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The Republic of Choice: Law, Authority, and Culture Hardcover – February 1, 1990

2.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Friedman's book is a bold, imaginative, and carefully reasoned effort to describe the major characteristics of modern American law and its underlying social norms. Law, he urges, is not an autonomous discipline; it grows out of changing popular demands and values. How and why popular legal culture changed during the last century and a half is one important theme of this work. (Maxwell Bloomfield The Catholic University of America)

This book synthesizes much that has been going on in American culture, both in general attitudes and more specifically with respect to law and legal culture. There are few legal scholars that have Friedman's breadth of background across a vast range of legal issues, and this shows in the wide variety of materials and examples that are brought to bear in behalf of his central thesis. The central theme that we are becoming a 'republic of choice' is given a fresh and inviting statement, one that will surely provoke interest. (Stanton Wheeler Yale Law School)

This is the first book that draws on the social research about law that has burgeoned in the last twenty years to produce a general interpretive characterization of contemporary American society. It is full of keen and original observations about the 'legal culture' and the public consciousness that informs and expresses it. (Marc Galanter University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School)

About the Author

Lawrence M. Friedman is Marion Rice Kirkwood Professor of Law at Stanford University and author of many books, including A History of American Law, Crime and Punishment in American History, and American Law in the Twentieth Century.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 255 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (February 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674762606
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674762602
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,216,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Kristyne Evanoski on April 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book has several interesting topics. However, the Author took a very dry approach and seems to ramble on too much. I am needing to read this book for a graduate course and I have to say I dread reading every chapter!
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