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Python Algorithms: Mastering Basic Algorithms in the Python Language (Expert's Voice in Open Source) 2010th Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1430232377
ISBN-10: 1430232374
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Magnus Lie Hetland is an experienced Python programmer, having used the language since the late 1990s. He is also an associate professor of algorithms at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, having taught algorithms for the better part of a decade. Hetland is the author of Practical Python and Beginning Python, first and second editions, as well as several scientific papers.
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Product Details

  • Series: Expert's Voice in Open Source
  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 2010 edition (November 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1430232374
  • ISBN-13: 978-1430232377
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.8 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #440,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Hancock on December 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pros:
- Very clear explanation of a complex subject.
- Each chapter builds upon the previous chapters so that this is more like a class than a reference manual.
- More approachable that the Sedgewick and Cormen.

Cons:
- The almost constant parenthetical phrases distract from the text and quickly become irritating. After page 20 I just skipped them and found that I understood the concepts more quickly.
- The use of single letter variables in the code examples makes it more difficult to understand the structure of a new concept. When there are several of them, it can become confusing. (See page 207.) Why not just use descriptive variable names?

There are sections that make note of how to implement certain algorithms using Python specific features, and this is very helpful, but this is first and foremost a book on algorithmic theory that happens to use Python for code examples.
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Format: Paperback
While this author presents very interesting topics, following along with coding is particularly difficult. His coding style is very difficult to follow.

His habit of using single character variables (lower and upper case) obfuscates all of his code. This incredibly poor naming convention makes me wonder where this author learned to code.

He writes a function and does not provide accompanying data to create a test of the function. A developer is left to wonder how this function will work in the real world.

While the accompanying source code does contain tests, they are just as difficult to read as the book version. These tests contain few pertinent comments and one is left wondering why any one test exists. The test are certainly not unit tests since they don't apparently cover corner cases. No industrial strength QA would pass this code. And certainly no code review would allow this code into their code base.

This leaves a reader struggling to follow coding examples since he must create his own data to explore the various algorithms.

I'll allow a 4 for material and a 0 for user accessibility. The overall rating is thus a 2.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Someone else appropriately posted that this book is way too verbose for its intended purpose and I whole heartedly agree.
The author berates points in this book that could be explained succinctly, I recently found a web site by a Greek comp-sci undergrad who explains in very plain english how to understand the theoretical computer that every algorithmist uses as a base line.
The author of the web page also explained very simply how to understand Theta, Omega, Big/Little O, tightly bound and loosely bound and so on.

There is a prevalent myth floating around in the world that certain mathematical formulas, scientific concepts and statistical theories are just too esoteric and abstract to explain in real plain english. From reading Magnus book I would say that he is one of those people who chooses to continue to perpetuate that myth.

I would post the link to the website but Amazon deletes web links. But search for a 'gentle introduction to algorithm complexity' and you should find it. The author of that website has a talent to explain technical concepts succinctly and understandbely, you only have to bring some programing background and motivation to understand it.

By contrast in order to read and comprehend this book you have to bring an exposure to and a fetish for theory, indeed a fetish.
I cant imagine what practical Python programmer or any programmer this book is geared for.
I dare say that even for an advanced comp-sci majors this book will become boring very quickly either because it covers everything you *should* already know or you just want to get down to programming.

Where the author could have used plain english and expanded on practical technical concepts the author instead chose to indulge in abstracting theory.
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Format: Paperback
I found Python Algorithms not only extremely helpful but an enjoyable read as well, not an easy task for an algorithm book. The text is conversational and well-organized, with numerous side notes that allow the reader to make insightful connections. The author's use of humor is not overwhelming, nor is it so sparse as to confuse novice readers to his intent. His use of sidebars can bog down the topics at times, but this has the advantage of making this text appropriate for readers of all skill levels.

The author also takes great pains to explain Python code within the book, which not only models well-written code to the reader but also takes advantage of eliminating pseudo-code with concrete examples of the Python language. The use of citations and notes on external sources within the book made it possible for me to independently research topics on the web. For more hands-on learners, there are exercises at the end of each chapter. This text could easily be the basis for a college-level class on Python and algorithm theory/development. All in all, a great text and a must-have for the Python programmer!
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Format: Paperback
This book presents a quite broad range of fundamental computer science
algorithms, with all illustrative code written in Python. There is a
strong emphasis on graph algorithms, perhaps reflecting a predilection
of the author. Since I like graphs too I cannot complain about that.

Beyond the actual implementations, the book aims for extra Python
relevance by including asides on Python internals (CPython, to be
precise). I was pleasantly surprised by the ones included, as they go
beyond the trivial. Given the prevalence of graph algorithms heaps (or
priority queues) had to play a central role, and the aside on Python's
heapq module is perhaps the most important of them. I wish there were
more of the Pythonic asides, though.

Even so, the book makes clear how Python's carefully balanced design
enables beautiful, concise implementations. There is almost no low
level busy-work code, the algorithms practically read themselves. And
they are commented too just in case you find a piece difficult to
understand.

There's more to algorithms then the implementations, though: one has to
address correctness proofs and efficiency properties. The book
certainly doesn't neglect these, but if there's one clear downside (for
this reader) it is this: too much English, too few symbols. The author
goes to great lengths to use informal language instead of "math" when
discussing correctness and efficiency, and in the end I think he
overdoes it. Here's an example from Chapter 7, on greedy algorithms,
discussing the scheduling problem with hard deadlines, discrete time
and tasks of equal length:

"The last question then becomes, does S' have the same profit as S?
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