The Road: Stories, Journalism, and Essays (New York Review Books Classics) Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews
:
:
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Kindle App Ad
Buy
$10.99
eBook features:
Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Price set by seller.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Price
New from Used from
Kindle, September 28, 2010
"Please retry"
$10.99
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.00

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Grossman's unsparing, literary account of the horrific ways Nazi Germany implemented its ethnic-cleansing program at Treblinka was one of the first reports of a death camp anywhere in Europe and eventually provided prosecutors at the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal with crucial background information. The surprise is that up until now and English-language translation of Grossman's lengthy article has never been published in its entirety. That will soon change with the publication of The Road, a collection of Grossman's best short stories and war-time articles, including 'The Hell of Treblinka.'" --Tobias Grey, The Wall Street Journal

“…the collection is a treasure trove that lends the reader an insider's understanding of what it was like to live through the Soviet era, at the same time as it introduces us to Grossman's enduring preoccupation with the wonder and terror of humanity.…A wonderful collection, this – an introduction to the man and his times that also tells us much about his love, his pity and his faith.” —Gillian Slovo, The Guardian

“Grossman’s work excavates from the Soviet rubble vital artifacts of the bitter, the tragic, the self-sacrificing, the indomitable and, ultimately, the inspiring….. [The Road is] a volume that is sensitive to Grossman’s often lyrical language and frames each entry within its time through comprehensive notes.” —Ken Kalfus, The New York Times
 
“[Grossman’s] report ‘The Hell of Treblinka’ was one of the first to report on an extermination camp, and was used as testimony in the Nuremberg trials. ‘Treblinka” is included in the recently published book, The Road — an original collection of Grossman’s short stories, essays, and letters translated into English for the first time…. This collection serves as a fantastic vie...

Review

'Readers familiar with his novels will be surprised by his short fiction. They show a writer of infinite variety' Victor Sebestyen, The Sunday Times. 'No one knew better than Grossman what people are capable of. These stories and essays are one of the cultural monuments of the 20th century' David Herman, New Statesman. 'The unstinting championing of ordinary human emotion is what strikes hardest in Grossman's style ... Grossman manages to find human simplicity in his characters at the very apex of pain and disaster' Daily Telegraph. 'This collection of short fiction and essays from the remarkable and criminally under-read Soviet writer includes haunting short stories and his excoriating wartime expose of the Treblinka death camp' Benjamin Evans, Sunday Telegraph. 'Grossman's stories are so affecting partly because they look so unflinchingly at human nature, combining a journalist's eye with a fascination for humanity enduring under near-intolerable circumstances.' Metro. 'The only subject and the only hope is humanity' Brian Morton, Scottish Sunday Herald. 'Grossman deserves a special, if not revered, place as a recorder of some of the worst excesses of the 20th century - indeed, of any century. A casual reader may be lured into thinking this to be a collection of fictional short stories depicting the hardships and privations of Soviet life. But on page 126 comes an abrupt and horrifying awakening ... 'The Hell of Treblinka' ... nothing prepares us for the force of Grossman's description; his detailed, harrowing reconstruction of what happened' Scotsman. 'Grossman's trajectory is clear in his short fiction and essays: early essays explore the ardent patriotism that fired Russia; later ones such as the title story, 'The Road', an allegory of a beaten mule pulling a munitions train that offers a bitter reflection on life, hint at dangerous disillusionment ... The Road is an excellent introduction to Grossman's hauntingly powerful fiction and reportage' James Urquhart, Financial Times. 'a richness and clarity to a fascinating period and define Grossman as one of the great literary figures of the last century' Good Book Guide. 'This superbly edited compendium of his writing, containing short stories, journalism and letters to his dead mother, allows us to access the nature and success of his enterprise. Through its lucid notes and essays it also serves as a first-class companion to the terrible history of mid-20th-century central Europe.' Jewish Chronicle. '...his vivid dispatches, some newly translated for this superb collection, retain a freshness that only the finest journalism can. The 11 short stories also collected here show a writer of infinite variety, and the bulk of them will enhance his reputation ... his is a powerful voice of conscience' Sunday Times. 'The collection has humour, pathos, satire and tragedy. Grossman's superlative ability is to relay through sparse writing the fear, anxiety and compassion of those he writes of. This is an utterly absorbing, compassionate and necessary collection and once read will linger and cause true reflection, as the best writing ought.' Journal of the Law Society of Scotland. '... it has become accepted that Vasily Grossman was one of the giants of 20th Century literature. This anthology of his stories and journalism, brilliantly translated by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler, charts his growing disillusionment with communism as well as his frontline role in the war against the Nazis' Mail on Sunday. 'For today's reader, Grossman's work excavates from the Soviet rubble vital artefacts of the bitter, the tragic, the self-sacrificing, the indomitable and, ultimately, the inspiring' Ken Kalfus, International Herald Tribune. 'The mystery of how to improve the human condition continued to fascinate him and is profoundly reflected in Grossman's superb writings - an enduring memorial to the man' Geoffrey Goodman, Tribune. 'From satire to comedy and tragedy this is a fantastic collection translated into English for the first time. Including Stalin's purges and the Holocaust, these short stories and articles are accompanied by introductions that put Grossman's life into context' Daily Express. '...his vivid dispatches, some newly translated for this superb collection, retain a freshness that only the finest journalism can. The 11 short stories also collected here show a writer of infinite variety, and the bulk of them will enhance his reputation ... his is a powerful voice of conscience' Sunday Times.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1310 KB
  • Print Length: 386 pages
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics (September 28, 2010)
  • Publication Date: September 28, 2010
  • Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003WUYORA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #798,256 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Penelope V. Burt on September 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
Why is Vasily Grossman such a powerful writer? He is a realist, he is sincere, low-key, at times even stolid. His prose can be skillful, it can sometimes attain a startling lyricism, but he is no brilliant stylist, nor is he a revolutionary original like his friend Andrey Platonov. You could say that the power comes from the content (he is, after all, plunging us into the midst of war, genocide, and terror, even when he tells it slant), but this can't be the whole story. Grossman, it seems to me, just has a respect and love for the "mystery of the human soul" - and the animal soul as well: see the title story about a mule at Stalingrad. He is also disconcertingly good at portraying self-deception, as well as maternal love.
This is the third volume of Grossman's work that we owe to Robert Chandler and his various associates (the others are Life and Fate (New York Review Books Classics) and Everything Flows (New York Review Books Classics). All of them are great, although I really think he excels at the story form: in the novels he can sometimes press a little hard on the reader. So if you haven't read Grossman before, I would certainly recommend this as the first thing to read. If you have read him, you don't need my recommendation to get this book!
Read more ›
1 Comment 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Christina Georgina Rossetti.

