Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Rules For Revolutionaries 1st Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 81 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0887309960
ISBN-10: 0887309968
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$4.19
Condition: Used - Good
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Support Your Planet. Buy CLEAN EARTH BOOKS. Shipping orders swiftly since 2008. A great value for the avid reader! GOOD can range from a well cared for book in great condition to average with signs of slight wear. Overall, All text in great shape! Comes with our 100% Money Back Guarantee. Our customer service can't be beat! Tracking included on all orders.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
125 Used from $0.01
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
More Buying Choices
28 New from $2.06 125 Used from $0.01 18 Collectible from $4.95
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Guy Kawasaki, former chief evangelist at Apple Computer and an iconoclastic corporate tactician who now works with high-tech startups in Silicon Valley, is back in print with his seventh book: Rules for Revolutionaries: The Capitalist Manifesto for Creating and Marketing New Products and Services. Entertainingly written in collaboration with previous coauthor Michele Moreno, it lays out Kawasaki's decidedly audacious (but personally experienced) strategies for besting the competition and triumphing in today's hypercharged business environment. The book is divided into three sections, whose titles alone epitomize its thrust and tone. The first, "Create Like a God," discusses the way that radical new products and services must really be developed. The second, "Command Like a King," explains why take-charge leaders are truly necessary in order for such developments to succeed. And the third, "Work Like a Slave," focuses on the commitment that is actually required to beat the odds and change the world. A concluding section is filled with entertaining and inspirational quotes on topics like technology, transportation, politics, entertainment, and medicine that show how even some of our era's most successful ideas and people--the telephone, Louis Pasteur, and Yahoo! among them--have prevailed despite the scoffing of naysayers. --Howard Rothman

From Publishers Weekly

If music (Big Yellow Taxi) and television (That '70s Show) can look to the 1970s as a source of current inspiration, why not business books? That's the implicit argument of Forbes columnist Kawasaki's (How to Drive Your Competition Crazy) new book, which tries to capture the attitude of Apple Computer some two decades ago, when its goal was to make "insanely great products." This tone doesn't occur by accident. Kawasaki was director of product development at Apple. To his credit, Kawasaki, who now runs garage.com, a Silicon Valley venture capital firm, succeeds in being inspirational as he lays out his three steps to success: "Create Like a God," "Command Like a King" and "Work Like a Slave." Each section is filled with dozens of ideas about how to approach a market differently, and he gives pithy examples of how firms ranging from bicycle companies to Internet enterprises applied one of the three steps on their way to market. But while long on inspiration, Kawasaki is short on "how to." He has sprinkled the book with "exercises," but they are primarily there for comic relief, rather than instruction (e.g., "The next time a telemarketer calls you at home, ask for his phone number and tell him you will call him back that night"). Ultimately, however, these shortfalls probably don't matter. Kawasaki gives entrepreneurs and team leaders battling entrenched corporate bureaucracies more reason to keep up the fight. It is very hard not to like a book whose major theme is "don't let Bozosity grind you down."
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; 1st edition (January 6, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887309968
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887309960
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,311,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Guy has always done an excellent job of collecting information and dispersing it in an entertaining and educational way. His latest book is no exception. What makes Guy's books useful is that they are not filled with extra stuff. In other words, he presents just the facts, in as few words as possible. You don't have to read two pages to figure out the point he's trying to get across. Reader's of his other works will recognize some familiar themes such as how to treat the customer. As an added bonus, Guy presents "required" reading at the end of each chapter -- a wonderful collection of other works that are relevant to the topics discussed. And while the book uses the software industry as frequent examples, it is really for every business, high tech, low tech, no tech. Highly recommended reading.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
It doesn't matter if you're already on the barricades or just a Walter Mitty dreaming of turning your garage into a factory, you'll want to read this book. Actually, you'll need to read this book. It tells you how "create like a god, command like a king, and work like a slave" (no, Kawasaki didn't write that himself but he was smart enough to quote one of the best: Brancusi). Better than telling you though, Kawasaki shows you with plenty of examples for each stage of this process. And unlike a lot of the business books I read, this is not just a book about marketing, product development, etc., etc. Kawasaki relates each stage of this 3-step process to a broad audience and always shows the important principles behind each. For once, I can honestly say that the subtitle of a business book is truthful (a manifesto for creating and marketing new products and services). In fact, it may even be a bit limited. I've gleaned information from here that I've found very useful just for the everday business of living.
This is definitely on the top shelf of my library.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I guess I am one of the few who didn't like this book, but I found it to be mind numbingly obvious. Guy tells us to do things like "look for new ways to use an existing product" or "look for powerlessness" (i.e. unfulfilled needs - gee, who would guess that filling needs would lead to business success)... Well, DUH! He gives very specific examples that worked in one industry but might not work in another, and almost expects the reader to take them as fact and try them - very dangerous for someone blindly following his ideas, rather then figuring out their own given their situation.
Just because GE used to have their engineers work on an unsolveable problem and it paid off by accident (development of a light bulb coating), Guy never talks about the flip side - how many engineering hours were spent needlessly? If the engineers collaborated, they might actually have solved the problem many hundreds or thousands of man hours earlier... but Guy never mentions that.
I also notice that Guy gives you about 50 different 'pointers' during a single chapter, and no mortal person could possibly remember and follow them all - and they are mostly blindingly obvious that they should be second nature to any good manager/entrepreneur/visionary.
I thought this book was going to offer a methodical, thoughful way to bring about new ideas and change, but unfortunately it was just a collection of one-line brain farts, common knowledge methods for innovation and bad advice.
I guess the non-revolutionary minded might find this book enlightening. Real revolutionaries will find it incredibly boring. Maybe that's why Apple did so terribly badly the last few years - people like Guy sending them to hell in a handbasket? Sorry for the bad review, Guy, but you need to OFFER SOMETHING in your book, not just fill it with a million examples of what one company did to innovate.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Excellent book! Very simply written and easy to read, yet brilliantly points out the seemingly simple, but important business rules of marketing a product or a service. Looking forward to read more from this "revolutionary" enterpreneur.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Those who can, do. Those who can't, write bad reviews on Amazon.com.
In this age of brand mis-management and Borg-like consultancy books, Guy gives us an accurate viewpoint of someone who has taken part in one of the most important revolutions of this past century...namely the introduction of the Macintosh computer.
While other business authors get philosophical on the "double helixes" of corporate life-spans, or focus on online entities which no longer exist, Guy gives us current and real-life examples of marketing ideas taking place NOW! I couldn't put the book down; a must read for any passionate small business owner in this increasingly competitive and often confused marketplace.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Came on time, low cost and in great shape. Why pay more for books when you can purchase for below half the price and in great condition. This is my next course at Boston University so I have not read the content as of yet.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
RULES covers much of the same ground as Kawasaki's previous books. He continues to prod and inspire readers to make a difference and not to give in to stale, bureaucratic thinking. I found myself yelling out "right on!" a few times -- for example, when Kawasaki advises us to ignore titles, don't ask customers to do something you wouldn't, and "don't worry, be crappy." The book's subtitle is "the capitalist manifesto" which is appropriate since its value is mostly as a motivational polemic rather than a detailed how-to. RULES is enjoyable and a quick read -- a bit too quick as it doesn't have the novelty or depth of Kawasaki's earlier works. SELLING THE DREAM remains his most arousing book, and although RULES doesn't reach those heights, there's still a valuable message here.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews