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Resurrection Explicit Lyrics

4.8 out of 5 stars 122 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Explicit Lyrics, October 4, 1994
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

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Media Type: CD
Artist: COMMON
Title: RESURRECTION
Street Release Date: 10/03/1994
Domestic
Genre: RAP/HIP HOP

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A couple of years after asking Can I Borrow a Dollar? and before he lost the "sense" in his moniker, the Chicago MC now known as Common dropped this impressive sophomore set, marking him as one of the most versatile MCs to emerge in the 1990s. Shirking the often derivative flows of his debut, Resurrection finds the Windy City rhymer ably assisted by the voluptuous jazzy excursions of producers No I.D. & Ynot. He revels in ear-tickling wordplay, slinging countless witty punchlines and similes on "Orange Pineapple Juice" and "Communism"--songs that require several listens to unravel. Far from relentless chest-thumping bravado, Common's lyrics have substance, exploring inner faults and fears on "Book of Life" and touching poignancy on his classic metaphorical ode to hip-hop culture, "I Used to Love H.E.R.," a track that is perhaps more relevant today than when it was released. The beginnings of Common's ongoing struggle between his boyish effusiveness and moral responsibility, which figures greatly in his subsequent releases, is captured on this essential release. --Del F. Cowie
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 4, 1994)
  • Parental Advisory ed. edition
  • Original Release Date: October 4, 1994
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • Label: Relativity
  • Run Time: 54 minutes
  • ASIN: B000003BXN
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (122 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,159 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Common has enjoyed a long and well praised career. Although it would be hard to say that his style hasn't changed (sometimes for better sometimes for worse), for the most part his concepts and views have not. With recent appearances it seems that Common is returning to where he began (check out Kanye's Get Em High, his spot on Chappelle's Show - Food, and Jada's remix to Why among others). But, Common's hunger and brilliance was first fully realized here.

One thing you cannot fail to mention when talking about Resurrection is NO I.D. who produces all but two tracks on the album. The tracks he made for this album are beautiful; it's always made me wonder what happened to him (although he's shown up again recently on Ghostface's Pretty Tony album). Even more mysterious is the albums other production credit goes to Ynot, who's disappearance is even more drastic (barring this album I've never herd him mentioned). Regardless the two provide a stellar backdrop for the album with their production. All the beats in general are very jazzy and sample heavy. Almost all tracks do NOT have your typical chorus (and absolutely NO R&B hooks), instead replaced by repeated relevant samples (DJ Premier style if you will).

The album opens up with the appropriately titled Resurrection accompanied by scratches proclaiming the same. Nice smooth production over a jazzy piano loop, as Common just seamlessly flows over the beat. Great opener, also a nice touch of bringing the beat back after the fade out. In general Common's ability to flow over the beats on these albums is incredible, especially when you consider he actually switches it up.

I Used to Love H.E.R. is probably the most well know song on the album. This was the first time the concept was used.
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Format: Audio CD
This album is full of memories for me, and is bittersweet; it's both one of the greatest hip-hop albums ever and one of the last. Everything in rap music, including Common's (he'll always be Common Sense to me) own efforts, have disappointed since then. In fact, as hard as I've looked, as long as I've waited, I'm pretty sure hip-hop doesn't exist anymore.

I like calling this the Greatest Hip-Hop Album Ever. It's probably not true but it doesn't matter to me; I've heard a lot of rap music but never anything so in line with true musicianship (there's something else that doesn't exist anymore...)

Anyway this fits somewhere in league with "Midnight Marauders" for musical sensibility and "Enter The Wu-Tang" for innovation and brash nonconformity. In many ways it surpasses them both.

So pick this up if you've never heard it. It's so intensely musical (thanks to No ID's once-in-a-lifetime production) it doesn't require you to like rap music at all. Common's lyrics are clever and occasionally brilliant, and his delivery top-notch. If you are a rap fan and haven't heard this, you've missed out. If you are a fan and think of this album as confusing, soft and uninspired, shame on you; this was the peak the music will never again reach.
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Format: Audio CD
Sometimes there are artist who virtually come from no where and releases an LP that are considered one of the best albums of a generation. In Hip Hop, Common Sense's Resurrection is that album. Common's first album, Can I Borrow A Dollar? was a solid debut showing a very charismatic MC who was still developing his style and trying to find his niche in the Hip Hop world. On Resurrection, Common reemerge as an promiment MC with lyrics that are leaps ahead of his debut.
Make no mistake this is arguably the best display of lyricism in Hip Hop. All throughout the album Common uses multi-layered lyrics including evasive puns, punchlines and other literary techniques of writing that almost no Hip Hop album has been able to match thus far. Listening to this album for the past three years I am still picking up on puns that I did not catch listening the first hundred times. The prime example would be "Orangle Pineapple Juice" which probably has more wordplay than any other song I have heard. Other examples would be the title track, "Watermelon", "Communism" (where he plays with words beginning with "com") and "Sum S... I Wrote".
For those thinking that this album is only filled with braggadocio rhymes, think again. Common covers a wide variety of subject matter speaking on his life, being an MC in the rap world and expresing his love for Hip Hop. Over a hard drum and bass, Common tells of the problems of moving from adolesence to becoming a young adult on "The Book Of Life". Common executes this perfectly with quotables such as "I went to school for fourteen years and my best teacher was experience". This song is one of the highlights of the album and reaches all people as they move from adolescence to adulthood.
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Format: Audio CD
Common is at the peak of his lyrical genious on this album; it is really a very soulfully produced album, and Common uses more metaphors on the CD then. . . damn i dunno, he just uses a hellova lot of em.
Hell, if you want the biggest metaphor filled song in hip hop all you have to do is listen to track #2 "I used to love H.E.R". It has a suprise ending that will completely change the way you view the song's message when you hear it the second time around. TRUST ME, you will play the song over again when you hear that last line of the song. Hah, im not giving away the metaphor, it would ruin the suprise intended in the song.
Enough about Track #2 though, because you will find that this album is not simply about that song but about virtually every other track. For instance, the first track on the CD- "Resurrection" displays Commons hottest flows, while track #8- "Communism" displays the flexiblity of Common's lyrics ( there a many words in this track that start with "com-"; a perfect match for the name of the track, as well as his own name).
Bottom line, every track is very creative and even makes Common's year 2000 classic "Like Water For Chocolate" a little bit weak in comparrison.
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