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Pueblo Nations: Eight Centuries of Pueblo Indian History Paperback – April 15, 1992

4.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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From Library Journal

Written by a Native American author from the Jemez Pueblo near Santa Fe, this updates his Pueblo Indians (Indian Historical Pr., 1976), and complements his Nee Hemish: A History of Jemez Pueblo (Univ. of New Mexico Pr., 1982). Discussed are origins and development of Pueblo civilization, Spanish conquest, the Pueblo Revolt of the 1680s, land, water, survival, and U.S. government influence. Text, maps, and bibliography are close to Pueblo Indians; new additions include recent events, discussion of the "Colubmian Quincentenary and the Pueblo Indians," and additional photographs. Students of modern Pueblo history may wish to read Pueblo Nations in tandem with R.C. Gordon-McCutchan's The Taos Indians and the Battle for Blue Lake (Red Crane Bks., 1991). Author-educator Sando's work may help Pueblos understand their history from a Native American perspective and will illuminate Pueblo struggles and heritage for other readers. This is recommended for Native American and general collections that lack the earlier book or need an update of it.
-Margaret W. Norton, Fenwick H.S., Oak Park, Ill.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

. . . the first insider's story of the 800-year history of the 19 Pueblos in New Mexico. This is an excellent book. --New York Times

Written by a Native American author from the Jemez Pueblo near Santa Fe, this updates his Pueblo Indians (Indian Historical Pr., 1976), and complements his Nee Hemish: A History of Jemez Pueblo (Univ. of New Mexico Pr., 1982). Discussed are origins and development of Pueblo civilization, Spanish conquest, the Pueblo Revolt of the 1680s, land, water, survival, and U.S. government influence. Text, maps, and bibliography are close to Pueblo Indians; new additions include recent events, discussion of the Columbian Quincentenary and the Pueblo Indians and additional photographs. Students of modern Pueblo history may wish to read Pueblo Nations in tandem with R.C. Gordon-McCutchan's The Taos Indians and the Battle for Blue Lake (Red Crane Bks., 1991). Author-educator Sando's work may help Pueblos understand their history from a Native American perspective and will illuminate Pueblo struggles and heritage for other readers. This is recommended for Native American and general collections that lack the earlier book or need an update of it.
-Margaret W. Norton, Fenwick H.S., Oak Park, Ill.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --Library Journal
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Clear Light Pub; New Ed edition (April 15, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0940666073
  • ISBN-13: 978-0940666078
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #866,395 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Michael Reding on February 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
As a member of the Sun Clan of the Jemez people, Joe Sando was in a unique position to research and write this history. As a scholar trained at Eastern New Mexico State and at Vanderbilt, he developed his skills as an historian. As a person he retained his empathy and humanity while confronting the unjust policies that have been visited on the Pueblo peoples by the Spanish, Mexican and United States governments. If you are interested in a well-balanced, incisive history of the New Mexico Pueblo people (the Hopi are not covered here), this book is worth the money to buy, the effort to read and the time to understand.
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Format: Paperback
Sando, born in Jemez Pueblo, gives us a unique view of pueblo life. Not only was he born in a pueblo, but he also spent the rest of his life teaching history and making history as an insider visiting and inquiring in all of the nineteen New Mexico pueblos. He was familiar with the written history of his 'nation' and most importantly the biases of these outsiders while slowly accumulating the viewpoints of the nineteen different 'states' within his 'nation'.

He recognizes the diversity of the pueblos by pointing out their diversity of language: seven speak Tiwa, six Tewa, his native Jemez Towa (the fourteen constitute a language family similar to Romance languages, related but not mutually understood). Seven other pueblos speak Keresan (with accent differences). Zuni is a separate language unto itself.

Sando realizes that the nineteen likely had fewer differences in their prehistoric past, but when they relocated in the Southwest, particulary in the Rio Grande Valley, differences grew until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s. The Spanish considered them conquered and demanded land and labor from the pueblos. The Indians did manage to keep much of their land, but labored long and hard for the Spanish. When the foreigners demanded the pueblos become Christian, their native religions went underground, with superficial adherence to Christianity. Sando retains the pueblo secrecy of their religion, and we learn little about it from him. But he gives us good reason as to how Spanish persecution brought puebo Indians closer together.
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Format: Paperback
At 282 pages (hardback version), Joe Sando presented a unique prespective on the history of the Pueblo Indians, a confederation of tribes that stretch from the Zuni Pueblo on the New Mexico-Arizona state line to Taos Pueblo in North Central New Mexico. There is some remarks in this book that the Hopis are part of this confederation as well.

The book covers the history of the people from before the entrance of the Spaniards to the time of the book's publication in 1992. The Pueblo Revolt gets proper coverage with the interesting statement that the reputed leader of the revolt, Po-Pay, was little more than a associate of the campaign as most of the names of the leaders are lost to history. The oppresion and the foolish forced conversions to Christianity from the Spaniards as well as rival tribes such as the Apaches and the Navajos are explained from a viewpoint that the Pueblos just wanted to left alone and to pursue their agricultural way of life.

Other subjects covered include the adjustment of the Pueblo peoples to modern society and their education, difficulties with the United States that resulted in the taking of their lands and the their governmental structure which dates back to Spanish occupation. There is also an in-depth section that details nine Pueblo people that have shaped their history including Pablo Abeita, Sotero Ortiz, Mateo Aragon and Martin Vigil.

The book is richly illustrated with an extensive timeline of Pueblo history, a copy of the All Indian Pueblo Council Constitution, feast days of each Pueblo and some statistics. A nice bibliography, but no index. If one has to read a short, yet concise book on these people, I would recommend this one wholeheartly.
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