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Resentment: A Comedy Hardcover – June 16, 1997

2.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Since the mid-1970s, Gary Indiana has been making a name for himself as a renegade thinker and writer. In the Village Voice and Rolling Stone he created a new brand of highly personal, overtly political cultural commentary that has reshaped journalism. His novels and short stories are equally controversial. Resentment, his new novel, is a true hybrid of his art. Based on Indiana's coverage of the Menendez brothers' trial, the novel is an all-out, savagely funny attack on the media, the U.S. justice system, television, family, and Los Angeles. Indiana is relentless in his desire to expose the insanity that rages beneath the surface of U.S. life and determined to make us laugh out loud even as we shake our heads in sorry recognition.

From Library Journal

This cinematically structured black comedy focuses on a society gone mad. Seth is an embittered gay journalist on assignment in Los Angeles to cover a sensational murder trial reminiscent of that of the Menendez brothers. Like a Robert Altman film, the scenes shift between the tabloid fodder of the nationally televised trial and the ever-increasing difficulties and disappointments in the lives of Seth and his circle of friends. At times corrosively satiric and at others scatalogical and over the top, this novel reads like a cross between Nathaniel West and William S. Burroughs. Though journalist and novelist Indiana's (Gone Tomorrow, LJ 3/1/93) latest is at times uneven and occasionally rambling, there is an undeniable power in its mordant moral vision. For larger public libraries.
-? Lawrence Rungren, Merrimack Valley Lib. Consortium, Andover, Mass.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (June 16, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385484291
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385484299
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.8 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #155,481 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
... Indiana is one of the best, most incisive writers inAmerica. He's funny, ferociously angry, incredibly conversant, andhis books--including Resentment--put a frame around our culture's insanity. He's not only highly entertaining-he's necessary.
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Format: Paperback
Like some 19th century Russian, Indiana grapples with BIG issues of morality and the human condition. In his epic vision, Los Angeles comes across like Mortville, the nightmare town from John Waters' masterpiece Desperate Living. The hapless characters, each rendered frighteningly believable by witty, insightful prose, are all on collision courses with each other's wanton perversity and unchecked megalomania. Wickedly funny and unsentimental, Indiana is never unempathetic as he unflinchingly depicts the car crash of contemporary society. Can't we all get along? Perhaps not.
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Format: Paperback
Indiana takes a searching look of the Los Angeles I know, and more importantly, that I don't know. The presumptive topic of the book is told from the viewpoint of Seth, a writer out from New York to profile a bland, glossy movie star for a bland, glossy magaine, and when he can snag a seat, to cover the Menendez trial (here called the "Martinez" trial). There are almost too many diversions and subplots to count, but Indiana's stream-of-consciousness flow of words keeps the momentum going.
He manages to take potshots at Dominick Dunne, John Gregory Dunne, Joan Didion, Leslie Abramson, Scientologists, the Chateau Marmont, and a ton of other semi-recognizable names, but figuring out who's who isn't all that important.
Those who are repelled by gay sex and the demimonde probably should stay away. (...)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book made me reconsider my views on the Menendez brothers. The main character, Seth, is obviously the author, who covered the trial. He writes in an unusual, almost stream-of-consciousness style, which, along with the graphic (mostly gay)sex, will put off many readers. However, this book is never dull and often thought-provoking. The characters are fairly well-developed, though harshly treated. My only complaint is the end, which isn't awful, but neither is it especially satisfying.
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Format: Paperback
Like some 19th century Russian, Indiana grapples with BIG issues of morality and the human condition. In his epic vision, Los Angeles comes across like Mortville, the nightmare town from John Waters' masterpiece Desperate Living. The hapless characters, each rendered frighteningly believable by witty, insightful prose, are all on collision courses with each other's wanton perversity and unchecked megalomania. Wickedly funny and unsentimental, Indiana is never unempathetic as he unflinchingly depicts the car crash of contemporary society. Can't we all get along? Perhaps not.
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Format: Hardcover
Indiana's best book yet is a torrent of words which, for all its seeming randomness, is never off target. The gimmick here is a disguised retelling of the Menendez trial, but there's a lot more going on than that. In the end, Resentment is one of the most hateful, loving, and accurate portraits of Los Angeles.
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Format: Hardcover
if you have a compulsion to back check previous works, what you have here is the fictive scaffolding put in place by the same keen eye that finally elucidated the horrific connection between Walt Disney characters & the imagery of Francis Bacon (...we all felt it, we just hadn't thought about it...). there's little mercy for reader or character, in fact some episodes seem implanted like a surprise bowl of insects to make you squirm- but West Coasters will surely appreciate allusions to the beneath-the-surface activities of the OTO & Scientologists, the walk on cameos by Kathy Acker (in disguise, in memoriam?), psychokillers and annoying movie stars- all the SoCal fixtures a la Pynchon's 'Lot 49' or Stephen Wright's 'Going Native' are inflated to new lunatic proportions by Indiana's careening lingo.
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By A Customer on December 3, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The characters in this book are all easily identifiable, centering on the participants in the famous Menendez Brothers trial. Not one of the participants escapes Indiana's venomous attitude and ridicule. Even the minor characters involved in the fringes of the trial are objects of contempt. This trial involved real and serious issues, and Indiana has reduced them all to props to be aimed at, by him. Perhaps someone will write a novel with him as a character; there would be a lot to satirize. On top of it all, the book is sloppily written, as if he could hardly wait to set down his attack on living people.
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