Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants: Plato's Gorgias and the Politics of Shame Kindle Edition

ISBN-13: 978-0691128566
ISBN-10: 0691128561
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Every once in a long while a book comes along that the reader finds so worthwhile, down to the smallest detail, that she painstakingly devours every line and every section, even those with which she finds herself in disagreement, and ultimately closes the book with a sigh of disappointment when the journey is done and the book ends. Such a book is . . . Prudes, Perverts, and Tyrants. . . . This book will be an excellent addition to any philosopher's library, worthy as a graduate level text on ancient philosophy, and valuable for those readers interested in nuanced studies of the effects of the emotions in human societies and in politics. Regardless of whether the reader agrees with the twists and turns of Tarnopolsky's arguments, the journey will be well worth taking."--Wendy C. Hamblet, Philosophy in Review

"Tarnopolsky presents many thought-provoking and helpful interpretations of Plato's Gorgias."--James H. Nichols, Jr., Polis

From the Back Cover

"This is a book of manifold virtues; ambitious and beautifully written, it makes a signal and original contribution to our understanding of Socratic method, the Gorgias, and the politics of shame. Marvelously rich, the book breaks new ground in making shame central to our reading of Plato's dialogues, and equally new ground in the complexity and subtlety of its understanding of shame itself."--Melissa Lane, Princeton University

"Tarnopolsky's interpretation of Plato's Gorgias is original, bold, and convincing. Her cross-disciplinary exploration of shame in its ancient and modern contexts is psychologically, philosophically, and politically deep. This definitive account is required reading for Plato scholars and for anyone interested in contemporary democratic politics."--Jill Frank, University of South Carolina


Product Details

  • File Size: 805 KB
  • Print Length: 222 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0691163421
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (April 12, 2010)
  • Publication Date: April 12, 2010
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003Y8XMLY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,006,710 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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