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Religion and Nothingness (Nanzan Studies in Religion and Culture)

4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0520049468
ISBN-10: 0520049462
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Frequently Bought Together

  • Religion and Nothingness (Nanzan Studies in Religion and Culture)
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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Japanese (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Nishitani Keiji is Professor Emeritus of Kyoto University. His collected writings currently number thirteen volumes, including "Religion and Nothingness" (1949; University of California Press, 1982). Yamamoto Seisaku is Professor of Philosophy at Kyoto University. James W. Heisig is a permanent fellow of the Nanzan Institute for Religon and Culture in Nagoya, Japan. D. S. Clarke is Professor of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
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Product Details

  • Series: Nanzan Studies in Religion and Culture (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 366 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (October 6, 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520049462
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520049468
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #533,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another guy I wish I'd met while he was on this side of the divide. Not a light read, but fairly accessible. And unlike most in this genre, I find that even short, random browsings deliver insight and enjoyment. Perhaps all real Zen teaching is holographic - any snippet encodes the whole.
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Format: Paperback
Discussing Buddhism and Christianity together, might seem a little strange, but adding Nietzsche to the mix makes for something truly unique. The title first drew me to the book, as it spoke to my vague sense that the corrct way to address my spiritual doubts was to dive into them. I can't speak of what Keiji intended to communicate, or why those better educated in religion or philosophy would be interested in this book. I read it as "personal spirituality", though it took a long time and I probably wouldn't have finished if I'd been living somewhere that I had a TV or internet access or a car. I don't know if it's the fault of the translation or it's part of Keiji's style, but I'd have a hard time paraphrasing what the book was about. And yet, I understand. Or there are many things I understand better from having read this book.

I found it interesting to consider how Buddhism can correct those aspects of Western rationality which have corrupted the practice of Christianity. Sorry, that probably doesn't help much.
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Format: Paperback
The basic underlying thoughts in this book are wonderful, and ultimately very trenchant and prophetic in their critique of nihilism. That is, if you can distill what those thoughts are. Of course, that it should all be devoted to classic notions of idiomatic Zen No-Mind adds a layer on top, almost as if you were talking with Jewish New Yorker with a heavy accent, and you couldn't tell if he were speaking of "The Void" or "The Word" in discussing classic Logo-centric philosophy. The real issue with this book, for most readers, would likely be that the fact that Nishitani was a student of Heidegger's (during the 1930's in Germany-gulp!) is something very evident on every single page. He out-Heideggers Heidegger, and boy that takes a lot. Further, when one remembers that famous quip that you should never read heidegger in the original language, and instead choose a more comfortable translation, we have a sense of the labyrinthine and potentially off-putting hermeneutical circle in which this book exists. I only wish I knew Japanese, so I could say this with more emphasis. But it would seem that the straight-forwardness of Japanese would be a hard linguistic locus in to which to situate the Heideggarian metaphysical nugget of meaning and philosophical delectation. I think that is the right way of putting it, because there does seem a sort of aesthetic predilection at work here, yet operating in the background. As to the foreground, the actual translation, it is comprehensible only if you have a lot of Heidegger under your belt. Which I did when I first read this book , and loved it. On the other hand, from a artistic point-of-view of word-smithery, this book in this translation seems almost like a parody.Read more ›
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