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Rage for Order Original recording remastered, Extra tracks, Special Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 136 customer reviews

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Queensryche came close to cracking the Top 40 with this 1986 LP, continuing on their classic-metal path with London; The Killing Words; Surgical Strike , and more. Bonus tracks: Walk in the Shadows (live); I Dream in Infrared ('91 acoustic remix), and two live cuts!
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 6, 2003)
  • Rmst ed. edition
  • Original Release Date: 1986
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Extra tracks, Special Edition
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B0000931Q7
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (136 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,586 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Format: Audio CD
1986 was a phenomenal year for metal. If you could ignore Judas Priest's "Turbo," you might recall that Ozzy topped the charts with "The Ultimate Sin." Iron Maiden released "Somewhere in Time," their most musically complex collection. Megadeth gained respect with "Peace Sells" while Metallica peaked with "Master of Puppets." Anthrax unleashed its classic "Among the Living," Slayer pushed (rather tore) the envelope with "Reign in Blood," and Queensryche, that five-piece band out of the future spawning grounds of grunge, soared past its Priest/Maiden roots with the raw, hard but colorfully progressive "Rage For Order."
1984's "Warning" set the stage for "Rage For Order," but while the former seemed just a bit restricted by thin production if not overshadowed by the emergence of posers like Motley Crue (which held it in check while Q's peers like Judas Priest and Iron Maiden were gaining in popularity to rather mixed results), "Rage" broke the rules long before progressive metal bands like Dream Theater came to be. "Rage" explores man's deepest thoughts ("I Will Remember"), his existence in a faceless world of technology ("Screaming in Digital") and his place within a frighteningly fascist regime ("Neue Regel") - each concept a part of the total Queensyche mythology at that time.
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Format: Audio CD
While I was a big fan of "Queen of the Reich", this one was an amazingly incredible suprise in the summer of 1986, when bubble-gum hair-bands were in full force. Unlike the somewhat inaccessible 'The Warning' (1984), this one combined all of the previous narrative elements of Queensryche's music in a collection of relatively short, catchy, and brilliantly-produced tunes. There was both sci-fi imagry and psychological distres right alongside edgy love songs - it was an utter crime that some of these songs were not released and promoted as singles. Quite simply, 'Rage for Order' is the perfect Queensyrche record:
1. Walk in the Shadows. Short and sweet, with a dark and catchy melody and one of Geoff Tate's most amazing vocal performances EVER (matched only by their debut, "Queen of the Reich" (1983) and "Neue Regel" from this record), this is the only song that has retained a place in the live sets since 1986. (Note: A nice live version is included on this remaster.)
2. I Dream in Infared. It was clear that Queensyrche made an attempt at commercializing their music with this record, and as such, many fans fault them for the introduction of love songs. Nonetheless, as with many of their love songs, this one has an edginess that keeps it real. (NOTE: There is an all acoustic version, orignally included as a b-side to a 1991 single, included with the 'Empire' remasters.)
3. The Whisper. The guitar runs on this tune, along with the vocal performance, makes this one of the best and most underrated Queensryche tunes ever. (Why has this not retained a place in the live set.)
4. Gonna Get Close to You. The fact that this atmospheric, psychological piece about a stalker was released as a single and sole video from the record may explain why it never took off.
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Format: Audio CD
As much as I hear time and again that "Mindcrime" was the Seattle quintet's finest, I always have to argue that this 1986 gem is the pinnacle of their career. While I was a big fan of Mindcrime and it's predecessor "The Warning", Rage For Order is QR's most consistent release and is mezmerising from start to finish. In a word.."perfect".

So few bands can boast having made a perfect album. I can think only of The Beatles (Sgt. Pepper & Revolver to name a few), Pink Floyd (The Wall, Dark Side), Dream Theater (Images & Awake), and Boston (Debut). Rage is an album to be listened to and appreciated. Released in the hey-day of "hair metal", this album has not one single song that lends itself to the tag. None of the songs, while very image provoking, could be easily made into an MTV hit. Although "Gonna Get Close To You" aired on MTV (rarely I might add) it didn't even scratch the surface of this album's potential.

Overall, the performances of each member outshine anything before, or since. DeGarmo and Wilton trade licks masterfully. Rockenfield and Jackson keep a very tight bottom end. Tate...well...Tate was THE metal singer at that time and this was his finest performance.

While the mix was somewhat lacking, the production was incredible. Each song blends into each other perfectly. This was metal that was unique and completely original. I think the term "thinking man's metal" was coined at the time. That said, I can think of no other release at the time to which that term could be applied. Unlike most of their metal contemporaries at the time, Rage was athmospheric, intellectual, and surreal. Rage succeeded where Priest's "Turbo" failed abysmally. It was a stark vision of the future and the metal was more futuristic than we'd ever heard before. It was like listening to a whole new machine. It still holds it's own 20 year later, seeming as fresh and "now" as anything in progressive metal.
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