Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

A Race on the Edge of Time: Radar--The Decisive Weapon of World War II Reprint Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1557781390
ISBN-10: 1557781397
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
More Buying Choices
8 New from $39.99 23 Used from $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 371 pages
  • Publisher: Athena; Reprint edition (November 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557781397
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557781390
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,361,679 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Fisher conbines political history (WW1 and WW2), personal biography (Watson Watt, Churchill, Goëring), science (cathode tubes), and a little mathematics, to produce a readable and enjoyable story. Contents divided into nineteen chapters in five parts -

Part One - The Death Ray
Part Two - Toil and Trouble
Part Three - The Battle
Part Four - The Blitz and the Boot
Part Five - The Band Plays On

Fisher starts with WW1 and how England reacted opposite to Germany. Germany, elected Hitler to rebuild the military and destroy the treaty. England voted to dismantle military and build houses. Churchill, and his consistent warning of Hitler's ambition, was rejected. This political background is skillfully threaded throughout the book. When war arrived, Churchill plays a bigger role in this story.

Fisher covers the scientific history of radar, that is - electro-magnetic waves - from failed efforts to unknown successes. Very interesting! Spends a few pages explaining "wave-particle duality". Well done.

Nevertheless, human emotion, pride, stubbornness, determination, courage, endurance, etc., dominates this story. "The British were aware at the time that though German radar was every bit as technically sophisticated as their own, it was not appreciated by the German military, was not integrated into their war scheme, and so was virtually useless." (268) Fisher notes this happened a Pearl Harbor, where radar protected the ships, but the soliders ignored it. Facinating!

Detailed description of the Battle of Britain. Explains how close the German's came to winning and why they didn't. In fact, relates Goëring's day to day decisions in conducting the battle. Revealing and insightful!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author gets top marks for his explanations of scientific topics. I have read many explanations of why an airplane can fly and thought I understood the phenomenon, but Fisher's explanation is the only one I have ever read that explains, in understandable terms what constitutes air pressure. A light bulb went off in my head. If Dr. fisher were teaching an online physics course I would sign up immediately. But if he were teaching a course on World War 2 or the battle of Brittain, or even the history of science 1939-1945 I would look elsewhere. In fisher's view, German science is ignored completely. Germans (or "Huns" as Fisher likes to call them) are just a bunch of comic book villains led by Hitler and Goering, the latter apparently being more despicable because of his obesity: pg 218. "...he (Goering) began to feel an irresistible swell of angry desperation creeping up under his bulging belly." If you enjoy this sort of writing then read this book. Otherwise, don't.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have to disagree with many of the comments here. I picked this book up at a Time Share where we were vacationing.....forgot my book. Actually, my wife thought I might find it interesting. Didn't sound like something I would like to read.....I mean Radar?. But I love history. I was very pleasantly surprised. Fisher does a very good job with the technical information. To be honest, I did skip through a number of pages loaded with diagrams and science that would have spoiled my day on the beach in Mexico. But it was a fascinating book. Like so many factual books, it is often a sad reminder how luck, or bad weather, or just happenstance play a much greater role in the outcome of great events, then the "greatness" of the generals calling the shots.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book, points out the importance of Information Operations in War. There were a number of significant technologies developed during the war, the atomic bomb, the proximity fuze, the jet engine and the use of electronic encryption, and decryption, however I believe RADAR, and its deployment represent the single greatest advancement.

The book does not talk much about the technology, but to be fair it is a history book. Its fairly exhaustive discussion about the Battle of Britian is appropriate. The Battle of Britian, along with the Battle of Midway, represent two key turning points in the war. It did discuss the quick advancement of the technology when the British gave the key component of lightweight radar systems, the Magnetron to the US. With the deployment of these systems in Aircraft, it allowed the allies to "own the night" in the air.

I thought it was an easy read. It did not really have any "slow" parts. I would recommend it to anyone who is a student of WWII, who wants to better understand the technology of the war, and its impact on the outcome.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse