Automotive Deals HPCC Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Health, Household and Grocery Back to School Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer CafeSociety CafeSociety CafeSociety  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Segway miniPro

The Ruminant Band

August 30, 2011 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:24
30
2
3:20
30
3
3:45
30
4
3:38
30
5
2:34
30
6
3:33
30
7
4:02
30
8
2:50
30
9
4:45
30
10
3:44
30
11
4:01
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Rudolph Klapper on August 13, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Over the course of a decade, Eric Johnson has lead the Fruit Bats through musical terrain both poppy and experimental, mixing Americana folk with bubbly indie, alt-country with melodic chamber-pop. With their fourth release, The Ruminant Band, Johnson & Co. continue to live up to their reputation as musical blacksmiths and the title itself. A ruminant is a mammal with four stomachs, giving it the ability to digest and re-digest food to extract the maximum amount of nutrients from a single bite, and with The Ruminant Band, the Fruit Bats have again created a record of many disparate angles, Johnson's viewpoint on the past forty years of music chewed and re-chewed into a distinctly Fruit Bats release.

Johnson has always been a hard talent to pin down, but his penchant for combining many different styles into a seamless whole remains intact. It's been four years since the Fruit Bats' last, but those four years (four stomachs, anyone?), which have had Johnson become a member of the Shins and the Fruit Bats fall by the wayside, seem to have only ignited Johnson's creativity further. The Ruminant Band runs the gamut from classic rock `n roll in the Neil Young vein to light summer pop reminiscent of Elephant 6 groups, and while nothing here is mind-blowingly original or particularly revolutionary, it is a fresh, solid collection of intimate alternative.

Opener "Primitive Band" stomps along a `70s rock groove and a completely unfettered solo, while guitars ring and twang like the Allman Brothers on the titular track and the country-fried, fuzzed-out "My Unusual Friend." Johnson's vocals, which call to mind a nasally mix between the Minus 5's Scott McCaughey and Kevin Barnes with a more country bent, stay in a higher register for most of the time here.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Eric Johnson, the singer-song writer and main force behind Fruit Bats has been busy in recent years, touring with the Shins as a touring guitarist and also being involved with Vetiver. But finally, after the excellent 2005 album "Spelled the Bones", and again many personnel changes, his band returns and turns in its 4tuh studio album.

"The Ruminant Band" (11 tracks; 40 min.) continues the free-flowing indie-folk-rock sound of earlier albums, as if time has stood still. The album kicks off with a great "Primitive Man", followed by an equally enticing title track. "Beautiful Morning Light" is a beautiful 'quiet' song, just Eric and his acoustic guitar, and if you wonder where Fleet Foxes got some of their inspiration, look no further. On "The Hobo Sound" you find yourself back into a honky-tonk country bar 100 years ago, and it works great. The up-tempo "My Unusual Friend" features some electric guitars, to spice things up. "Feathered Bed" reminds me of early Neil Young, somehow.

In all, this is a most excellent and long-delayed return of Fruit Bats. At 40 min., this album clips by in no time, and you'll find yourself playing this again and again. I hope to see these guys at some point in concert, and can't wait to see how these songs will resonate in a live setting. Meanwhile, if you wonder where you can hear Fruit Bats, look no further than WOXY (BAM! The Future of Rock and Roll), the internet-only station that brings the best indie-music in the country, bar none. Meanwhile, "The Ruminant Band" is highly recommended!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Not quite as ethereal as the transcendent "Tripper" and cheerier than the countrified "echolocation," "The Ruminant Band" contains sweet, highly infectious, acoustic-based songs that are among the Fruit Bats' best. One after the other, these melodious songs reveal a band hitting its stride in a big way.

As an adjective, "ruminant" means contemplative, meditative. Though "The Ruminant Band" has plenty of tuneful spark, it wouldn't be a Fruit Bats record without poetic, reflective music. Singer-songwriter Eric D. Johnson creates mesmerizing vibes and tones -- even his catchiest, seemingly fun songs have an underlying melancholy that give the compositions added weight.

About halfway through, the barroom piano on "The Hobo Girl" and "Being on Our Own" call to mind "White Album"-era Beatles. Elsewhere, the intimate guitar strums on "Beautiful Morning Light" and "Singing Joy to the World" (which mentions Three Dog Night playing at the fairgrounds) sound like they're being played by your best friend. "The Blessed Breeze," meanwhile, is positively gorgeous, a No. 1 FM radio hit in a perfect world.

Beautiful lyrics, virtuoso electric guitar (including some well-placed slide guitar), heartfelt singing and bouncy piano on several tracks for added kick make "The Ruminant Band" a truly sublime CD worth hearing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I first started listening to Fruit Bats when I heard the title track "Ruminant Band." Fun, great music. They are fabulous live too.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Wonderfully anachronistic, it sounds like a lost great album from the 1970's. A near perfect album front to back and even includes a few guitar solos. Yes, guitar solos in 2009, and they're good! Part of the familiar feel is songs like "Flamingo" that seem to reference the piano sound from Neil Young's "Harvest." Also, a song like "The Ruminant Band" recalls a famous Doobie Brothers guitar lick. And even further, the album includes a more memorable ode to eternally long lost young love, "Singing Joy to The World," which might be placed alongside similar great love songs like Big Star's "Thirteen," Wussy's "Trail of Sadness," and even Bob Seger's "Night Moves." A great record that tastes good on vinyl.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category