Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Rome at War: Farms, Families and Death in the Middle Republic (Studies in the History of Greece and Rome) First Edition Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807828397
ISBN-10: 0807828394
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
More Buying Choices
7 New from $104.67 18 Used from $46.49
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Save up to 40% during Wiley's Summer Savings Event. Learn more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Represents a much needed re-evaluation of the impact of Roman warfare on agriculture and the Roman 'peasant class' during the third and second centuries B.C." -- "Journal of Roman Studies"

Review

Radical and thought-provoking.--Scholia Reviews



This is a fine book. Rosenstein brings a welcome new approach to the difficult question of how war and agriculture, two of the most prevalent practices of the ancient Roman world, interacted. . . . Salubrious and compelling.--Bryn Mawr Classical Review



Represents a much needed re-evaluation of the impact of Roman warfare on agriculture and the Roman 'peasant class' during the third and second centuries B.C.--Journal of Roman Studies



Rosenstein offers a radically new interpretation of the impact of military service on the peasant economy. Its stimulating insights and sophisticated modelling make this work a major contribution to the debate on one of the most crucial issues of Roman Republican history.--John Rich, University of Nottingham



Contributes greatly to our understanding of one of the more important issues in Republican history.--Historian



In this important new book, Nathen Rosenstein offers a comprehensive challenge to the traditional historiographical explanation of the economic and political crisis in the Gracchan era. . . . Well-written and accessible. . . . [Rome at War: Farms, Families, and Death in the Middle Republic] should inspire debate and discussion on one of the most important problems in Roman history.--New England Classical Journal



An important book, packed with big ideas. . . . Challenges many long-held assumptions. . . . A ground-breaking book, which deserves to be read carefully by anyone who is interested in the history of the middle Republic.--International Journal of the Classical Tradition

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Studies in the History of Greece and Rome
  • Hardcover: 339 pages
  • Publisher: University of North Carolina Press; First Edition edition (December 31, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807828394
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807828397
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,146,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Newton Ooi on November 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The home front is always one of the less popular subjects of war histories. Not as heroic, bloody or grand, but just as important, the way families handle the pressures of war economically, politically and socially is often as important in determining the outcome of a war as does battlefield bravery and brinksmanship. This book goes one step deeper and examines how birth rates and death rates in the Italian countryside affected the ability of the nation to war with its neighbors.

Previous accounts of the Roman Empire have viewed Rome's territorial growth in the following lens. Roman armies took men of their farms for service in foreign quarters. This led to untended farms that needed labor. Subsequently, Rome was more willing than many of its neighbors to take men of their farms for military service. This gave Rome a manpower advantage on the battlefield, and Rome's military conquests were used to supply slaves and refugee labor to work its own farms.

This book turns this argument on its head by introducing another factor; high birthrates. The conscription of some portion of Roman men into the armies was compensated by high birthrates which proved enough people on the farms to keep them fully functional. Therefore, Roman farms had enough labor to feed its armies year-round, and its armies were fully manned to fight year round. But this process survived as long as Roman soldiers were constantly marching outwards to conquer new lands, and lose some of its men in the process. Eventually, enough kingdoms bowed willingly to Roman rule without minimal bloodshed that overpopulation became the problem.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
If you're an expert on the Roman empire you will probably appreciate the fact that Rosenstein gets right to the heart of his subject with no unnecessary explanations. If you're not an expert, he doesn't make it easy to read this book. For example, he doesn't give us many dates, assuming we know when the Punic Wars ended and Sulla and Tiberius ruled Rome. (My level of expertise is that I can guess within about 20 years when these events occured.) Background and context in this book are minimized.

The subject is interesting. What impact did the frequent Roman wars between about 200 and 50 BC have on Roman agriculture? Was there an increase in the number of slaves and large landowners? Were small farms impoverished during this period as a result of Roman wars. How many Roman soldiers died in war? In 190 pages of related essays and 150 pages of appendices, notes, and a vast bibliography the author takes on these subjects. Whew! It was all a bit much. I need a little more background, more of a concession to my ignorance. Suffice it to say that this is not a book for the casual reader.

If you are an expert, however, you will probably find Rosenstein's exhaustive arguments and questioning of the conventional wisdom to be stimulating. Essentially, the author finds that the growth of slavery and the the destruction of the small landowners of Rome was less important during this period than believed by previous scholars. Along the way are some interesting facts such as (Table 2) a list of Roman battles and battle deaths between 200 and 168 BC. If that sounds like your cup of tea read this book.

Smallchief
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Nathan Rosenstein offers up a well researched view of how ancient Rome mustered and operated its army. The basic starting point is what we have been taught about this time period: Rome would muster armies from its farms and wage war coincident with agrarian cycles. Through various pieces of evidence, Rosenstein argues that this long-held view was not likely the case and that a standing army would have been the more likely. His arguments consider a wide array of data points, and he states his case convincingly.

Though written as an academic work, the book is well written and reasonably easy to follow. Anyone who has a sincere interest in ancient history, and particularly that of Rome, will likely find this book interesting, but the reader who likes good research will enjoy it more. More interestingly for me was the fact that the book takes apart long-held points of view and dissects them methodically -- a good model for anyone who wants to read how research is done well and presented.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book has taken the majority of preconceived notions about the time of the Hannibalic War in Rome and it's affects on the Italian peasantry and turned them on their head. The agrarian crisis which was addressed during the Tribunate of Tiberius Gracchus was always explained as a by product of the turbulent Hannibalic War and the adverse effects the citizenry of the Italian peninsula suffered during these times. However, Nathan Rosenstein, using every single piece of evidence available to him, from the ancient sources to archaeology, genetic testing to demographic studies, shows that not only would the Italian people have been able to generally deal with their current conditions but that their population as a whole was skyrocketing. This, he argues, was the reason for the agrarian crisis, not a large rise in slave staffed estates(which he shows, by ancient evidence that the number of slaves was much lower than generally thought, and the near total lack of archaeological remains of large estates from that time period, never reached the number historians have traditionally believed.). This book has made me look at this time period in a completely different light. I hope Mr. Rosenstein continues to put out books if their quality and research is even half as high as this work.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse