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Recovering The Satellites

4.3 out of 5 stars 179 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Counting Crows - Recovering The Satellites - Cd

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Recovering the Satellites may not be quite the tower of song that the Crows' debut August and Everything After was, but it could hardly be called a sophomore slump. Vocalist Adam Duritz and crew mine similar territory on the more densely produced Satellites, couching tales of dreamers, lovers, and losers in music that's part classic rock redux and part heartfelt folk jangle. As able as the band is though, it remains Duritz's show, and his plaintive voice and serpentine lyrics are what drive this record home, particularly on "Daylight Fading," "Miller's Angels" and the aching hit "A Long December." --Michael Ruby
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 15, 1996)
  • Original Release Date: October 15, 1996
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Geffen
  • ASIN: B000000OVA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (179 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,940 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By P Magnum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 21, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Recovering The Satellites is the Counting Crows follow-up to their monster hit August & Everything After. While it is not as immediately accessible as their radio-friendly debut was, this album is a step forward creatively and artistically. The sound on the album is richer and more dense and Adam Duritz's lyrics more searching and mature. The band really came into its own with this release. Songs like the "Another Horsedreamers Blues" which contains a heavy orchestration and biting lyrics show their growth. The band still knows how to grab your ear with the hard driving "Angels Of The Silence", the strong title track, the soaring "A Long December" and the jangling "Daylight Fading". The best track on the album is the sweet and touching "Goodnight Elisabeth" which Mr. Duritz sings with understated grace. While it isn't the classic their debut is, the band showed it wasn't a fluke and they lived up to the potential that the first album created.
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Format: Audio CD
While this may not be a popular opinion, I have always felt that "Recovering the Satellites" is the best album Counting Crows have put out. Duritz's lyrics, which can come across as whiny and annoying when set to a calmer backdrop, are embodied perfectly in this infused set of driven, artsy rock compositions. The tasteful, sparse use of strings throughout the album enhances the emotional impact of the songs, and the wide variety of song structures and styles brings an almost epic scope to the album. You will find the Crows exploring everything from straight-ahead power rock ("Angels of the Silences") to country-tinged pop/rock ("Daylight Fading") to more colorful explorations of sound and style ("Mercury") to the piano/jangly rock Counting Crows are known for ("Goodnight Elizabeth"). Yet despite this wide stylistic scope, "Recovering the Satellites" feels like a complex and rich journey that unfolds, climaxes, and resolves itself with wondrous grace. The hooks present on this album are stronger than any on their debut (with the exception of the overplayed single "Mr. Jones") and the generally harder sound just makes for a more engaging listen. After the excellence of "Recovering the Satellites", I suspected that they would have trouble producing a worthy follow-up, and behold -- "This Desert Life" was simply a regression to the more predictable classic-rock influenced "August and Everything After". There is no doubt in my mind that this has much to do with the lukewarm reception of "Recovering the Satellites", which alarmed many fans who preferred the folkier sound of their debut. One can only hope that they will once again get motivated to explore new musical ground and refuse to stick to predictable formats simply to satisfy fans.
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Format: Audio CD
This is supposedly Adam Duritz's favorite of all their albums and it is mine as well. The Crows got their bearings on their instruments and are coupled with Duritz's painful lyrics. It is definetly the darker and moodier of their four studio albums and it worth a second listen. If you loved August and Everything After chances are you'll at least like this one.
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
I've had this album for over 15 years now but the CD was recently stolen so I bought the digital copy. It's fantastic. A worthy follow up to Augut and Everything After. This album feels just like the name, an attempt to find yourself, to pull back in to the center all the parts of yourself that have spun off into the world. It's not overly bright and sunny in that regard but it reflects a more mature look at the hard work required to really figure yourself out. This album does what so many second albums try and fail to do: it shows the artist growing while still providing enough connections back to the original sound that drew you in to make you want to stay and see it happen.
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Format: Audio CD
One of the most disappointing things I hear about Counting Crows is that nothing they've released is as good as August and Everything After. This is just not the case. August is great, don't get me wrong. It's one of my favorite albums. But I really think that Recovering the Satellites is the best thing they've ever put out (and I have all but one of their CDs... missing only By The Time We Got To Woodstock).
When I first got this album, I was disappointed too. It's not August and Everything After. Since that was the CD that made me fall in love with them, I was upset. But the more I listened, the more it grew on me. In the beginning, all I heard was Adam saying that he couldn't handle being famous. But when you read a little deeper into the lyrics, you can relate it to your life as well. The whole album is about wishing people would look past the first thing they see and find out who you really are underneath.
This album is full of all the great, powerful prose and soul-searching melodies that made August great, it's just not the same thing. If you're looking for the light and airy Adam from August, then get This Desert Life. It has a lot of the same feeling as August. But if you're looking to get a little deeper into the mind of a genius, this is definitely the album to check out.
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