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Sacred Woman: A Guide to Healing the Feminine Body, Mind, and Spirit Hardcover – April 11, 2000

4.7 out of 5 stars 156 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

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Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Priestess of Neb-Het, an ancient Afrakan order, and a holistic healer, Queen Afua here guides women to spiritual and physical health. Librarians heard her speak at BookExpo America at the joint LJ/Random House breakfast.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: One World/Ballantine; 1 edition (April 11, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345423488
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345423481
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 8.2 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (156 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #730,106 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By TaRessa Stovall on June 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Spirit literally lifted my arm and put my hand onto this book in a bookstore. While I have been on a spiritual self-healing path for some time and discovered many wonderful books, SACRED WOMAN is truly a masterpiece, an incredibly user-friendly guide that inspires you to begin changing your life, raising your spirit and claiming your power before you're through with the second chapter! Well-researched and beautifully written, this book is for anyone who wants to feel their best and live to their full potential. Thank you, Queen Afua, for this amazing and lovely resource.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Queen Afua enlightens us again with her second book, SACRED WOMAN. It is pretty hard to follow so I suggest you highlight like crazy. It really is the format the she uses in her wholistic center laid out in book form. There is so much to learn so keep your brain wide open! She begins with Kemetic history and continues with the nine gateways to journey on to becoming a centered Womb-Man. This book is on my top 10 list of spiritual books. If you are a woman interested in Kemet life and wholistic living, read this.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. This is my first Afrocentric homeopathic healing book. I usually read websites and books about medicinal herbal remedies. I garden. I eat a mostly plant based diet. I am a black woman. I do yoga. Etc. So, some of the information in the book I’ve heard about in passing. Without this book I wouldn’t have the courage to incorporate many of the author’s suggestions into my life. The suggestions would just get filed in the back of my mind like, “yeah, I should add Epsom salts to my bath or drops of lavender oil”.

I must admit that some of this book was a bit of a joke to me. I understand that everyone comes from differing educational backgrounds and lifestyles but I found it surprising for women to lack knowledge of their monthly menstrual cycle. I was also almost offended by one or two statements in the book about history… but hey, facts are facts and just because I am ‘over’ history doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.

What I didn’t really love was the ritualistic nature of the entire book. I can’t imagine doing all that the author suggests. I don’t think I could go to work if I followed her guidelines. I added post its after post its to the book. There are so many teas, food ideas, relaxation ideas, suggested healing remedies (for ailments I don’t even have! LOL) that I know this book is invaluable. What I finally realized is that, like Christianity and segments of the Bible—this book is like a full manual to a lifestyle and (somewhat?) religious way of thinking. When I first opened the book I had no idea what the Khamit/Khamitic ways of thinking had to do with self-healing. By the end of the book I found myself carefully reading those sections. They are interesting.
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By A Customer on April 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
As a graduate of the "Sacred Woman" program several years ago, led by Queen Afua, I eagerly awaited this blessed book.
This book is a gem and a life saver. It will transform the way that all women look at themselves and other women. Her teachings on the womb and the ways of woman and girl-hood are revolutionary and much needed.
When I received the book, I made a commitment to repeat the Sacred Woman's training again. Some readers may have a problem with the Khamitic Nubian Philosphy and some of the language, however, if you are meditative and open, you gain new knowledge and wisdom that will be beneficial.
As the book progresses through each of the nine "gateways", you will gain a new way of thinking about your self as a whole woman. This is wholistic thinking. Here a woman gets to examine her body temple, her kitchen, her home, relationships and words, etc. Using the recommended tools she can take herself on a joyous spiritual journey. If one never travels through the gateways in deed, the information alone is worth thking in.
I heartily recommend this book to all women regardless of age, race and status. All will benefit from these teachings that will affect not only ourselves, but our families, homes and communities. In the words of poetess-healer Lady Prema, Heal A Woman, Heal A Nation!
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Format: Paperback
For me, this book had its good points and bad points.

I personally loved the ideas of embracing your womb and having a connectedness with your womb as a woman. Coming from somebody who has suffered her fair share of "female problems" it is easy to curse certain parts of your body. Learning to love them and care for them instead is a much better route in my opinion.

Other parts of the book just didn't do anything for me. I couldn't see integrating them into my life although they were interesting to read. And as with many "self help" type of books, it is very preachy in my opinion and leads one to believe there is no room for error or they are destined not to live a fulfilling life.

If you are interested in this book, I would say attempt to preview it first before purchasing to see if it is going to be a book you reach for lots and/or follow.
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