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3D Programming for Windows®: Three-Dimensional Graphics Programming for the Windows Presentation Foundation (Developer Reference) Paperback – July 31, 2007

4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Key Book Benefits:

-Features in-depth coverage of mesh geometries--the key technology that enables 3D in the Windows Presentation Foundation

-Written by a premier Windows programmer, Charles Petzold

-Includes code examples in XAML and Visual C#

-Supplements the Windows Presentation Foundation essentials covered in Applications = Code + Markup: A Guide to the Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation

About the Author

Charles Petzold has been writing about Windows programming for 25 years. A Windows Pioneer Award winner, Petzold is author of the classic Programming Windows, the widely acclaimed Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software, Programming Windows Phone 7, and more than a dozen other books.

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Product Details

  • Series: Developer Reference
  • Paperback: 450 pages
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press; 1 edition (July 31, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0735623945
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735623941
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #356,951 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Eric Sink on September 18, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent overview of WPF 3D.

Petzold blends his development experience with his math background to explain everything quite thoroughly, from the details of the API to the hows and whys of the math underneath.

* He explains why WPF 3D shades triangles differently depending on whether they share their vertices or not.

* His explanation of quaternions is probably the best I have read.

* He talks about why Viewport3DVisual is better than Viewport3D for printing.

* He explains the math behind lighting calculations.

The book contains lots of pictures, lots of sample code and a library of useful classes for WPF 3D programming.

If you're doing anything with WPF 3D, you simply must have this book.
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Format: Paperback
First, maybe it's worth mentioning that unlike most other books on 3D out there, it concentrates solely on WPF 3D, right from the beginning, and it assumes you have enough knowledge of C# .net/WPF. It doesn't "waste" half of the book trying to teach you C#/Visual Studio/XAML etc... it's a very good attitude. If you need to learn WPF/C#, read another book first. Charles Petzold has a great book on WPF, for example.

And to the book - It teaches most fundamental elements of 3D and how it's done in WPF. Meshes, models, camera, lights, textures, transforms and some basic 3D math are all there. There's also a chapter about quaternions.
Most of the material is well written, and good examples are given throughout the book, just where needed, and all well explained. The examples compile without any problem in Visual Studio 2005/2008 (the Express editions are enough btw).
All the examples are in C#.

Most of the material tends to be pretty practical and useful for real-world application. And that's particularly true to the last chapter, which try to inspire you with real world usage of WPD 3D and examples.

Just note that most of the material isn't very advanced. You'll have to learn more by yourself to write really useful 3D applications. But the book is just what it should be - gives you a very good jump start and leaves the rest for you to explore.

I highly recommend this book for anyone with knowledge of WPF who'd like to jump to the WPF 3D wagon.
Many WPF books dedicate a chapter or 2 about 3D. Even if you read one - this book have much more material and practical info about WPF 3D than those, so I highly recommend in this case as well.
Also, people with knowledge of other more advanced 3D platforms (DirecX/OpenGL) who'd like to know WPF 3D will also find this book useful.
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Format: Paperback
I really want to give this book a 4 or 5 star rating. Petzold goes into amazing detail about almost all aspects of creating 3D images. You really cant go wrong with this book if all you are doing is building static images.

But the books coverage of animation is sadly light. Even though there is a whole chapter on animations, its really light coverage and leaves me wanting for so much more.

And the real problem with this book is, who creates static 3D images? You most likely do 3D AND animation together.

So if you need the guts details on 3D WPF rendering than this book is for you. I you need guts on animation, not so much. And if you need 3D rendering and animation, than you might as well get this book, but know that you'll need to look elsewhere for animation details.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great book for learning 3D from an API that abstracts all the non-3D details.

Whilst XPF 3D has serious performance issues (point collections are immutable, retained mode graphics, lack of support beyond HLSL 1.0 - no vertex or geometry shaders), it is still the easiest, highest level abstraction for 3D development. This book shows you how, and walks you through the concepts and limitations of WPF 3D.

With the WPF team and now the Silverlight team on life support, Does WPF 3D have a future? As far as I am aware, there hasnt been a major change to WPF 3D since .NET 3.51 D3DImage control was introduced. Silverlight / XNA SharedGraphicsDeviceManager seems to now be the recomended approach to integrating 3D in LOB applications, (oops, now SL & XNA are dead too, so use D3DImage in WPF or SurfaceImageSource in Win8 XAML for DirectX interop) but for learning 3D programming in general, this WPF 3D book is great.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mr. Petzold breaks down 3D development into simplest terms fluidly and at a pleasing tempo that will impress. The material presentation addresses generalities (basic considerations) when developing 3D models programmatically providing deep insight into what goes on in the background of a 3D application. The document structure is project based and progressively develops upon previous lessons at a rate that is best described as casual or low stress.

The projects emphasize .Net Framework implementations, but the ideologies and terminologies are industry standard and most all Windows users already have the .Net Framework installed anyway - might as well use it for something. There is an application titled Kazaml that compliments the book and its project format nicely; the application has, among several other things, a code editor and real-time updated view-port that allows you to see your progress in real-time. Kazaml is freeware ($0.00) and works out of the box with the .Net Framework - it has been discontinued, but the last version is still available and works well with the newest .Net Framework version 4.x.

Ol' Charles is an established Windows Developer and writer for Microsoft Press dtaing back some 20 years now. This guy should know his stuff and generally does and anyone looking to break into 3D development or wants to take their modelling to the next level this book is for you - bar none. although this title has aged a bit the data is still pertinent with the newer .Net framework implementations so fear naught.
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