Every now and again I come across a passage in a book that I immediately perceive to be the `emotional core' of the book. In the case of "The Road", a collection of stories and other writings by Vasily Grossman, I came across a passage that I thought served not as the `core' of the book but, rather, one that, instead, placed a bookmark on the beginning of the road that Grossman travelled as a writer and as a man.

The passage is found in "The Hell of Treblinka". Grossman, who was likely the first reporter to view and write about the horrors of the Nazi death camps, wrote this piece shortly after the liberation of Treblinka. It is a stunning piece of writing. Toward the end of the article, Grossman tries to make sense of things. He asks: "A particular kind of State does not appear out of nowhere. What engenders a particular regime is the material and ideological relations existing among a country's citizens. It is to these material and ideological relations that we need to devote serious thought; the nature of these relations is what should appall us."

When Grossman wrote this article, in September 1944 it was clear that his focus was solely on the Nazi death machine and the active and passive acceptance of that regime by Germany's own citizens. But, by the end of his life Grossman's focus evolved. In "The Hell of Treblinka" he looked at the material and ideological relations existing amongst the citizens of other countries, specifically Germany. By the time he wrote
...Read more ›
4 Comments 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The Road, by Vasily Grossman, is a collection of short stories written by one of the most celebrated Russian authors of the 20th century. Grossman was a journalist embedded with the Red Army during World War II, who later became something of a Soviet dissident and whose master work, Life and Fate, examined the harsh repression of Soviet Communism through the prism of the siege of Stalingrad.

Some of the stories simply touch upon the simplicity of Russian life in the first half of the 20th century, while others deal with the mindless stupidity and soul grinding nature of the Soviet bureaucracy. Some, however, written during the "Great War", have as their primary focus the nature of the German war machine and its actions as it subjugated the Polish, Ukrainian and Russian countryside prior to the Battle of Stalingrad.

In explaining the German hierarchy of oppression in one such Ukrainian village, one character in the short story, The Old Teacher, says:

"Well it seems to me that the sufferings of the Russians and Ukrainians are so great that the time has come to demonstrate that there is a fate still more awful, still more terrible. The Germans will say, `Don't grumble! Be happy and proud, be glad that you are not Jews! It's not a matter of elemental hatred. It's simple arithmetic- the simple arithmetic of brutality."

In The Hell of Treblinka, Grossman sets out the single best description and explanation for what happened in a Nazi concentration camp that I have ever encountered. He does so by providing examples, examples of what occurred to the hundreds of thousands of men, women and children condemned to an experience so utterly horrifying as to defy imagination.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Road: Stories, Journalism, and Essays (New York Review Books Classics)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Road: Stories, Journalism, and Essays (New York Review Books Classics)


Look for Similar Items by Category