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Saga of the Swamp Thing Book Four Hardcover – February 1, 2011

4.9 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Hyperintelligent, emotionally potent, and, yes, fun. Grade: A."—Entertainment Weekly

"Perhaps the brainiest and scariest horror narrative of the '80s."—Rolling Stone

"Perhaps the first postmodern comic-book hero . . . unlike anything else in the Western artistic and literary tradition."—Salon


From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Alan Moore is perhaps the most acclaimed writer in the graphic story medium, having garnered countless awards for works such as WATCHMEN, V FOR VENDETTA, SWAMP THING and MIRACLEMAN. He is also the mastermind behind the America's Best Comics line, through which he has created (along with many talented illustrators) THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, PROMETHEA, TOM STRONG, TOMORROW STORIES and TOP TEN. As one of the medium's most important innovators since the early 1980s, Moore has influenced an entire generation of comics creators, and his work continues to inspire an ever-growing audience.
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Product Details

  • Series: Saga of the Swamp Thing (Book 4)
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (February 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401230180
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401230180
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.7 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #761,920 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A true American classic. Although written by a British man, Moore has an incredible amount of knowledge when it comes to American history and does a great job at using our countries dark past as inspiration for many of the stories. Swamp Thing deserves a space in any book or comic connoisseurs book shelf. Book four was me personal favorite because artist John Totleben added a really psychedelic aspect to swamp things jouneys, especially the scenes where swamp thing goes into the collective conscious of all plant life called "The Green". These pages have some of the most outstanding prose writing and perfectly inked and colored panels. Absolutely beautiful.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Out of all the writers who have ever handled the mystical characters of the DCU, Moore is by far the most adept. The central plot of this collection is in the latter 128 pgs. which is about an arcane tribe of witchdoctors called the Brujeria who have existed since prehistoric times and whose purpose is to align the necessary powers and elements in order to bring about the literal destruction of Heaven by summoning a force that can only be described as the LIVING force of monolithic darkness. Even many of the devils and demons of the DCU recognize this "act" as a threat to all of existence and have chosen to fight against it in order to preserve their own rights to power and stability in hell. It's a massive, epic story that Moore explores perfectly. There are also dramatic insights revealed about the Swamp Thing himself as he meets with the Parliament of trees and finds himself to be more of an anomaly than he had previously realized. Of course John Constantine is a central player in this whole event, and is as darkly humorous and cool as he's ever been portrayed in any comic. There are also appearances by just about every mystical or magical character in the DCU, and these appearances are guaranteed not to disappoint. One particularly noteworthy event takes place as several DCU human magicians come together to perform a seance-like magical rite as the battle for Heaven is taking place on the ethereal plane, and shock-waves of arcane power make their way into the mortal world of their circle. Without ruining it, let's just say it's a very intense death of Sargon and an even more dramatic death of Zatara.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are a fan of Watchmen, V for Vendetta, or any of his other work, and have yet to read this, I highly suggest it. I had heard of Moore's Swamp Thing run but had never read it; now that I have, I am glad I did. It's amazing to me that he wrote this while he was doing Watchmen as well.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
And we come to the end of the arc "American Gothic" and the final confrontation between light and darkness. In these stories the role of Constantine grows from a mere assistant to a key partner of the Swamp Thing, responsible for his "training" to achieve a new semi-divine status. In these stories becomes even clearer the mastery of Alan Moore's writing on various perspectives, giving depth to the characters. And it is clear also that both Neil Gaiman and his Sandman owe a lot to Moore, the mood of the stories, the use of characters such as Cain and Abel and Constantine himself and the entire idea behind Doll's House. This is the last work of Bissete and Totleben in the title, and they've been absent in several stories, despite all the substitutes maintain the same style, which ensures the fluidity and uniformity of the stories. The first story "Windfall" is a moral tale about the effects of the fruit that falls from the Swamp Thing and the way it affects different people.
"Bogeymen" features a serial killer which we never see his face since the story is always told by his point of view, what he sees and thinks. He mentions previous encounters with colleagues, which Gaiman used in the Doll House arc of Sandman.
"Ghost Dance" is one of the best stories of Moore, taking advantage of the American love of guns to tell the story of the house of a gun manufactoring dynasty (who really existed), haunted by by those who were slaughtered over the years by their guns, endlessly repeating the deaths. Break visitors are confronted with their weaknesses and betrayals.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's amazing. Swamp Thing is written as introspective, tortured, and desperate to connect with who he thinks he's supposed to be. I was so smitten with the character and story that I actually bought Saga of the Swamp Thing #20, just to have a more tangible piece of the history. Four is probably my favorite of the six.
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Format: Paperback
Book Four Covers December 1985 to July 1986

Windfall [art by Steve Woch and Ron Randell] - There are no bad stories in Alan Moore's run on Swamp Thing but some are better than others. This is not one of my favorite stories. A hippy comes across one of Swamp Thing's yams and takes it back to his place. After running some analysis he suspects it's a hallucinogen and gives a piece to a desperate friend who's wife is dying of cancer. As it turns out the yam gives good people amazing trips and bad people terrible trips.This is the second acid (yam) trip story and I wasn't a huge fan of the first either. The story isn't helped by the fact that it's drawn and inked by Woch and Randall rather than Bissette and Totleben.

Bogeyman [art by Stephen Bissette, Ron Randell and John Totleben] - There are few things more horrifying than a serial killer because they actually exist and the Swamp Thing comes across one of the most prolific killers imaginable. Alan Moore does an incredible job of making an already scary figure even more horrifying. Almost the entire story is viewed through the eyes and thoughts of the killer and at no point do we get a glimpse of his face. As one might expect a wire blade are no match for the muck encrusted mockery of a man.

Ghost Dance [art by Stan Woch and Alfredo Alcala] - This is Alan Moore's take on the classic ghost house and it's a great one. It's based on the Winchester Mystery House although Moore switches from Winchester to Cambridge which I don't believe is even a real rifle. Near the end the story loses a bit of steam as the house begins to burst at its seams from all the spirits but the finale was perfect given the context of the story.
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