
Nicely done. The emphasis on Viktor Frankl is well founded. And the logic and storytellings are helpfully. The affirmation part
might be personnaly helpful. What seems kind of crazy and yesterday thinking in my opinion is the attempt to copyright meaning with the word creation meaningology. So for my taste everything apart from affirmation and copyright is a very good and helpful read.
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on January 10, 2015
Excellent nuts and bolts book on logotherapy. This was exactly what I was looking for after reading Frankl's Man's search. I will keep thus book on my Kindle and work through it time and time again until I no longer am a prisoner of my thoughts.
Enjoy!!!
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on May 4, 2014
Pattakos takes Frankl's work and applies it to the workplace. And the core message of Frankl comes through:we cannot control what happens to us but we can control our reaction to it. He spreads various exercises through the book to help the reader understand the meaning embedded in each and every experience. A short book and well worth the time.
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on April 17, 2011
I don't want to merely repeat what many others have already said in their 5 star reviews of this powerful and important book. Let me keep it short and to the point. This is one of the most meaningful books I have ever read and it sits in an honored place on by shelf next to The Power Of Now (Ekhart Tolle) and The Myth Of Freedom (Chogyam Trungpa).

This is not merely warmed over Victor Frankl. Of course you should read Man's Search for Freedom and other books by the master. But does this take away from this book? Not at all. Prisoners of our Thoughts uses the principles of logotherapy as developed by Dr. Frankel and puts them into a logal progression for the reader to digest and internalize. It's easy to read a book, enjoy it, be moved by it, and then forget it 10 minutes later. This will not happen with this book and it is due to the fact, at least partially, that the material in the book has been taken from a spiritual genius and reformated into a powerful learning experience.

Our entire lives are, in reality, merey quests for meaning. The meaning we attribute to our lives, and hence the very quality of how we live, is up to us and does not depend on our external circumstances. Do yourself and those around you a big favor and make this book your owner's manual for practical successful living.
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on April 8, 2014
In our society, where a broken fingernail can ruin our day, this book puts so much into perspective. Well written, easy to read (and re-read), emotive and heartbreaking and yet, very encouraging.
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on October 27, 2016
A nice build on frankl's work. For those interested in mindfulness and logotherapy. A definite must read.
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on August 2, 2013
Then you'll enjoy this book. I'm a raving fan of Victor Frankle's Man's Search for Meaning. It might be the most powerful secular text I've ever read. Freud proposed maximizing pleasure & minimizing pain. Adler talked about being attracted to power. Frankle believed in the importance of meaning. Alex Pattakos was Frankle's apostle & keeps this torch burning.
4 people found this helpful
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