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Restraining Rage: The Ideology of Anger Control in Classical Antiquity

ISBN-13: 978-0674013865
ISBN-10: 0674013867
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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In this comprehensive exploration of anger and self-understanding in the classical world, Harris (Columbia Univ.; Ancient Literacy) endeavors to show that ancient discourses on anger control were responses to political and social conditions. Since the Iliad, the oldest work in Western literature, has as its theme the anger of Achilles, Harris has astutely hit upon a fascinating theme. Following a cogent effort to reconcile ancient and modern terminology, Harris catalogs the authors who wrote treatises on anger control. He then attempts to find the political elements that inspired so much writing on the subject. Looking through a lens defined by anger and rage, Harris examines the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and Seneca and the histories of Polybius and Plutarch, among others. This includes examining the control of anger in light of the patriarchal family structure and issues of civility in the volatile relationship of slaves and masters. He concludes by pursuing the evolution of these thoughts in the early Christian traditions. Highly recommended for faculty and graduate students of classical antiquity. Clay Williams, Hunter Coll., New York
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

A remarkable book. Harris uses anger as a focal point for an examination of a very wide range of intellectual activity and social practices. The work ranges over theories of the emotions and the soul, the nature of civic life and politics, intra-familial conflict, marriage and attitudes toward women, slavery, and more. It is the most interesting, stimulating, and important book about ancient social and intellectual history that I have read in many years. (David Cohen, University of California, Berkeley)

Harris' new book focuses upon a central feature of the ancients' understanding of themselves, their obsession with anger in all its forms and their attempts to restrain at least its outward expression. Restraining Rage is brilliantly written, full of mordant insights, vastly and diversely erudite, and deeply committed not only to understanding the ancient world, but also our modern one. All in all, a marvelous book. (Glenn Most, University of Heidelberg and University of Chicago)

This book by a leading ancient historian is bound to become a standard reference point for anyone interested in the history of emotions in antiquity. It draws together a range of texts from Homer to Post-Constantinian Christianity, showing how they approach the common problem of anger control and how the "solution" changes over time. There is no book on this central issue in ancient culture that matches Restraining Rage's breadth and scope. (Mary Beard, University of Cambridge)

In this comprehensive exploration of anger and self-understanding in the classical world, Harris...endeavors to show that ancient discourses on anger control were responses to political and social conditions. Since the Iliad, the oldest work in Western literature, has as its theme the anger of Achilles, Harris has astutely hit upon a fascinating theme...Highly recommended. (Clay Williams Library Journal 2002-02-01)

Harris is known for ground-breaking books on Roman imperialism and on literacy in the ancient world. His new book, a vastly ambitious attempt to cover nearly every aspect of anger in antiquity from Homer to early Christianity, breaks fresh ground again. (M. F. Burnyeat London Review of Books 2002-10-17)

Why did the ancient Greeks and Romans find fault with anger? Why did they so insistently advocate the reining in or the elimination of angry emotions? Rather than offering a mere analysis of arguments presented in our primary texts, Harris's study undertakes to provide an answer from a social-anthropological perspective, taking due cognizance of the groups whose interests were served by the discourse of anger control in Greco-Roman antiquity. Most importantly, he demonstrates the relevance of his historical enquiry by relating it to discussions on the subject in our contemporary culture. (Johan Strijdom Scholia Reviews 2003-02-01)

Harris's thoughtful, massively docoumented book is a major contribution to our understanding of the classical world...Harris is excellent on the kinds of therapy that ancient thinkers proposed and applied to excessive rage...His book will be a major resource for anyone concerned with the history of the emotions, whether in antiquity or beyond. It is a great achievement. (David Konstan American Historical Review)
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"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

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