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Rhythm, Country & Blues CD

4.8 out of 5 stars 116 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Nashville meets Memphis! This recording contains duets by the stars of R&B and country, including Vince Gill and Gladys Knight, Al Green and Lyle Lovett, Aaron Neville and Trisha Yearwood, Little Richard and Tanya Tucker, Clint Black and the Pointer Sisters and Natalie Cole and Reba McEntire.
Genre: Country & Western
Media Format: Compact Disk
Rating:
Release Date: 1-MAR-1994

Amazon.com

Where so many duet projects seem like shotgun marriages, this one sounds like a labor of love, celebrating Southern music as a common denominator that transcends racial and categorical divides. Among the highlights, the pairing of Lyle Lovett and Al Green finds revelation within the funky groove of "Funny How Time Slips Away," while the album-closing "Patches"--with George Jones playing father to B.B. King's son--achieves a spine-tingling majesty. Though Natalie Cole and Reba McEntire misconnect on "Since I Fell for You," Sam Moore (of Sam & Dave) and the late Conway Twitty are at their soulful best on "Rainy Night in Georgia." --Don McLeese
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 1, 1994)
  • Original Release Date: March 1, 1994
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: MCA Nashville
  • ASIN: B000002OR2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,061 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Mark Blackburn on January 8, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Did you ever read a book -- then read it again ten years later, and make the pleasant discovery that the parts you'd mentally underlined or highlighted years earlier, are NOT the same ones that `reach' you today? Witness, if you will, this amazing concept album, you may have forgotten (I had, almost.)

If you are like me, you may have almost forgotten this gem. If you're like my sister Andrea (who has the most amazing singing voice I've ever heard) you've NEVER tasted of its amazing grace.

'Sis,' who has refined musical tastes, last night dignified my latest review (for a Tom T. Hall compilation) by sniffing: "YOU'RE listening to country music now?? Ouch!!!" I resisted the urge to remind `Anra' about Ray Charles' classic country music album of 40 years ago (with the definitive version of Eddy Arnold's "You Don't Know Me").

Her comment made me go and rummage out this CD. Sure enough, there there it was: something I'd vaguely recalled from the superb liner notes, by James Hunter. A short quotation of the album's co-producer Tony Brown, from the days when he first worked with Gospel singer Shirley Caesar: "She had ALWAYS loved country music!"

----

Back in late 1994 when this album was released, it was Chet Atkins' duet with Alain Toussaint (on the latter's best selling composition, "Southern Nights") that prompted me to track down this disc in the first place. I'm pleasantly surprised to find this very day that, some tracks I didn't give a second listen to, back then, are now at center stage in my heart: As with good spiritual reading, when the light goes on, I am `lifted up.'

First things first: Amazingly, most of the singers featured here had never met before they got together in the studio with co-producer Don Was.
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Format: Audio CD
I never paid much attention to country music until I heard this collection of duets. The best voices of R&B with the best of country. What stands out? Conway Twitty and Sam (Sam and Dave) Moore doing "Rainy Night in Georgia," and Aaron Neville with Trisha Yearwood on "I Fall to Pieces." Many other fine collaborations, but these are memorable.
For anyone who loves country and r&b standards, who wants to hear talented voices in new territory, or who wants a well-rounded musical education, this MAY be the best album you can find.
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Format: Audio CD
Wonderful songs performed by artists from across racial and musical genre lines, reminds us how creativity can be enhanced when musicians make a conscious effort to break away from successful formulas and try something different. Lyle Lovett and Al Green's slow burn on "Funny How Time Slips Away" is the stand-out, but almost every track (exception -- Reba and Natalie Cole duet on "Since I Fell for You") is fun. Some, like Conway Twitty and Sam Moore's version of "Rainy Night in Georgia", underscore the common roots of country and r&b. This CD gets repeat listening at my house. n.b.--When this CD was released, the program director of Chicago's biggest country radio station was quoted in the Tribune as saying that he wouldn't give it airtime because too many people were trying to jump on the country bandwagon. This type of narrow thinking seems typical of the mainstream country music industry, and may explain why I've just about stopped listening to country radio.
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Format: Audio CD
... primarily about Don Was' project that came after this, but definitely sheds light on the attitude that produced it, particularly the artistic crisis he was going through. (No, I didn't have anything to do with the article.) Excerpt:
"Somehow, the thought of this dreadlocked, hippyesque man in a cowboy hat at a country concert is as bizarre a juxtaposition as the ones that are found in his music. And that is exactly the point. Exercising a limitless and all-encompassing musical taste, and combining many seemingly disparate and opposing musical elements is the essence of his approach. And he can therefore work with artists as diverse as George Clinton and Neil Diamond, or Maxi Priest and Paula Abdul, without batting an eyelid. This was exemplified in a project that laid some of the foundations for Forever's A Long, Long Time, namely the Rhythm, Country and Blues album (1995), on which he produced tracks that saw meetings between soul and country singers, like Al Green and Lyle Lovett. Was picked up the story: 'I've always felt that there was very little separation between R&B and country in terms of songwriting. These singers can perform each other's material without stretching at all. However, I do regret that I only started to be adventurous towards the end of recording that project, when we ran hip-hop beats underneath these country songs, messed with the chords a lot, and really re-invented the songs. Forever's A Long, Long Time is in a way an extension of that.'"
Obviously, some of the music profession still hasn't figured out what to do with music that truly crosses lines.
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Format: Audio CD
I've loved this CD from the first time i heard it in 1994 when i was working at a radio station until now when i recently purchased it (i wasn't even sure if it was still available). R&B artist like Little Richard is teamed up with country legend Tanya Tucker or Natalie Wood and Reba McEntire. The best song on the LP is The late Conway Twitty collaborating with Sam Moore (Sam & Dave) on a version of Brook Benton's, A Rainy Night in Georgia. That one song is worth the price of the Cd.
As I mentioned, get this one while it's still available.
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