Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Sabbath Bloody Sabbath

4.7 out of 5 stars 325 customer reviews

See all 35 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Vinyl, January 8, 2013
This item’s packaging will indicate what is inside and cannot be hidden.

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Check Out Our Turntable Store
    Need a new record player? Check out our turntable store for a great selection of turntables, needles, accessories, and more.

Product Details

  • Vinyl (January 8, 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Nems
  • ASIN: B00AP0KD98
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (325 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,358,665 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Black Sabbath Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Since it was a big departure in sound from their first four albums most consider Black Sabbath's fifth disc the one that most divides critics and fans. Some think that the newly discovered keyboards (by Rick Wakeman, a member of the band Yes) and orchestral arrangements made "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" too artsy and soft. But others (like me) think that, while this album may be "more progressive" than usual, it is also their most creative effort to date. And, of course, like all Black Sabbath albums, the guitars are still very much involved. "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" does not skimp on the type of sludgy, rumbling riffs that Tony Iommi made Black Sabbath famous for. The catchy, churning main riff of the first track (the title song) helped to break the band out of the creative "dry spell" they were in, following the recording of their last release, "Vol. 4" (after Iommi discovered this guitar lick, the rest of the songs came easily.) This song also has a couple of acoustic breakdowns. Next, "A National Acrobat" has shimmering, wah-wah guitars, and "Fluff" is an instrumental. It's an interlude-type song, with serene, twinkling, acoustic jangles and cool, pretty piano keys. The synthesizers are most clearly evident on tracks four and six, "Sabbra Cadabra" and "Who Are You?" (the latter track, which has a melodic string arrangement, is very spacey--it sounds like it's the soundtrack to a laser or light show.) But "Killing Yourself To Live" is heavier and more up-tempo, as is "Looking For Today," which features a catchy, rhythmic hand-clap pattern. Lastly, "Spiral Architect" is where the orchestra joins the scene. Its lively, almost uplifting violins contrast Iommi's guitar solos well. So, "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" is a true gem which proves Black Sabbath were successfully able to expand on their sound and add creative touches to their music, while still remaining true to their roots. The sound quality can be a little dated at times, but this is yet another classic in Sabbath's catalogue.
2 Comments 61 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
If one were to ask what Black Sabbath's golden era was, most ivory-tower music historians and co-called "experts" would probably say it was the band's first four albums. If you were to ask anyone (critic, or fan) what was Sabbath's best offering, "Paranoid," (1970) or perhaps the self-titled debut, (1970) or even "Master of Reality" (1971) would be your answer. For this fan, however, I'm going to have to go with the band's fifth album "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" (1974) as being my personal favorite album by the legendary British metal band.

In terms of creativity, musicianship, and songwriting, the iron was still hot by the time Sabbath recorded "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath." Key elements that so defined the band's first four albums are still in place; blues-based, sluggish riffs, a gloomy outlook, and gothic trappings abound, but this time the band try to expand their sound by introducing synthesizers and orchestration into their formula (courtesy of Rick Wakeman of YES). Like any of the band's first six albums, Sabbath is as focused and tight as ever.

In all honesty, the first six albums are all classics, all flawless; you could really argue any of the first six releases as being the band's best album. I tend to give the nod to "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" because I think it showcases Iommi's best riffs and the added synths work really well encompassed into the band's bluesy/sluggish signature sound.

On "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath," like any classic Sabbath or early Ozzy solo work, we see Ozzy in his prime. Long before Ozzy Osbourne became a parody of himself, being known to most as an oafish buffoon on a reality show as opposed to an icon, he really was genuinely chilling.
Read more ›
6 Comments 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
With its cover image, one would expect to be led into some dark, abysmal, terrifying journey. Flip to the back cover, and everything is serene and 'heavenly', yet all the same people are intact and present. ''What's going on here,'' you say? Are these people intrinsically evil or are they good? Is the hell image truly how things are, and the heaven is what it's supposed to be like? On the inside cover, which was gatefold, there was the image of the band (Iommi/Osbourne/Butler/Ward) guarding a bed, like on the front cover, like spirits, warding off some bad karma or energy. It was all very weird.

And you haven't even heard the songs yet!

And what you get lyrically is the Black Sabbath manifesto. There is so much on here about 'heaven' and what 'hell' is made of it, that I am so surprised that they get the tag 'Evil'. No, what they are is quite knowledgable and self-empowering. What they are is quite critical of people who fill your head all full of lies. There are some amazing lyrics on this album, that totally go against what someone would have you believe Black Sabbath stood for. Devils and Demons. As if.......

If you didn't tell someone it was Black Sabbath, and printed the lyrics out, you'd be surprised at what answers you would get as to what was being said. Put the Black Sabbath 'tag' back in, and a preconception enters the head. ''Don't believe the life you have will be the only one, You have to let your body sleep, to let your soul live on'' - yea thats evil alright. Sheesh - get out my beads and incense, I'm in danger of being 'possessed'. Woooo-oooo-oooooo-oooooo. The whole album lyrically is like this, in direct contradiction to Black Sabbath's perceived image as Satan's Minstrels.

So how best to approach it?
Read more ›
8 Comments 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums




Look for Similar Items by Category