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The Race Card: White Guilt, Black Resentment, and the Assault on Truth and Justice Hardcover – April 2, 1997

4.8 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Essays edited by Collier and Horowitz explore how black separatists and others are attacking King's dream of a color-blind society. 'Afrocentrism' is fueling a separatist movement fed on hatred of others: that's the major theme which evolves from this collection, written by academics who analyze the situation. -- Midwest Book Review

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This collection of provocative essays, edited by bestselling authors Peter Collier and David Horowitz, explores how Martin Luther King's dream of a color-blind society is being undermined by black separatists and others who profit from the cynical exploitation of racial pride. The writers expose the underside of this new Afrocentrism—the crackpot theories, the bullying of dissent, the naked appeals to violence. Three themes emerge:

• Political trials—how the notorious cases of O.J. Simpson, Philadelphia's convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal, and others have muddied our sense of truth, justice, and reason
• Afro-fascism—how some influential black leaders such as Louis Farrakhan have fueled a separatist movement that seems to feed on the hatred of Jews, Koreans, and whites
• The new racism—how racial pride, taken to its destructive extreme on the streets and in the schools of America, is leading to a society of bitter divisions.

Academic partisans have rewritten the textbooks to enshrine Afrocentric orthodoxy inside Ivy League walls; politically correct media reports have ignored the troubling implications. The Race Card is a cogent, compelling, and long-needed call for a return to reason.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Prima Lifestyles; First Printing edition (April 2, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761509429
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761509424
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,636,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
On December 29, 1992 one of the most brutal racially motivated killings since the era of lynching occurred in South Carolina. The victim was Melissa McLauchlin, a young woman who was kidnapped, raped, violently tortured and then dumped on a highway in an effort to avenge "400 years of oppression".
I heard about the crime quite by accident while passing through the area at just the right time. For years I thought that no one else would remember this woman's death as it was blatantly ignored by the national media. It was quite a surprise to open this book and find an entire chapter largely devoted to the circumstances surrounding the killing.
This alone would justify reading the book, which also focuses on other "politically incorrect" subject matter relating to race. The editors do a commendable job of presenting challenges to the moral character and direction of the modern civil rights movement while disallowing racist implications and language.
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By A Customer on December 28, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the most disturbing books I've read in a long time.
Some of the essays are chilling, and all are informative, well-written and compelling. There is little here in which one can take comfort.
A must-read for whites and open-minded blacks as well.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was born in 1969 but didn't really realize the power of the Radical 60's movement. What a disastrous Generation! Just look at our current political climate now, 60's Radical/Communist Generation running the Government and our Government Schools!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Length: 8:25 Mins
Hi Bernard Chapin reviewing another great book. Why do I cherish so many that I review? Selection bias...as I wouldn't spend the cash if I didn't think I'd love them.
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