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The Quest for Citizenship: African American and Native American Education in Kansas, 1880-1935 Hardcover – September 13, 2010

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Warren's well-researched and valuable study is intriguing.--American Historical Review



Students of the history of education will benefit from this helpful investigation that allows comparison to contemporary schools like the Hampton Institute and Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute. Recommended.--Choice



A valuable contribution to Kansas history and essential reading for those interested in education and the construction of identities among two of America's most prominent minority groups." --The Journal of American History



A bold and important work that situates the Kansas story in the larger context of race relations in America . . . . This very fine book deserves a careful reading by educational historians. Students, moreover, will find it a fascinating window on the complex connections between race, education, and the meaning of citizenship in America.--History of Education Quarterly



A good, well-documented contribution to our understanding of the driving forces behind education for African Americans and Native Americans and the end results of such schooling.--Kansas History



A thoughtful examination of the educational, philosophical, and developmental history of nonwhite peoples in the United States, highly recommended as a worthy addition to college and public library American History shelves.--Midwest Review of Books

Review

With clarity, insight, and understanding, Kim Cary Warren vividly brings to life the heroic educational struggles of African Americans and Native peoples as they embraced alternative conceptions of citizenship during a transformative period of American history.--William J. Reese, author of America's Public Schools: From the Common School to "No Child Left Behind"



In this engrossing comparative study, Kim Warren explores the education of African American and Native American students in Kansas in order to make larger claims about the meanings and expectations of U.S. citizenship. The work she has done to unearth fresh materials, as well as to smartly reexamine well-known figures in the histories of black and Indian schooling, shines through in this illuminating book.--Tiya Miles, author of Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom



Drawing on thorough research, Warren uses overlooked stories of Kansas schools for African Americans and American Indians to explore broader patterns of racism and identity construction. In doing so she addresses a neglected area--the comparison of African American and American Indian experiences in an age commonly called 'Jim Crow' for the former and 'assimilation' for the latter.--Wilbert H. Ahern, Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of History and American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota, Morris

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (September 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807833967
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807833964
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,284,377 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

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Kim Warren, history professor at the University of Kansas, has done a masterful job of comparing the educational experiences of Native Americans and African Americans in the state of Kansas before World War II. Although those experiences are told through the voices of a number of individuals, This study successfully sets those experiences in the context of what was going on in the nation as a whole.
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Format: Paperback
University of Kansas assistant professor of history Kim Cary Warren presents The Quest for Citizenship: African American and Native American Education in Kansas, 1880-1935, a close study of the educational experience for African Americans and Native Americans in Kansas during the close of the nineteenth and the first third of the twentieth centuries. Kansas has been chosen as a particular focus point partly because it was home to a significant population of Native Americans and former slaves, and partly because it was mired in the middle of the conflict over slavery prior to and during the Civil War. After the Civil War, white reformers created segregated schools that ultimately supported the status quo. The Quest for Citizenship reveals strategies developed by African Americans that encouraged inclusion and integration, while Native Americans adopted tactics that promoted autonomy and bicultural identity. Warren presents a convincing thesis that these efforts formed the parent ideology the civil rights and Indian rights movements. Also available in a hardcover edition, The Quest for Citizenship is a thoughtful examination of the educational, philosophical, and developmental history of nonwhite peoples in the United States, highly recommended as a worthy addition to college and public library American History shelves.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Easy to read. Very interesting
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