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Rabbit Hill Paperback – October 27, 1977

4.3 out of 5 stars 87 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert Lawson (1892-1957) received his art training at the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts. His favorite medium, pen and ink, is used expressively and with detail in his black and white illustrations in The Story of Ferdinand (by Munro Leaf). In addition to illustrating many children's books, including Mr. Popper's Penguins, Robert Lawson also wrote and illustrated a number of his own books for children. In 1940, he was awarded the Caldecott Medal for his picture book illustrations in They Were Strong and Good and in 1944, he was awarded the Newbery Medal for his middle grade novel Rabbit Hill.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 1050L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin Books; 1 edition (1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014031010X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140310108
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.4 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #971,069 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Chrijeff VINE VOICE on October 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
On a hill in the peaceful Connecticut countryside stands an old foursquare house, in which for many years there lived a family of good Folks. They respected the Small Animals that shared their Hill, their children played hide-and-seek with them on warm evenings and their old lady Spaniel even raised an orphaned fox cub. Then they moved away, and hard times fell upon the Hill. The Small Animals, forced to do their "marketing" in Fat-Man-at-the-Crossroads' garden, have wondered for a long time whether they would ever get such Folks again. Now, at last, New Folks are coming, and the question in every Animal's mind is, what kind of Folks will they be?

"Rabbit Hill" is perhaps Lawson's best-known book, though he wrote many that deserve to be returned to print. Based upon the actual hill on which he lived, it follows the adventures of the Rabbit family, Father (a Southern gentleman from the Kentucky Bluegrass who talks like a dictionary), Mother (a chronic worrier), Little Georgie, and the permanently-visiting Uncle Analdas, and their many animal neighbors--Willie Fieldmouse and his vast family, the forgetful Gray Squirrel, Foxy, Phewie the Skunk, old Porky the Groundhog, the Red Deer and his Doe and Fawn, Mole for whom Willie must often "be eyes," and more. His Animals are drawn lovingly and accurately both in words and pictures (he did his own illustrations) and behave recognizably as we might expect them to do if they were intelligent enough to speak to one another. And there's a surprising amount of excitement for such a short book: Georgie's flight from a pursuing dog and his remarkable leap across Dead Man's Brook, the question of whether the Folks will be Good Folks or not, and the aftermath of Georgie's mishap with a car on the Black Road. The close of the tale is heart-warming and beautiful. This is a kids' book to which I return over and over.
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Format: Hardcover
I bought this book to accompany the purchase of a rabbit for my son. We used this book for our family's read aloud time. We are already fans of Mr. lawson so it was with high hopes that we began this wonderful book. It is about animals and the hardships creatures encounter as a result of man's carelessness and selfihness. We rarely think about the impact our daily existence has on nature, especially the one that makes up our backyards. When kindly people move into the house on Rabbit Hill, the pooor existence of the animals takes a definite turn for the better. The humans are kind and are able to co-exist with all the different kinds of animals on their property. This book is fun but it an allegory for modern times as well. it ends with the placing of the statue of St. Francis of Assissi in the garden; a powerful reminder that we are stewards of God's creation.
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Format: Paperback
Man, this is one awesome book! And if you think I just like it because I'm a kid, you are wrong! This book is great for all ages including the teen age. Rabbit Hill is about a colony of wild animals who live on Rabbit Hill. Next to Rabbit Hill is a house called the Big House with a patch of land for crops. Every year or so, New Folks come to live in the House. The last Folks were bad folks who didn't care for the bustling nature around them and didn't take care of the land. Now that New Folks are coming, everybody is afraid and excited, and soon all kinds of incidents and adventures happen. I'm not going to give away the surprise, but you should read this book. At some parts the talking is a bit like a formal, business style, which makes some parts just a bit confusing. But you'll anyway love it. All kinds of people will love the animals including Phewie the skunk, Willie the field mouse, Little Georgie the rabbit, and more. Like I said, it's not just for little kids, but for all ages.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a refreshing return to the innocent 40's of children's literature, when Animals talk and behave just like people. The Hill (somewhere in CT) is abuzz with excitement and anticipation when rumors race through field and burrow that--finally--new Folks are coming! There will be owners in residence at the old, neglected farmhouse. Times have indeed been hard for the little animals, who are reduced to a meagre existence and near starvation during bitter winters--merely scavenging off the land in its natural state. High Time there were real Folks in the house once more, planting and canning! Yet there are potential dangers from the unknown newcomers as well: dogs, cats, Boys, poisons, traps, fences, etc. Most people are determined to protect their produce and flowers from the very creatures who cherish their rights to help themselves.
Robert Lawson presents young readers with a wide cast of characters, ranging in size from mice to a buck. All the animals speak and understand English, which helps in communciation between species, but pales before the astonishing actions of the new Folks, who have to prove either their value or their threat to the Hill society. Communal democracy is practiced at the annual ritual called Dividing Night, when each family is allotted a certain portion of the vegetable garden for their private use. If and When the new Folks actuallly plow, plant and tend it properly.
Father Rabbit is a Southern gentleman who speaks in elegant terms while boring everyone with his tales of the Blue Grass country. Mother Rabbit proves a stereotypical 40's mom, and Uncle Analdas is the irrascible, grumbling, hot-tempered grouchy relative.
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