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on April 23, 2014
Luttwak explains that the "highest echelon" of the U.S. Treasury "is staffed almost entirely by former or future employees of the leading financial firms" that are sensitive to Chinese enterprises as future clients, for example Timothy Franz Geithner. According to Luttwak, these financial power elites have no responsibility for or indeed any intellectual interest in the condition of the U.S. manufacturing sector and the subsequent loss of jobs, which they regarded as "uncompetitive and not worth having" — and their willingness to bend to Chinese demands for the sake of making cheap capital available to private finance, has also allowed a tsunami of technology, including aerospace technology, innovated by American enterprise to be given to the Chinese.

Every American should read this book! This man is brilliant and he knows what most do not or will not say. We have much to learn.
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on January 20, 2016
Lovely little book. Reads well and the argument is presented in a simple manner connecting the dots in current affairs.
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on May 13, 2014
An excellent book that demistfy many topical aspects of the rise of China. As Luttwak shows, things are much more complex that they appear
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on August 24, 2015
I think it is good.
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on March 15, 2014
This remarkable book is yet another in the long series of studies on strategy by the author. It should be read by military leaders, economic strategists, politicians, historians, and anyone interested in the rise of China and its opportunities and threats for the West and for its neighbors and East Asia. One of the most enduring and interesting ideas in this book concerns the logic of strategy and the amazing paradoxes that it reveals.
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on June 25, 2013
A good book packed with some great insights. Nevertheless, the whole "logic of strategy" felt like a simplified version of traditional realism. The author believes, rightly so, that the international system is conservative and will impose some restrictions on China's rise, but the theory backing the message is not very sofisticated or comprehensive. To sum up, it is a good book but you can spend your time with better ones, like "china goes global" .
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on August 10, 2013
This is a very interesting short book which erases many myths about China's certain path to the coveted position of the top global superpower status. It's the author's view that "because of China's inherent magnitude, quite independently of its conduct on the regional and international scene, the very rapid growth in its economic capacity and military investment must evoke adversarial reactions, in accordance with the logic of strategy. Other things being equal, when a state of China's magnitude pursues rapid military growth, unless the resulting shift in the power-balance passes the culminating point of resistance inducing the acceptance of some form of subjection, it causes a general realignment of forces against it, as former allies retreat into a watchful neutrality, former neutrals become adversaries, and adversaries old and new coalesce in formal or infornal alliances against the excessively risen power". This is a main theme of the book and very well presented with historical examples, numbers and facts.

I really enjoyed also three other points: 1) the historical parallel of today's China's rise with the rise of imperial Germany in the two decades after 1890, 2) the analysis of China's "great-state autism" with a very funny explanation of the numerous foreign visitors that Chinese have in Beijing and load them with expenxive gifts, and 3) the "strategic unwisdom of the ancients" and why Chinese's stubborn faith in the superior strategic wisdom to be found in ancient texts (like Sun Tzu's "Art of War") and the resulting belief that China will always be able to outmaneuver its adversaries with clever expendients is ridiculously wrong misconception because the ancient writers had in mind intracultural and NOT intercultural foreing relations and military ethics.
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on January 28, 2014
Luttwak's analysis is incise and his supporting evidence is comprehensive. He makes clears the danger China's leadership is creating by its chosen path.
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on October 2, 2013
It helps if you've already read "Strategy", by Luttwak - but that's a difficult book. It might be better to simply look up "luttwak master class" on Youtube, to get some background before proceeding to this otherwise easy book.

Every other book has been about "wow, they've got Ancient Oriental Wisdom". We often hear the rehashing of Zhou Enlai's bon mot about it being "too early to tell" the effects of the French Revolution. This is the only book I've read that sees the Chinese as they are.

Read it.
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on February 23, 2013
Luttwak has written some brilliant stuff over the years but this is not one of those books. he makes a basic argument -- that china's rise will drive the region and states around the world to seek to balance beijing's expanding power -- and then spends the rest of the book making the same point over and over. Luttwak is not a China expert -- which he freely admits up front -- but that doesn't stop him from analyzing in detail the behavior of Chinese leaders, China's military, and its economy. unfortunately, he just gets a lot of the China analysis wrong.
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