Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $6.34 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Reborn: Journals and Note... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item is in good condition. May include some wear and creases on the cover. Fast shipping. Free delivery confirmation with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Reborn: Journals and Notebooks, 1947-1963 Hardcover – December 9, 2008

3.9 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$18.66
$1.82 $0.01

The Numberlys Best Books of the Year So Far
$18.66 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Reborn: Journals and Notebooks, 1947-1963
  • +
  • As Consciousness Is Harnessed to Flesh: Journals and Notebooks, 1964-1980
  • +
  • Against Interpretation: And Other Essays
Total price: $49.55
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. The first of three planned volumes of Sontag's private journals, this book is extraordinary for all the reasons we would expect from Sontags writing—extreme seriousness, stunning authority, intolerance toward mediocrity; Sontags vulnerability throughout will also utterly surprise the late critic and novelists fans and detractors. At 15, when these journals began, Sontag (1933–2004) already displayed her ferocious intellect and hunger for experience and culture, though what is most remarkable here is watching Sontag grow into one of the century's leading minds. In these carefully selected excerpts (many passages are only a few lines), Sontag details her developing thoughts, her voluminous reading and daily movie-going, her life as a teenage college student at Berkeley discovering her sexuality (bisexuality as the expression of fullness of an individual), and meeting and marrying her professor Philip Rieff, with whom, at the age of 18, she had David, her only child. Most powerful are the entries corresponding to her years in England and Europe, when, apart from Philip and their son, the marriage broke down and Sontag entered intense lesbian relationships that would compel her to rethink her notions of sex, love (physical beauty is enormously, almost morbidly, important to me) and daughter- and motherhood, and all before the age of 30. Watching Sontag become herself is nothing short of cathartic. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Rieff sensitively portrayed revered critic and novelist Sontag during her last days in Swimming in a Sea of Death (2008) and now continues to navigate the great sea of her legacy as editor of her journals. He didn’t want to open his mother’s private life to public eyes, but because her papers are available to scholars, he does so preemptively, granting readers access to the innermost thoughts of a genuine prodigy. In 1948, at age 15, Sontag asks, “And what is it to be young in years and suddenly awakened to the anguish, the urgency of life?” After starting college at 16, she fills her journals with passionate analysis of books, her intellectual ambitions, her struggle to accept her homosexuality, and the ecstasy and torment of her first lesbian relationship. Then, suddenly, this ardent seeker becomes a wife and mother. She loves her son, but marriage does not suit her, and her battle to reclaim her true self is one of several dramatic rebirths punctuating this electrifying record of Sontag striving to become Sontag. Two more volumes are planned. --Donna Seaman
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1 edition (December 9, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374100748
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374100742
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #902,716 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Steiner VINE VOICE on December 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Aside from David Rieff's overly meddlesome editing, this collection of journals is a penetrating, deeply personal portrait of the late Susan Sontag. Perhaps what is most astonishing in this scattering of notes, commentaries, and lists, is Sontag's astonishing precociousness. Her entries at the age of 16 bear the mark of a burgeoning intellectual of the first order. We are granted access (perhaps for the first time)to Sontag's personal life, and given her reclusive nature I couldn't help feeling that I was reading something that should not have been published. Still, what is most interesting here is Sontag, the young collector of ideas and works of art, living life the only way she knew how-with intellectual and moral "seriousness" and undying passion. A fantastically entertaining read.
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Her son notes that Susan Sontag's diary filled about a hundred notebooks. When she was ill she made sure her son knew where her diaries were kept. The diaries are self-revealing. The son has misgivings.

The diaries are filled with people, social engagements, musings, comments about literature and philosophy. Sontag's favorite high school teacher was blacklisted a few years after she graduated. Susan Sontag wondered how to make anguish metaphysical.

In a somewhat fictionalized version of her life, Sontag asserts she had always had a desire to go to Europe. Watching dancers she opines that every person has a mystery. A friend complains that Susan Sontag is not very sharp about other people, what are they thinking and what are they feeling. Her reading is hoarding.

The ideas and people Susan Sontag selects to focus on are described in lively fashion. The editing is perfect, unobtrusive.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
the editing is maddening. i have no tolerance for it. i love the journals and the notebooks, their halting unrestrainedness (as if she planned for them to be read), their candor, their (at times) bombast and naivete, but i become so frustrated with the editor's interference that at times, i have to put the book down.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really loved Sontag’s diary. It reveals her as a passionate intellectual, in pursuit of full living, one could even say of having it all – loving both sexes, reading all that she can get her hands on, coping with her wish to write, become an author herself. She also revealed herself as an uncertain woman, a woman who doubts her choices and has a hard time making decisions. But I really had trouble with the editor’s interventions. Having read a lot of published women’s diaries, I have never seen an editor’s commentary intervene with the author’s text. The editor’s comments should have been written in endnotes or footnotes, and should not have made a mess of the original text. I do not think the editor had bad intentions, but the result is really troubling, and it sometimes even made me mad! Nonetheless, I am looking forward to reading the second part of the journal, As Consciousness Is Harnessed to Flesh.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Always loved the cover photo of Susan Sontag. Too bad the writing inside is very serious with no lightheartedness at all. For a young person, Susan comes off as very sober and melancholy much of the time. The cover photograph offers a clue. See how she stares at the person taking the picture with haughty disdain? Susan looked down on the world from an intellectually privileged cliff. Yes, she was a noted thinker who affected a striking presence, and I've been intrigued w/ her for a while. No doubt about it she was an enigma. Sadly, her writing leaves me cold, and cold she was. Usually, I love reading journals because they often offer a valuable glimpse into a person's psyche. Superior journals and highly recommended would be those written by: Kenneth Tynan, Sylvia Plath and John Fowles. The single revelation of this book is Susan Sontag's lesbianism. She battles with it and never came out during her lifetime even though she was urged to do so. Therein lies the problem. The ultimate responsibility for any artist is to be true to themselves. Authenticity is paramount, and the emotional core of the individual seals the deal. The woman had a heavy dose of attitude, that's for sure, and no detectable sense of humor. Everything is serious and high brow all the time - like living inside an Ingmar Bergman movie. If she ever lightened up - and I assumed she did - that never enters into this journal. Also, Sontag was very much European in her brain, and her tastes consistently travel in that direction: European music, literature and film.

I echo the other reviewer's comments about the heavy editorial hand Susan Sontag's son, David Rieff, plays in this journal. He is overly intrusive and explains many things which are quite apparent.
Read more ›
4 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
It depends on what you want to get from the memoirs of Sontag. I bought this book for two reasons: 1. I wanted to know more about her lesbianism in her early days; 2. I was fascinated by occasional witty (if not cynical) entries. Her words offered me unique insights and visions that could only come from an intellectual and educated scholar.

However, many of the entries recorded many banal and meticulous details that would only amuse Sontag scholars. And they in turn become the tedious part that kills the joy of reading this significant book published after her death.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews