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Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization Hardcover – March 18, 2011

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“Powerful. . . . Bridges builds a thoughtful and important argument. . . . An enormously challenging and valuable book.”
(Rayna Rapp Anthropological Quarterly 2012-05-08)

“The richness of this book’s ethnographic accounts is truly extraordinary, as is a detailed discussion of federal and state programs. . . . Highly recommended.”
(Choice 2011-10-01)

“Her work should be read by everyone involved in delivering healthcare to those without class privilege.”
(Rayna Rapp Anthropological Quarterly 2012-01-01)

“A beautifully written and well researched ethnographic study of the delivery of prenatal and birth health care at one of our nation’s most preeminent public hospitals.”
(Laura Mamo American Journal Of Sociology 2012-03-01)

"Smart." "Eye-opening."
(Leslie Hinkson Social Forces 2015-02-01)

From the Inside Flap

“Bridges radically and actively demonstrates the truth of her claims through outstanding ethnography and analysis. Eminently praiseworthy.”—Robbie Davis-Floyd, author of Birth as American Rite of Passage and lead editor for British Models That Work

“An important and timely contribution to recent scholarship on race in science, medicine, and public health. From the first page, I did not want to put the book down.”—Lundy Braun, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Africana Studies, Brown University

“There is no doubt that this is an important topic, and one the author is well-positioned to explore. Very, very powerful."—Cheryl Mattingly, author of Healing Dramas and Clinical Plots

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 306 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (March 18, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520268946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520268944
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,763,996 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is wonderful! As a current BU medical student, I am so appreciative of the way she confronts the "biologic" notions of race both taught currently in medical schools and also practiced on a daily basis. For example, she confronts the use of an "African American" drug (BiDil) for heart failure, which is routinely prescribed for heart failure in black patients only despite the lack of evidence that there is any racial advantage to this drug, and furthermore the way it perpetuates racist notions of a biological origin of race and thereby developing medicines along this skewed belief. She writes about a wide variety of issues of race and medicine, which Dr. Bridges describes as her desire to write a book that is as "complex as race is" in our world. She demonstrates the nuances of this often generalized discussion, and as a current medical student I can't thank her enough for providing this book as a valuable resource for both patients and providers. This should be mandatory reading in all health profession schools!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a model of how to engage theoretical concepts aboiut biopower, state surveillance of bodies, the intersections of gender and race, and racial formations without losing sight of real people, their actions, and (at time limited) choices.
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It was as if the author was sitting with you telling her story...easy to read. I could relate to some of the situations and experiences, mostly having observed it while in waiting rooms. Thoroughly enjoyed it.
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Wondering about racism? Read this book. Written really well by an amazing, and extremely bright woman. Well researched and tells her story first hand.
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These are some of reviews of the book: DO NOT BUY OR READ!!!

All Nurses, please read! This is what is being said about us by another profession!

Khiara M. Bridges’ (2011) book “Reproducing Race” is insulting to read. On page 32, she calls nurses “ancillary staff”, whose training allows them to provide some [emphasized] health care services-namely administering injections, dispensing prescriptions and other medications, taking medical histories, and performing colposcopies and other noninvasive procedures.” My argument is that registered nurses do A LOT more than just that. We assess patients, we are often the first to recognize when something is wrong with our patients, and we even stop long enough to hold a patient’s hand (even though our bladder is full and we are starving). On page 33, Bridges talks about how those who sit at the front desk of a medical office “resided at the bottom of the clinic’s hierarchy.” Where I work, everyone is afforded the same respect. No one cares if you are a janitor, cafeteria worker, CNA, RN, intern, resident, or attending… everyone is equal. On page 33, she also talks about “how staff should treat the patients they serve.” This really bothered me, because the hospital she is speaking of (Alpha Hospital), a pseudonym for a hospital in New York, might not have patients that are speaking to the healthcare workers respectfully. The people are poor, uninsured, and denied by private hospitals. This does not mean that all that fit any of these criteria are rude. I just wondered if she (the author, an anthropologist and lawyer at Boston University) ever had to deal with patients calling them derogatory names for 12+ hours). She also mentions she would never work as frontline staff after this day.
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