Kindle Price: $12.99

Save $3.01 (19%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Real Cost of Living: Making the Best Choices for You, Your Life, and Your Money by [Ulrich, Carmen Wong]
Kindle App Ad

The Real Cost of Living: Making the Best Choices for You, Your Life, and Your Money Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$12.99

Length: 271 pages Word Wise: Enabled

Get unlimited access to the world's best-selling magazines
One low monthly price, 100s of your favorite titles. > Try Texture FREE
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Carmen Wong Ulrich is an expert contributor to The Dr. Oz Show and Glamour's personal finance columnist. She is the former host of CNBC's daily personal finance show On the Money and can be seen regularly on Today, MSNBC, and Extra. She has appeared on The View, NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams, CNN, HLN, Rachael Ray, and the CBS Early Show. She is the author of Generation Debt: Take Control of Your Money-A How-To Guide; has a master's degree in psychology from Columbia University, Teachers College, and a B.A. from Fairfield University; and lives with her family in Brooklyn.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1048 KB
  • Print Length: 271 pages
  • Publisher: TarcherPerigee (December 28, 2010)
  • Publication Date: December 28, 2010
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0046ECF4A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,248,692 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Alain B. Burrese TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
Each decision we make has consequences, both costs and benefits. And costs are not always financial, but can be personal. "The Real Cost of Living: Making the Best Choices for You, Your Life, and Your Money" by Carmen Wong Ulrich is a book that can help you make better decisions that involve money, but are not all about money. I like that the book looks at other costs associated with the topics in this book, and not just at the price tag or how much money is involved. Across the top of the back cover there is a line that says, "Life Isn't Always About Money." That is so true, and this book will help people recognize some of the other ingredients, costs, and benefits from the decisions one makes.

The book opens with an introduction that illustrates that even small choices we make can cost more than we realize, and encourages readers to look at pros and cons to make the best choices. The first chapter is one the real cost of home. Sure, when you buy a home you have to pay the negotiated price, and depending on what rate of interest you receive if you finance the purchase, that accounts for a monetary figure of what a house costs to most people. This chapter makes you look at some of the other costs.

Chapter two looks at the real cost of marriage and divorce. This includes looking at weddings and actual divorces, but also the aftermath of these and other surprises. The third chapter addresses the cost of family. As a father, I know the cost to the hospital when your child is born is minor compared to other costs of raising kids. I'm sure all parents will agree. This chapter provides some things to think about.

Chapter four focuses on college and various considerations when thinking about higher education.
Read more ›
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The Real Cost of Living" was an absolutely outstanding read. I first learned of it though the Daily Worth newsletter, and instantly bought it for my Kindle (and yes, for $1.00 extra than the actual book itself, for which I'm sure the author would scold me).

In the interest of full disclosure, I am not a finance person. I hate numbers. I still use my fingers to count (I'm not an idiot, I promise). That being said, this book is written by a social science graduate about finance -- i.e. something I could understand, relate to, and wasn't just about numbers. As such, as a self-proclaimed idiot with numbers, if I can understand the entirety of this book and LOVE it, you can, too. Seriously.

Ulrich is funny and gives it to you straight. The book covers everything from homeownership (and when it makes sense to rent), mortgages, college, marriage / divorce, babies, saving / spending, owning your own business, bad habits (smoking, being overweight, etc.), and the stock market. Yes, all of that. She acknowledges the emotional side of home ownership, getting that advanced degree, etc., and ensures you're aware she understands it's sometimes not only about numbers. There are numbers contained in the book (charts too), of course, it's a book on finance, but all examples are easily understood.

Ulrich includes a significant amount of resources / links to check into for further reading, which was great. I got to around 70% complete on my Kindle and realized I was done with the book -- so 30% is resources and citing her sources for statistics. With 70% reading (and charts) and 30% additional resources and backing up statistics, you have more than enough to satisfy the number lovers as well as those who love numbers a little less.

I highly, highly, highly recommend this book!!
2 Comments 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I so hoped this book would provide some good solid advice but it turned out to be little more than anecdotal stories without much empirical data to back it up. Instead of hard facts it proved more personal opinion along with what most people intuitively already know. For example in talking about stocks, she states "We tend to sell winners too early and losers too late. We're human." Not exactly Nobel Prize material for economics. I wanted something more solid. Save your money - the real cost of this book was $14.95 and several hours of wasted time reading it. This book was not a good investment.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found parts of this book hard to get through (I am a financial novice and don't know all the lingo and rules of moving/saving/spending your money, but the author lays it out in a way that was simple enough for me to follow, though a few parts were so technical they seemed dry and I had to push through them instead of reading voraciously.) I appreciated that the author isn't trying to cram her opinions down your throat. She gives you real information set in a sort of pros and cons list to choices you might face financially. She weighs both sides and then leaves the decision up to you, because she thinks YOU are the person most likely to guide YOU well. Each person has a different situation and set of values so they need different financial advice. She tries to inform you about different scenarios and then she encourages you to think about what YOU want out of your money.

For instance, her opinion on owning a home seems to be that owning isn't better than renting, unless it is cheaper in the long run (after closing costs, possible downturn in market values, considering how long you plan to live in that house, etc.) But she also acknowledges that for some people the feeling of pleasure or security they feel being "home owners" is so satisfying to them, that maybe the house is worth buying, even if they end up losing money on it. She goes into not only how people think about money, but also how they feel and what drives them toward the things they value. The author's advice is straightforward and reasonable, though basing major financial decisions on her advice alone isn't recommended by me. She feels like a friend just trying to help out and doesn't come off as pushy or a know-it-all, which I really appreciated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Real Cost of Living: Making the Best Choices for You, Your Life, and Your Money
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Real Cost of Living: Making the Best Choices for You, Your Life, and Your Money