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The Private Lives of Albert Einstein Paperback – March 15, 1994

4.5 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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A shocking portrait of the greatest genius of this century. So intensely guarded and obscured were the details of Einstein's personal life that it took the authors six months to gain permission to quote from Einstein's correspondence, and even then many letters could only be paraphrased. The book reveals that the Nobel Prize-winner whose genius and work for peace have long been associated with a kind of personal nobility had an adulterous, egomaniacal, and misogynist side with which very few people are familiar.

"A deeply melancholic and moving tale that forces its readers to grapple with the enigma of the Einstein myth."--The Economist --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Highfield, science editor of Britain's Daily Telegraph , and Carter, an editor of the Daily Express , here examine aspects of the life of Albert Einstein (1879-1955) that fall short of his image as a secular saint. They point out that as a youth Einstein sometimes cowered before his mother's will and that he was a mawkish, sentimental and not always loyal teenager. He is faulted for shrinking from some of his children's and his own problems in adulthood and for loving more than one woman. And, if Einstein's failings seem insufficient, the authors also refer to a supposed conspiracy by managers of his literary estate to control the publication of love letters he wrote that have passed into the estate of his son Hans Albert. Highfield and Carter also reiterate the scandal of a second illegitimate daughter whose claim rests on unprovable DNA testing. The material gathered here is not quite new and is in many cases questionable. Photos not seen by PW .
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin (March 15, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312302274
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312302276
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,404,433 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By John Rummel on March 28, 2001
Format: Hardcover
It is inevitable that Albert Einstein's "private lives" will fall under the dissection knives of historians and biographers. There are already dozens of excellent biographies of Einstein on the market, ranging from the extremely scientific to the extremely personal. As the Einstein Papers Project continues to explore the personal correspondence of this remarkable scientist, we can expect the personal revelations to continue. Einstein, as were all great figures of history, was a very complicated person, and a very human one.
In this work, the authors take a very personal look at his life between the high school years and the publication of special relativity. Specifically, it focuses on his first marriage, to Mileva Maric'. Much about this relationship was kept intentionally hidden for years by Einstein's secretary Helen Dukas, and scientist Otto Nathan, who became the de facto protectors of the "Einstein image." Since they had known him in the era of his marriage to his cousin Elsa, they understandably sought to minimize and downplay any factors from his younger years that might reflect negatively upon him, and a failed first marriage, with an illegitimate child, could certainly be seen as less than flattering.
Highfield and Carter's book draws heavily on the work of the Einstein Papers scholars Stachel, Renn, and Schulmann. Einstein's voluminous correspondence from those years has shed much new light on such questions as the fate of the daughter Liseral, but without providing definitive answers. Considerable time is also spent on the issue of Mileva's role in the development of special relativity - topic that exploded with the force of a bomb in recent years.
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Format: Paperback
"Nobody likes to see their sacred cow criticised, but it is about time the real story came out."

- Evelyn Einstein.

This welcome book describes matters that were not generally known before 1993. It makes for grim reading.

Mileva Maric died alone in August 1948. Her death notice carried no mention of her former husband, Albert Einstein. She was buried in Nordheim Cemetery in Zurich.

She endured a sad and lonely life. Her world-famous husband treated her shabbily. He treated her with contempt. He cheated on her and divorced her with cruelty.

Her life was swept under the historical carpet.

Before Mileva and Einstein were married they had their first child. It was a girl, Lieserl. Tragically, they had to give her away. The child develops scarlet fever before she is two years old. Lieserl then joins the ranks of the disappeared.

Mileva's second son developed a mental illness and needed her support. He died in a psychiatric clinic in 1965.
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Format: Paperback
Highfield and Carter (HC) completely demolish the myth created by the Einstein establishment in physics of Saint Einstein.HC demonstrate that Albert Einstein was a misogynist who abandoned/mistreated his children.His basic reason for associating with the opposite sex was to obtain sex.All of Albert's relationships with women were purely sexual .Albert Einstein's interactions with his children and wives were based on deception,duplicity,and deviousness.
HC also show that Albert Einstein was a genius who failed to acknowledge the help and collaboration in his published work.It is absurd for a journal editor to publish a paper,(Einstein's first 1905 paper was on the photoelectric effect;the second paper was on Brownian motion;the third paper was on relativity and had no references;and the last paper established the foundation for the E= m c squared result concerning the relationship between mass and energy) with no references or bibliography.Yet this is exactly what happened .
HC dropped the ball by not explicitly discussing the highly technical discussions that took place in a number of the letters(54) exchanged between Albert and Meliva in the time period between 1897 and 1903.The 47 letters exchanged between 1897 and 1901 contain some highly technical discussions in which Albert asks for help.The smoking gun appears when Albert refers to "our work" and "our theory".These words mean exactly what they say.
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