Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Psychology of Intelligence Analysis 0th Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0160590351
ISBN-10: 1929667000
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
More Buying Choices
7 New from $152.55 17 Used from $81.62 1 Collectible from $199.99
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union by Stephen Budiansky
Code Warriors
Targeting Suspected Spies, Foreign Leaders, and Even American Citizens. A History. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 210 pages
  • Publisher: United States Government Printing (November 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1929667000
  • ISBN-13: 978-0160590351
  • ASIN: 0160590353
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,665,132 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Rafael Etges on May 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
Richards Heuer's Psychology of Intelligence Analysis is based on a compilation of declassified articles from the CIA's Center for the Study of Intelligence, prepared for intelligence analysts and management. However, this book will benefit anyone conducting analyses of complex scenarios in a structured way, including health care professionals, financial and market analysts from all industry verticals, law enforcement and security staff, auditors and fraud investigators, and many others.

Heuer's point is that `analysts should be self-conscious about their reasoning processes. They should think about how they make judgments and reach conclusions, not just about the judgments and conclusions themselves'. The book presents a discussion of how mental models and subconscious cognitive processes can limit our reasoning capabilities (especially when coping with uncertainty and doubt), as well as an introduction on how we can try to understand and negate these effects.

In his analysis, Heuer presents data from internal and external cognitive studies, scrutinizes past CIA success and failure cases, and proposes a re-evaluation of the way we generally look at problems. The author brilliantly makes his point in Chapter 13 by showing scenarios in which the reader is invited to review previous statements and `evidence' from the text, look at the discussion from different angles, methodically apply or remove certain models, and then compare his/her own conclusions as a professional analyst would be expected to do.

The outcomes are disturbing, but not surprising. Disturbing because it is alarming to see how our judgments are normally biased by previous experiences, pre-conceptions and mental models; also because it is extremely hard to change or even notice this fact by ourselves.
Read more ›
Comment 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Richard Heuer knows his stuff. A former director at The Agency, Heuer has the domain expertise to write intelligently about the practice of intelligence analysis. Combine this with his considerable research into the field of psychology, and his clear, succinct style, and you have an excellent source book for anyone interested in how analysts analyze: the good, the bad, and the ugly. Highly recommended.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on September 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
Given recent events (WTC) this is a book that is a must read.
The author very succinctly and methodically explains how as intelligence/information is gathered, a natural and possibly unavoidable human response may prevent an analyst from seeing objectively what is occurring.
The author give examples of how an analyst will automatically start to correlate data into a primary analysis despite trying not to. As the author explains there is a strong tendancy to disregard information that is contrary to the analysts' primary analysis and over estimate the importance of data that correlates with the analysts' primary analysis. Thus the final analysis may be based upon a flawed primary analysis which is in turn based on incomplete data, colored any analytical prejudices the analyst may have.
An absolute must read for any police or law enforcement officers.
As well as anybody who must analyze data from engineers doing failure analysis to doctors doing disgnosis.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
These texts were written in 1978-86, and updated in 1999. Do not expect to find anything of the latests research here.
My main concern is that the examples are not really about intelligence,
they are general psychology, with very few examples directly relevant to intelligence.
There are not revelations about secret war here, not even of old incidencies: the book was carefully screened by CIA before it was declassified.

More modern books (and in freestyle, not in textbook format) with the same contents include:

Massimi Piatelli-Palmarini: Inevitable illusions: How our mistakes of reason rule our minds (1994)

Inevitable Illusions: How Mistakes of Reason Rule Our Minds

Carol Tavris & Elliot Aronson: Mistakes were made (but not by me): Why we justify foolish beliefs, bad decisions and hurtful acts (2007)

Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
One reviewer has the following criticism: "The book is less than successful primarily because Heuer appears to believe that mere technique or `tradecraft' can be codified and used to produce good analysis." Whether or not Heuer actually believes this or not, I do not know, however, I disagree with this criticism as it pertains to this book. I have never worked in a formal intelligence environment or as an intelligence analyst, so I am only addressing what I perceived as the intention, stated or not, of this book.

I believe it is clear that he is addressing this book (or series of articles) to those who are already trained intelligence analysts in some capacity, and is discussing the importance of, and giving some instruction on how, to avoid the pitfalls and hindrances associated with our human cognitive processes. From my perspective, he is not trying to teach a particular one-size-fits-all analysis technique, or trying to imply that anyone can perform and excel as an analyst just by following a prescribed procedure.

Actually, I believe he addresses some very deep and sophisticated topics in a very practical manner. His writing is very plain and easy to understand, as are the examples and studies he cites to make his point. He does not attempt to write like a scientist, he keeps the subject matter on a level that makes it easy to understand, which in turn, makes it more useful to you. (You cannot apply what you do not understand.) In fact, as I read this book I could immediately recall situations in my life where I paid a price for making some of the mistakes he outlines and see that I could have brought about much better conclusions and solutions if I had the knowledge in this book.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews