Kindle Price: $2.99

Save $11.96 (80%)

Read this title for free. Learn more
Read for Free
with Kindle Unlimited
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The River of Corn: Conquistadors Clash with Native Americans by [Putnam, John Rose]
Kindle App Ad

The River of Corn: Conquistadors Clash with Native Americans Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$2.99

Length: 220 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Daily Deals
Kindle Delivers: Daily Deals
Subscribe to find out about each day's Kindle Daily Deals for adults and young readers. Learn more (U.S. customers only)
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John came west as a young man and settled in Berkeley where he graduated from the University of California. He still lives and writes there. John's characters are so real they'll jump right off the page and talk to you. His villains have hearts as cold as midnight and his heroes almost always do the right thing in the end. While his first novel, HANGTOWN CREEK, a story of adventure, romance, and coming of age in the early days of the gold rush, was published in 2011, his second book, INTO THE FACE OF THE DEVIL, moves between Hangtown and the sawmill where James Marshall first found gold, and pits a young man in love for the first time against a killer so evil he could pass for Satan. Now John has turned his attention to a powerful Native Indian nation led by a beautiful woman and first contacted by Hernando de Soto in 1540. While all trace of their culture has vanished, John fashioned his own ideas about their fate into a gripping and intense new book called THE RIVER OF CORN. Who were the Chicora. What happened to them?

Product Details

  • File Size: 1554 KB
  • Print Length: 220 pages
  • Publication Date: October 25, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00OWQ7UN8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #296,662 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Gomez is in the army and as a black man a bit of a standout. Perico is a translator of Indian language and the two team up to help to find Chicora the fabled city of gold. John Putnam takes the reader on a journey back in time as he tells of a history from ages ago, but one that should never be forgotten. Because greed is a constant no matter the year and leads to terrible tragedies as it does in this well written novel. The reader will feel they are back in time as they go with Gomez and Perico on their great and dangerous adventure. This is a wonderful book that combines believable history with the author's wonderful abilities as a story teller and a must have read.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In 1540-41, Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto led an expedition of soldiers through what is currently the US south from Florida and the Carolinas to the Mississippi River near Arkansas, running roughshod through Native American tribes in his search for gold. However, de Soto never survived this final expedition and there is still debate and uncertainty as to the path and details of his exploits and interactions with these tribes. Putnam's novel is a fictional imagining of de Soto's meeting and attempt at strong-arming the Chicora tribe for treasure, mostly through the eyes of an African slave who has become adept at translating the tribal languages for his Spanish masters. However, Gomez, the slave, realizes that his conversations with the Chicora queen may be a path to his own freedom. This was a very imaginative tale that felt extremely historically realistic for the time and location. It encouraged me to research the expedition and the tribes in the story. However, the story's descriptions of the environs seemed to place the events around the Mississippi River and the edge of the Great Plains, while my research seemed to place the Chicora and their enemy tribe, the Chalaque (more commonly known as the Cherokee) in Georgia and the Carolinas. Still, since no modern place names were ever used, I have no proof for my doubts and must wind up enjoying a very interesting and engaging piece of historical fiction.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first discovered John Putnam's work through his vivid portrayals of the characters and events of the California Gold Rush. In "The River of Corn," he changes gears and plunges his readers headlong into the earliest days of the exploration - and exploitation of the New World.
The records of Hernan Desoto's explorations are sketchy, most of them lost to history. Of course, even if they were available today, a scholar would probably find them typically self-serving and one sided. Mr. Putnam employs his considerable storytelling skills to fill in the gaps with logical speculation, resulting in an amazing reading experience, told from the viewpoints of both historical and fictitious characters.
"The River of Corn" is a riveting story of adventure, hardship, greed, and destruction of civilizations. It's a rattling good read, whether one is a lover of history, or simply a fan of well told adventure stories. This reviewer eagerly awaits John Putnam's next effort.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although this is a novel it is, as far as I can tell, based on what could possibly have happened when the Spanish came to the shores of the New World looking for gold. They brought with them deceit, cruelty and could not have cared less about anyone--all they wanted was gold. This is the story of how the Chicora out smarted the Spanish with the help of a Moorish slave. It is a brilliant tale told in a way that will grip you and not let go. You will cheer for the Chicora as they not only outwit the Spanish but also their arch enemies.

Both history buffs and suspense readers alike will love this book!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
River of Corn is a brilliant historic fiction account of the interaction of the native Americans and the Spanish conquistadors. John Rose Putnam weaves the story such that you are not sure where it is happening but just always suspect. It vividly introduces the Spanish Conquistadors to the native North Americans and relates the invader's arrogance as well as their cruelty. Surprisingly, this is a love story, which is refreshing to say the least. John's writing is fluid and remarkably without the little errors and typos that often disturb many readers. Read this book, you will be glad you did.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a history major and author, I can attest to the fact that John Putnam's book is based on a viable historical concept. Hernan de Soto, also seeking the Fountain of Youth as well as rumored gold, traveled with his army through Florida and up into the various Southeast states of America as early as 1540. He reached as far north and west as Hot Springs, Arkansas before giving up and returning to Spain. In the process, he encountered many native tribes, most of which no longer exist. He brought disease with him, perhaps willfully, perhaps not; but in the end hundreds of thousands of people died. Putnam puts this all together in a believable narrative complete with fictional native cultures and interactions. He has picked historical events and inserted them into the story quite well. In all, I see it as a worthy work of historical fiction that all should consider. History is not all the rage today, but it should be, and when a writer puts it in a great fictional narrative like The River of Corn, he is doing the country a great favor.

It is interesting that de Soto was seeking gold and did not find it. It is a good thing, for when it was finally found in Georgia on the lands of the Cherokee and the Choctaw, they were removed to Oklahoma on the orders of President Jackson. The act was against the law, a solemn ratified treaty, and a Supreme Court decision. In the end, it caused the deaths of many thousands of Indians and has now become known as the "Trail of Tears." It was one of the many horrible acts by the U.S. government against the natives, and demonstrated the power of gold to corrupt everyone. It was not the end of the story, however.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The River of Corn: Conquistadors Clash with Native Americans
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The River of Corn: Conquistadors Clash with Native Americans