Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Reasonable Doubts: The Criminal Justice System and the O.J. Simpson Case Reprint Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0684832647
ISBN-10: 068483264X
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$9.06 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$18.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
36 New from $1.90 66 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $44.95
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Featured titles on Prisons and Justice System
Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
$18.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Reasonable Doubts: The Criminal Justice System and the O.J. Simpson Case
  • +
  • Outrage: The Five Reasons Why O. J. Simpson Got Away with Murder
  • +
  • The Run of His Life: The People v. O. J. Simpson
Total price: $43.13
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

Review

. . . Its main argument is quite interesting. . . . -- The New York Times Book Review, Nicholas Lemann

About the Author

Alan M. Dershowitz is a Brooklyn native who has been called "the nation's most peripatetic civil liberties lawyer" and one of its "most distinguished defenders of individual rights." He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Trials of Zion, Rights from Wrongs, and the #1 New York Times bestseller Chutzpah.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Reprint edition (February 19, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068483264X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684832647
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #365,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
When the OJ verdict came out, my wife and I were on a West Coast road trip. When the innkeepers found out I was an attorney, they would invariably ask me what I thought about the verdict. I replied that OJ probably killed his ex-wife. But OJ went free because of the many mistakes the police and prosecution committed, including giving the glove to OJ. (Rule no. 1: never have a hostile witness conduct a demonstration. Ever. Even if you think the demonstration is fail-proof.)
This book confirms my hunches, which were certainly less informed than Dersh's. It also discusses all the different policies that go into our criminal justice system, in a language laypeople can understand.
After you read this book, you'll understand that "probably guilty" is not enough to convict. You'll also know that most people had more information than the jury, and that the jury had to base their verdict upon the evidence presented at trial, rather than all the facts and factoids floating around.
Ultimately, while the book may not convince you that (a) OJ didn't kill them (the book didn't try to that) or (b) OJ's guilt was not proven beyond a reasonable doubt, it will provide you with a better understanding of the criminal system.
2 Comments 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I don't know about you but I was totally engrossed when the OJ Simpson trial was on TV. So naturally when everyone from Johnnie Cochran to the man who bagged OJ's groceries the day of the murder starting writing a book about it, I started reading hoping to get some good evaluation of the case. As a student of history and political science I wanted to know what the people involved with the case thought. Of course almost every book is an opportunity for an ego trip, a defense of misguided actions, or a chance to rocket to the best seller list on the backs of history's most publicized criminal trial. No one actually spoke to anything valuable. And then there's Alan Dershowitz. Dershowitz was retained as an appellate lawyer and for his expertise in constitutional law. When Robert Shapiro, skip his book by the way, retained him he asked if he would educate the public on the case. As a teacher Dershowitz couldn't refuse. And he's still teaching. The book answers questions that have been on everyone's mind since the trial. Just read the table of contents and you won't be able to put it down.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There have been two (more actually) high profile trials featuring around the clock, wild-eyed reporting and commentator-frenzy that resulted in surprising verdicts- at least to the people that watched the media madness. They were the O.J. Simpson and Casey Anthony trials. What characterized both was that the juries were sequestered. They could not participate in the news hysteria. The juries saw facts and evidence as presented in the court and as validated as true or exposed as fraud via cross examination.

Afterward, the media and disappointed viewers accused the jurors of being racists, but everybody already knew that would happen.

This book details the facts and contradictions thereof as seen by the jury. You might consider the lens too small, but this is our system, these are our rules and attorneys extol their virtues. People may not like the verdict or the defendants, especially after the media trashing. But people cannot react to media editing and emphasis, sound bites, commentators, pundits, critics and polls- instead of facts.

The book identifies succinctly which "facts" were not precisely as presented in the news and explanations that never made the headlines. This well written volume assembles them compactly, not over several months of testimony and thousands of hours of legal time-wasting. It will shred many beliefs held by the news-hour observer. These facts, viewed all at once produce a different picture of the events and the trial than you have today. When I say "facts", everything in the book is in the trial record. This is not an independant investigation.

It is a powerful presentation. After reading it, you may not change your opinion of O.J. Simpson's guilt or innocence.
Read more ›
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Reasonable Doubts: The Criminal Justice System and the OJ Simpson Case by Alan M. Dershowitz

In reading this book I was pleasantly surprised by Mr. Dershowitz’s approach to relating the events of this trial. Mr. Dershowitz was a tenured Professor at Harvard, up until 2013 when he retired. During the OJ Simpson trail, he was part of the Defense, closely monitoring the trial in case an appeal had to be filed.

The contents of this book are not an attempt to ascertain whether OJ was actually innocent or guilty. This is a treatise on how the law actually works. At no point does Professor Dershowitz come out and call OJ innocent. This is a record of the trial, blow by blow, that gives the reader insight into why the verdict was for acquittal.

Reasonable Doubts are the deciding factors into whether or not a verdict is correctly made. That justice sometimes miscarries is a given. But this book shows what comprises “Reasonable Doubts.”

Sherlock Holmes once said it is not a matter of what you know; it is a matter of what you can prove. This is the basis of any court proceeding. The Jury is to consider the accused “innocent until proven guilty.” By the letter of the law, then; your opinion doesn’t matter. On the Jury you must decide on whether or not the prosecution has proven its case. In your own mind you may believe the person totally guilty. But the question is, would a reasonable person hearing the same facts that you have heard as a member of the Jury have reason to doubt part of the picture?

Professor Dershowitz takes us through a step by step recounting of where there were serious errors of judgment in the Prosecution’s case. Some of the mistakes were possibly not mistakes at all, yet there were enough certain mistakes to toss the balance.
Read more ›
3 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Reasonable Doubts: The Criminal Justice System and the O.J. Simpson Case
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Reasonable Doubts: The Criminal Justice System and the O.J. Simpson Case