The Right Stuff Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 290 customer reviews

ISBN-13: 978-0312427566
ISBN-10: 0312427565
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Tom Wolfe began The Right Stuff at a time when it was unfashionable to contemplate American heroism. Nixon had left the White House in disgrace, the nation was reeling from the catastrophe of Vietnam, and in 1979--the year the book appeared--Americans were being held hostage by Iranian militants. Yet it was exactly the anachronistic courage of his subjects that captivated Wolfe. In his foreword, he notes that as late as 1970, almost one in four career Navy pilots died in accidents. "The Right Stuff," he explains, "became a story of why men were willing--willing?--delighted!--to take on such odds in this, an era literary people had long since characterized as the age of the anti-hero."

Wolfe's roots in New Journalism were intertwined with the nonfiction novel that Truman Capote had pioneered with In Cold Blood. As Capote did, Wolfe tells his story from a limited omniscient perspective, dropping into the lives of his "characters" as each in turn becomes a major player in the space program. After an opening chapter on the terror of being a test pilot's wife, the story cuts back to the late 1940s, when Americans were first attempting to break the sound barrier. Test pilots, we discover, are people who live fast lives with dangerous machines, not all of them airborne. Chuck Yeager was certainly among the fastest, and his determination to push through Mach 1--a feat that some had predicted would cause the destruction of any aircraft--makes him the book's guiding spirit.

Yet soon the focus shifts to the seven initial astronauts. Wolfe traces Alan Shepard's suborbital flight and Gus Grissom's embarrassing panic on the high seas (making the controversial claim that Grissom flooded his Liberty capsule by blowing the escape hatch too soon). The author also produces an admiring portrait of John Glenn's apple-pie heroism and selfless dedication. By the time Wolfe concludes with a return to Yeager and his late-career exploits, the narrative's epic proportions and literary merits are secure. Certainly The Right Stuff is the best, the funniest, and the most vivid book ever written about America's manned space program. --Patrick O'Kelley

Review

"An exhilarating flight into fear, love, beauty and fiery death ... magnificent."-- "People "It is Tom Wolfe at his very best ... technically accurate, learned, cheeky, risky, touching, tough, compassionate, nostalgic, worshipful, jingoistic -- The Right Stuff is superb." -- "The New York Times Book Review "Breathtaking ... epic ... There are images and ideas in The Right Stuff that glisten like a rocket screaming to the heavens." -- "Los Angeles Times "Romantic and thrilling ... One of the most romantic and thrilling books ever written about men who put themselves in peril." -- "The Boston Globe "It's magic ... the best book I have read in the last ten years."-- "Chicago Tribune Also by Tom Wolfe: The Bonfire of the VanitiesThe Electric Kool-Aid Acid TestFrom Bauhaus to Our HouseThe Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline BabyThe Painted WordThe Right StuffMauve Gloves & MadmenClutter & VineIn Our TimeThe Pumphouse GangRadical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers Available wherever Bantam Books are sold

Product Details

  • File Size: 1013 KB
  • Print Length: 369 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 2 edition (May 16, 2004)
  • Publication Date: May 16, 2004
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00139XSBA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,605 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
In the early '80s, I was to graduate from school and got interested in flying for the US Navy. My mother sent a copy of T. Wolfe's book hoping to sway my dangerous intent and take a 'real' job. WRONG. About 9 months later I was soloing over Corpus Christi Bay and on my way to flying Navy jets.
Wolfe has written an epic that spans from the early days of flight test through the beginning of the US manned space program. It will increase the heart rate of aviators, aviation buffs and armchair pilots/astornauts. I highly recommend that anyone remotely interested in aviation/space read this book. While it may not be accurate to the smallest detail, the overall scope and feel for a era gone by can never be or has ever been captured in the history books.
Regarding Gus Grissom, new facts are coming to light that will clear his reputation. Wolfe does hammer Gus in the book about what was known at the time Wolfe wrote "The Right Stuff". However, all the research and reading that I have done, Gus was probably the smartest engineer and best test pilot of the M-7 astronauts . He had a reputation of being a real nuts and bolts engineer and a hard nose pilot. He could handle any situation while flying experitmental aircraft or on the ground discussing craft/engine design with NASA's engineers. If any one has ever seen the old NASA films of the Apollo program, when Gus is doing the radio tests on that fateful day, he really gives the engineers hell from the capsule owing to poor communication on the radios "Jesus Christ, we can't talk between three building, how the hell are we going to talk on the moon." Classic Gus.
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An Amazon.com official commented on the review below
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've owned "The Right Stuff" for over thirty years in print form. I downloaded the Kindle version from Amazon to take with me on business trips.

To my disgust, the Kindle edition is abysmal - clearly, Amazon or whoever came up with it ran the print edition through a character-recognition software program and utterly failed to copy-edit it afterwards. The number of errors is alarming, and it is only because I've read the print version so many times that I was able to recognize what some of the errors meant in the text.

It's a shame, because this book is a fine, fine book and one of my all-time favorites. Shame on Amazon or the publisher or both for charging $10.00 for a flawed, poorly-edited copy.
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An Amazon.com official commented on this review(What's this?)
The typos have been fixed by the publisher and the corrected content is now available.
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great book, completely flubbed by Amazon. Is it so hard to run a spell check on a Kindle manuscript before publishing it? This book is filled with ridiculous OCR screwups: letters cl being turned into a nonsensical d, for instance. And there are a lot of them. Amazon needs to fix this book and send us all an updated version that doesn't hurt our eyes or our brains.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First, ignore the first rating in the Amazon Kindle review. While the Kindle version may well have had problems when first published on Kindle, they have been corrected. That review kept me from reading the Kindle edition of this book for a couple of years. Finally, I decided to try it, and found no mistakes. So, buy it and read it. You will be very happy that you did! I first read this book 30+ years ago and loved it then. Recently, I read The Astronauts Wives Club, another excellent book. This book was the first behind the scenes book to really get the feeling of the brave men (no women astronauts in the Mercury Program), and the test pilots who flew the supersonic jets before them. Prior to this, we basically got the sanitized "official" stories of a group of Boy Scouts. I've read that the Astronauts loved Tom Wolfe's book, but hated the movie. Well, the book is great. I'd also read the Astronauts Wives Club to see the entire story from the wives' point of view.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tom Wolfe gives a brilliantly entertaining and inspirational book about one of the most colorful chapters in recent American history -- the years from the first supersonic piloted test flight up to the early Sixties, when astronauts completed the beginning of America's space program. Wolfe writes about "the right stuff--" a blend of correct judgment, coolness, and the ability to get the job done no matter what the danger. Wolfe rarely depends on technical stuff, so the book will appeal to those who know or care little about aviation or space, and there's little to deter the squeamish, either. The author shows the period's bright side (the accomplishments in spite of the danger, the dopamine-flowing release after a job well-done, the intense exhilaration of it all) , and the dark side (the fears of the families, the tragic deaths from minor lapses in luck or judgment, the tedious egomania of many involved in the programs).
This book epitomizes the bright and dark side of Wolfe's school of writing, too. Above all, Wolfe can be as riveting and as entertaining as you'll find -- "truth can be funnier than fiction." I have heard how Wolfe caught the essence of what someone wanted to say even better than the one who said it, and he sure puts you into the thick of the action. The author gives a legitimate and interesting perspective. Nevertheless, this style plays heavily on your emotions, with all the problems that can involve, and the book is not terribly objective -- a purely entertaining incident can assume more importance than it should.
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