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Representation and Inference for Natural Language: A First Course in Computational Semantics (Studies in Computational Linguistics)

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1575864969
ISBN-10: 1575864967
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"An exciting combination of standard Montague techniques, modern approaches to underspecification, and the use of first order theorem provers, all in a book that can be used by advanced undergraduates or graduate students." - Robin Cooper, Gorg University"

About the Author

Patrick Blackburn is director of research at INRIA, France's national organization for research in computer science. Johan Bos is senior researcher at the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Information (April 6, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1575864967
  • ISBN-13: 978-1575864969
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #533,124 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If you view the history of Natural Language Processing research from a certain vantagepoint, you can see a river running. The river has two banks: the procedural side, and the logical side.

Carl Hewett, living on the procedural side of the river, invented a language called "Plannner" and emphasized that knowledge consists in the ability to *do* things--to execute procedures.

Alain Colmerauer, living on the logical side of the river, invented a language called "Prolog", and emphasized that the knowledge consists of propositions which we can reason about and draw conclusions from.

On the procedural bank, Terry Winograd used Planner to create SHRDLU, a tour-de-force in Natural language processing, which showed how to make a NLP interface which could answer an impressive range of questions about blocks on a table. It could also make and execute plans involving building things with blocks. In his writings, Winograd emphasized the procedural nature of NLP understanding.

On the logical bank, Colmerauer, Rousssel, and coleages, created a French question-and-answer system which for the first time showed that every step of natural language processing, from tokenization to parsing to database query, can be performed by pure logical deduction.

Robert Kowalski was one of the first to percieve that both of these research programs were banks of the same river. As Hewett observes, Prolog reallly can be viewed as a version of Planner. The resulting vision is a stunning synthesis: Doing things can be viewed as theorem proving, and theorem proving can be viewed as doing things. There is no conflict between the proceedural and logical views--indeed they are two sides of the same coin.
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Format: Paperback
Anyone who has had to implement any kind of NLP system that even attempts to represent semantics

will find Patrick Blackburn, and Johan Bos book refreshing and informative. So much of the material out there is either completely theoretical or the material only introduces very

introductory level examples.

Representation and Inference for Natural Language is a winner. This book presents a legitimate theoretical

introduction and well thought out examples and source code.

The experiment approach that is used in the book takes the reader through various possibilities

demonstrating their strong points and short fallings and then provides the user with

viable (real) solutions both in a theoretical fashion and in implemented source code.

Excellent job.

It has definitely helped me to implement in fairly high quality Q&A system.

Cheers to the authors!!!!!!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Beautifully laid out, the material is both theoretically interesting and useful in practice. The power of Prolog is made manifest. Though a few years old now, it's a classic that points to a future in which more powerful systems will allow for logic at scale.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good. Fast delivery
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