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S/He Paperback – March 1, 2005

4.3 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Pratt breaks traditions, restrictions, and taboos in what many--some with shocked horror, others with fascination--will find a high-risk book, almost sure to become one of the hottest this season in and perhaps also outside the lesbian community. In a long series of vignettes, Pratt chronicles her Southern youth, during which she was "trained into the cult of pure white womanhood" and raised to be subjugated by a man; her lengthy marriage, the birth of two sons, and her eventual leave-taking from that traditional role; her coming out, living as a lesbian, and the fear it brought of "a sisterhood based on biological definitions" ; and--at the book's pulsing, erotic core--her passionate love for a woman born female but male in gender expression, who often lives as a man and whom Pratt calls "my husband." Some straights and gays alike may be repulsed by Pratt, finding her neither a "real woman" nor a "real lesbian." Others may applaud her efforts to eradicate boundaries. Whitney Scott --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Minnie Bruce Pratt is the author of We Say We Love Each Other, Rebellion, Crime Against Nature, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt We Ate.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Alyson Books (March 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 155583888X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1555838881
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.3 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,044,535 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Minnie Bruce Pratt is a rare combination of intellect, artfulness, and compassion. I find disturbing the review sited above which claims that some gay and straight readers will find Bruce Pratt "repulsive," that she will be perceived as not "real"--not a "real" lesbian, not a "real" woman. Why is this ridiculousness being perpetuated in what should be a concise, intelligent synopsis/review? I mean, really, does it have to be so banal? I love Minnie Bruce Pratt. She speaks in gorgeous, accomplished poetry the language of the unheard. That, again, is a very rare thing.
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Format: Paperback
Words flutter across the page like doves in flight, painting a picture of love like none I have ever seen before, yet as familiar to me as a lover's morning smile or an evening hug. Having already been moved to tears by Feinberg's *Stone Butch Blues*, Minnie Bruce Pratt was the natural next step toward understanding and awareness that only unfolded more of myself. If all this is new to you, open the door. If you are already a fan, you know what to expect. You won't be disappointed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pratt's language in this book is sometimes painfully raw, as she strips her feelings and experiences bare for the world to read. It is often beautifully poetic and highly quotable. She can come across as tender or intolerant, but always there is strength and affection running through the warp and weave of her story.

I also found the "Some straights and gays alike may be repulsed by Pratt, finding her neither a "real woman" nor a "real lesbian"" of Amazon's Booklist review to be gratuitous, inflammatory, condescending, and repulsive. Gender and sexual identity are highly personal and nuanced, and not subject to external validation.

Recommended reading for:
- Anyone who enjoys poetic prose
- Anyone studying gender dentity or sexual identity
- Anyone who enjoys Dorothy Allison, Leslie Feinberg, or Bear Bergman
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Format: Paperback
And you thought this text was about lovers who traverse gender and sexual dimensions of US culture? Since it's such a rich read, take another look at the revolutionary's socialist political cultural criticism. Minnie Bruce is doing a Lao Tzu impression to achieve a socio-cultural damnation of the US--"doing without doing." With lovers, gorgeous sexual scenes, deep intimacy in the foreground of her tiny "chapters"/stories, my favorite in-between writer is providing an understated socialist feminist critique. It is a genre-crossed book.
Like the soft spoken and appearing Southern lady gone North as she is, Pratt's got a near subliminal "undertext" going on beneath the surface reading of everyday life stories. One of the most delightfully subversive texts I've read of a modern poetic prose writer.
Oh give this one to all cultural and literary criticism students, queer theorists, transgender and gender studies scholars, and the poets, of course.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked this book. The author has had an interesting life. A southern white, femme lesbian attracted to transgender stone butches, she grew up during and participated in, all the civil rights movements of the late twentieth century, black, women's, gay and transgender. With short one to four page vignettes the book moves quickly and is written in a rather "poetic" style (the author is a poet) and I would actually like to read a more conventionally written autobiography fleshed out with more detail. I thought it was interesting that later in life she reunited with several schoolmates and came to find out that many of them were also gay and reminisced about how different their lives could have been if they could have been out with each other, but back in the 60s that just couldn't have happened. I would also like to know more about her mother who is described once as a bulldagger. This book has lots of great slice of life scenes and I didn't want it to end. It was published in 1995, I hope the author writes a "part 2" the brings us up to the present.
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Format: Paperback
I never seem to have a copy of this beautiful book because i am always giving it to people, telling them to just keep it, because i feel like it will enrich their lives. I read this when i was first exploring my femme identity, and i found every piece beautiful, moving, powerful, and transformative. I cried again and again as MBP moved through her journey from young wife to lesbian feminist to femme, to powerful superfemme force to be reckoned with. This book is the only one i have ever read that deals perfectly with the pain and shame and profound sadness and lonliness of growing up filled with a desire that is not recognized in our culture, and is difficult to understand inside ourselves. For a long time i thought of this book as a love letter to Les Feinburg, MBP's partner, but now i read it as a love letter to herself, revealing her growth and strength and wisdom. When i grow up, i wannabe Minnie Bruce Pratt!!
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