Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.05
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Best-Book-Depot
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used book at great price. Maybe Ex-lib, may have wear or marking, may not contain supplement such as CD. Prompt shipping and great customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness Hardcover

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
$14.73 $3.03
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John L. Jackson, Jr., teaches at the Annenberg School for Communication and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Harlemworld: Doing Race and Class in Contemporary Black America and Real Black: Adventures in Racial Sincerity. His writing has appeared in numerous academic and popular publications, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, South Atlantic Quarterly, and the American Journal of Sociology. He lives in Philadelphia.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Calls for a conversation about race crop up persistently—as in the wake of the Imus scandal or O.J. Simpson's acquittal. Jackson's (Harlemworld; Real Black) examination of how race remains singular in American consciousness proves a lively opening gambit to a thought-provoking analysis. After a loose historical survey of race matters before the 1960s, when brash and brazen American racism was mainstream, Jackson focuses on the current state of affairs in racial fears and distrust that have gone underground and express themselves as racial paranoia and de cardio racism (what the law can't touch, what won't be easily proved or disproved, what can't be simply criminalized or deemed unconstitutional). Racial paranoia, not just 'a black thing,' owes much to the way mass media confirms or subverts stereotypes; de cardio racism is cloaked, papered over with public niceties and politically correct jargon. Jackson explores particularly fresh areas in his illuminating consideration of The Man Who Cried I Am and 1996, racial paranoia's canonical texts and in his attention to the McCarran Act's effect upon black thinkers. Passionate and committed Jackson is, but his content is balanced. Casually scholarly and often witty, Jackson offers the reader new ways of talking about race's subtler dynamic and new ways of spying racial conflict in the twenty-first century. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Basic Civitas Books
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008SLR7C2
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 1 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,876,324 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Linda Erlich on August 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
i became aware of this book while taking a course in Multicultural Counseling. As a licensed psychologist and doctoral candidate I am fascinated by this topic. I wanted to learn more about how people understand and misunderstand each other. This book explains the complex issue of how well meaning people, attempting to make others comfortable by using language that is sensitive and non-offensive have inadvertently created a situation where racism is hidden by language.

At one time, racism was out in the open, and those who were hateful of those who were different used language to express their feelings. Now, using political correctness, they hide their racism. According to Jackson, racism is now expressed in more subtle ways and this has created a sense of paranoia in those who are discriminated against. Simple gestures are subject to misinterpretation as possible racism. Therefore the cries of racism have increased. Paranoia has developed.

This is an interesting read for any person who is interested in the state of human relationships in our society today. i highly recommend it.
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Jackson offers tremendous insight into how race operates in the post-civil rights era. His discussions of Dave Chappelle, de cardio racism, and hip hop are flat-out brilliant. Through these chapters, Jackson shows how race and racism operate has changed and gone "underground" into people's hearts. This change means that racial motivations are no longer clearly stated, causing folks to become "paranoid" in their efforts to find the hidden racial meaning of everyday encounters. He also does an excellent job explaining why racial insults (like Don Imus, Michael Richards, etc.) seem so significant because they appear to reveal the "real thoughts" in a person's heart. It really helps further the conversation about race in contemporary America.

Despite the excellent analysis, the chapters do not flow together and a few of them, like the section on Tijuana Brawley, feel like fluff. I would encourage people to read the book, but you might want to skim some of it.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Kirkus Review described this book as "a professor’s lecture notes run amok." I would have to say, I agree. There were definitely some good tidbits of ideas and information here, but the author's overall thesis feels underdeveloped. It felt like reading 215 pages of wandering thoughts with few examples and almost no data to support those thoughts and no strong conclusions drawn in the end. Nothing really ties together. Even the last chapter titled "Conclusion" doesn't offer anything very concrete. I found myself wondering why this book was even published.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Few books offer as concise and cogent a review of the history of the African American in America as does John L. Jackson, Jr.'s RACIAL PARANOIA: THE UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF POLITICAL CORRECTNESS. The Introduction to this elegantly written book mixes historical references to slavery and the variations of that horrific time in our history with subsequent alterations in the civil rights gains and losses, and leads into discussions of contemporary figures who influence the manner in which racism persists under different guises today. Jackson is both scholarly in his research and presentation while always maintaining a keen sensitivity to the reader's attention by including such well-known public figures as OJ Simpson, David Chappelle, Oprah Winfrey, President Bush, Eddie Murphy and other prominent political and entertainment figures. In that Introduction he outlines his own position by comparing Louis Farrakhan and Kayne West: "Farrakhan and West epitomize 'hard' and 'soft' versions of what I'm calling racial paranoia: distrustful conjecture about purposeful race-based maliciousness and the 'benign neglect' of racial indifference.'' It is this 'progression' from blatant racism to the Politically Correct 'enlightened' racism that makes this book so valuable a read: the mirror is well polished to reflect a bit of each of our faces.

Where Jackson succeeds in maintaining the extended study of the occult physical and cautiously spoken types of racism is his ability to build a solid platform of fact to post his suggestions of persistent behavior. Never lecturing to the reader, Jackson introduces a degree of humor that makes the contemporary trend toward total acceptance of color lines as entertaining as well as pungent.
Read more ›
79 Comments 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse