Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$0.96
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book has some visible wear on the binding, cover, pages. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

STRANGE ANGELS Hardcover – April 1, 1994

3.8 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.02 $0.96

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Writing with a pretentious, almost adolescent sensibility and a bad case of logorrhea, Koja ( Bad Brains ) whines unremittingly in a single-pitched, overwrought stream of consciousness that will probably alienate most readers. The story concerns out-of-work Pennsylvania photographer Grant Cotto and his narcissistic infatuation with Robin, a certified schizophrenic who is being treated by Cotto's therapist girlfriend. Cotto thinks his own anguished sense of futility will be remedied if he can partake of the startling visions Robin expresses in his artwork, so he embarks on a self-serving plan to wean the deeply troubled patient from doctors, therapists and medication, and to unite with him spiritually in a quest for a new perspective on life. At the high point of his experiments, Cotto becomes convinced that Robin is being transformed into an angel and will soon disclose rare and wonderful insights. When Robin goes totally mad instead and starves himself to death, Cotto's conscience prickles, but his greater sorrow is over having missed the revelations promised by Robin's dementia. Though Koja's premise is interesting enough, her characters are one-dimensional monomaniacs engaged in a disturbingly simple-minded, voyeuristic search for altered states in bona fide pathology.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

A gratuitously bizarre, reader-unfriendly tome by the author of Skin (1993); you can almost see through it, despite the murky prose. Grant Cotto is a photographer with a serious case of artist's block and a lot of time on his hands. When he sees the tortured drawings of Robin, an institutionalized schizophrenic under the care of his art therapist girlfriend, Johanna, the fun begins in earnest. Grant decides to help Robin free his artistic inner self by encouraging his drawing, a talent the author intimates is part of Robin's illness. Naturally, Johanna disapproves of this manipulation of Robin, and after a few heated exchanges, she moves out. Now misguided Grant can enjoy some real destruction. He encourages Robin to leave Clearwater Psychiatric, go off his medication, and move in, so that he may devote himself slavishly to producing drawings of fascinating, twisted beauty. Soon, a strange kind of co-dependency develops, and Grant's interest shifts from the drawings to Robin himself. The two share all kinds of adventures, including experiments with sensory and sleep deprivation and a visit to an Evangelical Pentecostal meeting in order to assuage Robin's growing fixation with angels. At the church, they meet Saskia, also a Clearwater outpatient, and before long they're spending a lot of time at her ``Holiday House,'' so named because she won't take down her Christmas decorations. Of course, an odd triangle develops, but the unmedicated Robin begins to fall apart, starving himself and resisting help from his roomies so that he may die and join the angels. With the exception of a sensitive, if somewhat drawn-out description of Robin's death, Koja portrays her characters as one-dimensional losers. Additionally, the story is laden with what aspires to be foreshadowing--too bad there's so little action to foreshadow. Strange, indeed. -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 277 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Press (April 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385308922
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385308922
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.5 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,502,439 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
People who come to Nebraska seldom describe the landscape as "lush." Most tourists don't have the vision for it. Agee does have it, and she writes the landscape into being so that the reader sees the vision, too...the blue open bowl of sky, the land that really isn't as flat as it looks driving through on I-80. Agee has it right--in Nebraska, especially for those who live from the land, it and the weather are other characters, living, breathing, gentle or stormy. The real people who live here are just as complicated as people living anywhere, and their motivations just as intriguing. This book offers a powerful vision because it is a vision which is so whole. The people and their weaknesses or desires aren't the only things which drive it. How do we know who we are apart from family, from place, from our own sense of ourselves in time, from our spirit? Agee has so much, so right; she has interwoven so many threads, and most of the time, it all holds. Most importantly, she doesn't seem to me to imitate anyone. Agee writes literature from the heart of the heartland that most people haven't seen flying over, driving through. This literature is worth staying a while
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on April 6, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Koja is one of the very few authors that "impresses" me. Her language is far beyond any of her contemperaries, especially the mainstream authors (stephen king couldn't write as beautifully as her even if he sold his soul--which I'm pretty sure he did) Anyway, this novel was good, but I didn't appreciate it as much as her earlier works. If you want koja at her best pick up her third novel, SKIN. It is a work of art. Another good one was THE CIPHER. I randomly grabbed THE CIPHER in a bookstore, back when I was in high school. I read the first paragraph and became an instant fan. I highly recommend it.
Kathe Koja is for readers who love poetic language. You can open up any of her books and read random paragraphs, totally unaware of what is going on, and LOVE doing it. I read SKIN for two years, only reading random excerpts. Just recently, I read it from begining to end for the very first time. And I loved every minute of it.
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Through his art therapist girlfriend, Grant meets Robin--a young schizophrenic whose exquisite art sparks an obsession. Strange Angels is written in Koja's distinctive abrupt and visceral style, but fails to exhibit or suit that style as well as some of her other work. There's something not quite strange enough about it: tropes linking madness and art are extremely problematic, but Koja comes just short of idealization; schizophrenia influences Robin's art but doesn't always aid or elevate it. It's welcome restraint, but robs the book of a purpose or payoff that could balance its dirty and joyless nature. Strange Angels is what one would expect from Koja, character-fueled and compelling, and fans may enjoy it, but it fails to be remarkable in its own right.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Koja has a command of language not generally found except by poets. If you love action/adventure stay away from this book. However, if you love to feel words on a visceral level and experience a new world from inside the head of new characters, try this book. Although dark, it touches on a primal level.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Strange Angels" is one of those books I clearly remember reading, for no other apparent reason than I was on vacation. It's also one of those books I had to read a second time to like, basically because my first impression was one of disappointment. I had thought "Strange Angels" was about--what else?--angels or some other type of supernatural entity, going by the synopsis on the back cover. However, I must have misinterpreted it, because the book isn't supernatural at all. It's about a photographer named Grant who becomes obsessed with his girlfriend's client, a mental patient named Robin, after he sees some of his drawings. Grant's interest in him has its repercussions, though, especially when he isolates Robin from his doctors and family in attempt to understand him better.
Koja's schizophrenic writing style perfectly suits the chaotic madness in both Grant and Robin's minds, making the story come more alive. Unfortunately, the ending is rather predictable and somewhat misleading. Mental disorders aren't as contagious as catching something like the flu, which makes me guess Grant wasn't all there to begin with. So, if you're into low-key, psychological horror, then you might like "Strange Angels."
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Jonis Agee's "Strange Angels" is a nobel attempt to modernize a Western. Set in contemporary Nebraska(Cherry county to be precise), the story follows the contempestous relationship between three siblings(Cody, Arthur and Kya). They all have a different mother, but the same father: recently deceased rancher Haywood Bennett. The novels follows their changing lives as Arthur tries to steal an attractive widow away from Cody, Kya tries to be less selfish(and man hungry), and their Indian friend Joseph tries to steer them along(he's the best character in the novel easily). Too slow for my tastes, and overly melodramatic with a hero that drinks A LOT. Only merits 2 stars.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on April 24, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While the language is at first irksome, it begins to grow on you, flowing in and out of episodes. All in all, this was an interesting search into the nature of madness, which is a place we are locked out of along the way. It certainly recalls the quote from Diane Arbus: "What I'm trying to get at is that you can never get inside someone else's head." Like an Arbus photograph, we feel ourselves abnormally close, yet the subject remains strangely ambiguous. Perhaps this book could have searched deeper into the inner workings of madness, but it works for what it is.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews