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Raising Financially Fit Kids Paperback – December 5, 2003

4.7 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Money, a powerful factor in family dynamics, is often a difficult subject for families to address. Godfrey aims to help parents send their children into the world as financially savvy adults by identifying 10 specific skills that can be mastered by children ages 5 through 18. These include saving, keeping track of money, spending wisely, living on a budget, investing, handling credit responsibly, and using money to help others. Godfrey contends that her advice is for parents of every income level because the same financial issues confront those with means as confront those with few resources, regardless of race, class, culture, or political orientation. While this book conveniently doubles as an infomercial for her consulting practice, it does offer valuable insight into an important subject. Mary Whaley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

“I want to commend you on the Raising Financially Fit Kids newsletter. Each issue is informative. Thanks for the time and energy you put into it.”
—R. Quirk, Federal Reserve Bank

“I look forward to this every month and find it useful already with my five-year-old.”
—Toodi Gunter, Columnist, Business Week

“Once again Joline Godfrey sets the standard on the financial literacy front. All the tips today’s parents need are within this richly packed volume: Joline offers up age-appropriate lessons for each stage of a young person’s financial journey. No one does it better.”
—Whitney Ransome and Meg Milne Moulton, Executive Directors, National Coalition of Girls’ Schools

“Financial literacy is listed in Faith Popcorn’s Dictionary of the Future as a service being offered by a growing number of investment firms for their clients. Godfrey’s book gives us yet another terrific tool with which to support the needs of our clients.”
—Carol Malnick, Partner, Nelson Capital
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press (December 5, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580085369
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580085366
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,037,437 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is the best guide to teaching kids about money. I've got 3 small and busy kids and not much time to read. This book is great because it's easy (but not insulting) and offers concrete activities - outlined in charts (minimal reading required). One of the best things about this book is that it makes you think about your own money values and how you express yourself with money. Then it gives you ideas of how to teach your kids about money in a way that matches YOUR family's ideas...and it gives tips on how to "tweak" the message, depending on your children's personalities. The book is divided into age-appropriate sections, so advice for parents of 5 year olds is different from that of parents of 9 or 13 or 18 year olds. This is a great book you will use for years.
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Format: Paperback
I hate to be the dissenting voice, but I bought this book to help me teach my children to be Financially Fit, and I don't think I got what I paid for. I am a financial advisor, so I have a pretty good grasp of the concepts, I just need help translating them and delivering them at opportune times to my 7 and 10 year old boys. My goal here is to make sure that when my kids leave the house they understand what basic investments are, how to allocate their spending between needs, wants, and saving for the future, basic budgeting skills, and an understanding of how debt works and how much it costs over time. What this book contained were lots of tips to encourage your children to become activists, give to charities and use their money to change the world. Not that I am against any of those things; when my 10 year old saw a sad-eyed puppy commercial for the ASPCA, he gave me some of his savings and I cheerfully mailed a check. I know how to teach my children about giving to charity, but that isn't what I bought this book for, and it isn't what the title implies.

There are some helpful ideas to teach your kids financial concepts in this book, the Sample Lifestyle Budget she provides is excellent. The proposed scavenger hunt to the mall idea is horrifying. Ms Godfrey proclaims that "shopping is entertainment." Whaaat? This is exactly what I'm trying NOT to encourage in my children. Later in the book she says that yoga is helpful in calming the high you get from shopping- also she recommends meditation, exercise and a cup of tea. Really?

I bought this book because I wanted to know how and when to explain this stuff to to my 7 year old who, just last week when told that a price of an item was too much, told me I should just write a check for it.
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Format: Paperback
If you're like me and millions of other parents, aunts, uncles, etc. you don't feel equipped to teach the kids in your life about money because of your own issues. Raising Financially Fit Kids helped me get beyond my money paralysis by encouraging me to realize that it's important to start somewhere, even if it's just with baby steps. The author, Joline Godfrey, reminds us that money is a tool, not an end into itself, to be used to impart the type of values we hope our children will develop during their financial apprenticeship. The content is first rate and the design easy to navigate. I highly recommend it.
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Format: Paperback
Teaching kids about money is a challenge Joline Godfrey tackles beautifully. Do we share our budgets with them or shield them from the harsh reality of adult life? How much is too much - allowance, birthday money, "fun" money? Can we keep our kids from ammassing unmanageable credit card debt when they get older? Joline Godfrey offers practical advice that is reasonable and accessible for people of average, above average and below average means alike. Let's teach our kids more effectively than we were taught!
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Format: Paperback
Raising Financially Fit Kids provides outstanding "real world applications" for teaching money skills to the kids in your life. We've completed several of them with nieces and nephews. The kids have fun and learn great skills. We've learned along with them. This book is not only visually appealing, but incredibly well designed with flip out charts of activities. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone with kids, or a desire to expand their own money skills!
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By A Customer on February 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
How exciting to see the lessons of financial responsibility presented in a family friendly manner! The icing on the cake is the attention to sharing financial resources and taking seriously the welfare of those outside your immeidate family. In a time when kids, and adults, are attracted by How To Be A Millionaire or Homes of the Rich and Famous, the message that financial know how can be used for more than our own personal gain is sorely needed. This book would be good not only for families, but in classrooms and club settings. Well done!
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Format: Paperback
This book teaches parents how to share every day money lessons with their children. It is easy to read and has great examples. I highly recommend that every parent buy and read this book. As the book states it is not all about the money but about raising great kids!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In a TED Talk, on `What we learned from 5 million books,' speakers Erez Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel share the idea that you must find the interception of the `awesome' and the `practical.' This is especially true with financial education. While financial education is incredibly important or `practical,' the traditional teaching of financial education can be "boring" to kids. Joline's book is chalked full of creative ideas that perfectly find the interception of practical and awesome: ranging from mall scavenger hunts, to financial films and charity cafes.

The creative ideas along with the education of how to do this right and a game plan by age and stages, make this one of the best financial parenting books out there. Working with parents to develop financial parenting plans, I have been using the original version of this book for a decade and have found it invaluable. This updated version takes it to the next level. Joline's life work is financial education; her years of experience and wisdom shine through with the ideas in the book. There are tons of financial parenting books on the market, and having read most of them, I have found this to be one of the very best.
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